Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Interventions for supporting pregnant women's decision-making about mode of birth after a caesarean

  1. Dell Horey1,*,
  2. Michelle Kealy2,
  3. Mary-Ann Davey2,
  4. Rhonda Small2,
  5. Caroline A Crowther3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 30 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 22 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010041.pub2


How to Cite

Horey D, Kealy M, Davey MA, Small R, Crowther CA. Interventions for supporting pregnant women's decision-making about mode of birth after a caesarean. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD010041. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010041.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    La Trobe University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bundoora, VIC, Australia

  2. 2

    La Trobe University, Mother and Child Health Research, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  3. 3

    The University of Adelaide, ARCH: Australian Research Centre for Health of Women and Babies, The Robinson Institute, Discipline of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

*Dell Horey, Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, 3086, Australia. d.horey@latrobe.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 30 JUL 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Abstract
  5. Plain language summary

Background

Pregnant women who have previously had a caesarean birth and who have no contraindication for vaginal birth after caesarean (VBAC) may need to decide whether to choose between a repeat caesarean birth or to commence labour with the intention of achieving a VBAC. Women need information about their options and interventions designed to support decision-making may be helpful. Decision support interventions can be implemented independently, or shared with health professionals during clinical encounters or used in mediated social encounters with others, such as telephone decision coaching services. Decision support interventions can include decision aids, one-on-one counselling, group information or support sessions and decision protocols or algorithms. This review considers any decision support intervention for pregnant women making birth choices after a previous caesarean birth.

Objectives

To examine the effectiveness of interventions to support decision-making about vaginal birth after a caesarean birth.

Secondary objectives are to identify issues related to the acceptability of any interventions to parents and the feasibility of their implementation.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 June 2013), Current Controlled Trials (22 July 2013), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal (ICTRP) (22 July 2013) and reference lists of retrieved articles. We also conducted citation searches of included studies to identify possible concurrent qualitative studies.

Selection criteria

All published, unpublished, and ongoing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials with reported data of any intervention designed to support pregnant women who have previously had a caesarean birth make decisions about their options for birth. Studies using a cluster-randomised design were eligible for inclusion but none were identified. Studies using a cross-over design were not eligible for inclusion. Studies published in abstract form only would have been eligible for inclusion if data were able to be extracted.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently applied the selection criteria and carried out data extraction and quality assessment of studies. Data were checked for accuracy. We contacted authors of included trials for additional information. All included interventions were classified as independent, shared or mediated decision supports. Consensus was obtained for classifications. Verification of the final list of included studies was undertaken by three review authors.

Main results

Three randomised controlled trials involving 2270 women from high-income countries were eligible for inclusion in the review. Outcomes were reported for 1280 infants in one study. The interventions assessed in the trials were designed to be used either independently by women or mediated through the involvement of independent support. No studies looked at shared decision supports, that is, interventions designed to facilitate shared decision-making with health professionals during clinical encounters.

We found no difference in planned mode of birth: VBAC (risk ratio (RR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97 to 1.10; I² = 0%) or caesarean birth (RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.10; I² = 0%). The proportion of women unsure about preference did not change (RR 0.87, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.20; I² = 0%).

There was no difference in adverse outcomes reported between intervention and control groups (one trial, 1275 women/1280 babies): permanent (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.32 to 1.36); severe (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.36); unclear (0.66, 95% CI 0.27, 1.61). Overall, 64.8% of those indicating preference for VBAC achieved it, while 97.1% of those planning caesarean birth achieved this mode of birth. We found no difference in the proportion of women achieving congruence between preferred and actual mode of birth (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.07) (three trials, 1921 women).

More women had caesarean births (57.3%), including 535 women where it was unplanned (42.6% all caesarean deliveries and 24.4% all births). We found no difference in actual mode of birth between groups, (average RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.06) (three trials, 2190 women).

Decisional conflict about preferred mode of birth was lower (less uncertainty) for women with decisional support (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.25, 95% CI -0.47 to -0.02; two trials, 787 women; I² = 48%). There was also a significant increase in knowledge among women with decision support compared with those in the control group (SMD 0.74, 95% CI 0.46 to 1.03; two trials, 787 women; I² = 65%). However, there was considerable heterogeneity between the two studies contributing to this outcome ( I² = 65%) and attrition was greater than 15 per cent and the evidence for this outcome is considered to be moderate quality only. There was no difference in satisfaction between women with decision support and those without it (SMD 0.06, 95% CI -0.09 to 0.20; two trials, 797 women; I² = 0%). No study assessed decisional regret or whether women's information needs were met.

Qualitative data gathered in interviews with women and health professionals provided information about acceptability of the decision support and its feasibility of implementation. While women liked the decision support there was concern among health professionals about their impact on their time and workload.

Authors' conclusions

Evidence is limited to independent and mediated decision supports. Research is needed on shared decision support interventions for women considering mode of birth in a pregnancy after a caesarean birth to use with their care providers.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Abstract
  5. Plain language summary

Interventions for supporting pregnant women with decisions about mode of birth after previous caesarean

Caesarean birth is increasingly common but this does not mean that all subsequent births are caesareans. Pregnant women who have had a previous caesarean birth may need to decide whether to have a planned caesarean birth or commence labour with the intention of a vaginal birth (VBAC). This can be a difficult decision and decision support tools may help women with their decision making. There are three main types of decision support. Women can use some decision support tools independently, the second type are intended to be shared with the health professionals responsible for a woman's care, and others are designed for use with a third party. Some call these mediated decision supports interventions. Decision supports can include telephone decision coaching services, decision-aids, one-on-one counselling, group information or support sessions and decision protocols or algorithms. This review considered any decision support intervention intended for pregnant women making birth choices after a previous caesarean birth.

We found three studies (involving 2270 women), all from high-income countries, that were suitable for this review. The studies looked at the effectiveness of decision support tools designed to be used either independently by women or mediated through the involvement of someone not associated with their care support. No studies looked at shared decision support tools that were intended to help with shared decision making with the pregnant women and their health professionals during pregnancy care visits.

We found that the use of these decision support tools made no difference to the type of birth women planned, how women actually gave birth, or in the number of women and babies who experienced harm, although only one study reported harms. There was also no difference in the proportion of women who were unsure about what they wanted. Overall, nearly 65% of women who wanted a VBAC achieved it, while almost all women wanting a caesarean birth had one (97%). We found no difference in the proportion of women who achieved their preferred mode of birth. However, women who used decisional support interventions had less uncertainty about their decision than those that did not use them. Research is needed on the effectiveness of decision support interventions designed to be shared between women and the health professionals caring for them in pregnancy after a caesarean birth.

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Abstract
  5. Plain language summary

Intervenções para ajudar gestantes com cesariana anterior a decidir sobre seu parto

Background

As gestantes que já tiveram uma cesariana anterior e que não tem contra indicações para um parto normal pós-cesariana (vaginal birth after caesarean - VBAC), precisam decidir entre marcar uma nova cesariana ou entrar em trabalho de parto com a intenção de ter um parto vaginal (VBAC). Para tomar essa decisão, essas mulheres precisam de informações sobre essas opções; portanto, intervenções para auxiliar essas mulheres na sua tomada de decisão podem ser úteis. Existem várias formas de oferecer essas intervenções: isoladamente, durante consultas de pré-natal com a participação de profissionais da saúde ou então através de pessoas externas (como por exemplo através de serviços de aconselhamento telefônico). Estas intervenções podem incluir o uso de folhetos informativos, aconselhamento individual, grupos informativos ou de apoio e uso de protocolos ou fluxogramas para ajudar na tomada de decisão. Esta revisão incluiu estudos que analisaram qualquer intervenção criada para ajudar gestantes com uma cesariana prévia a tomar uma decisão sobre o tipo de parto que gostariam de ter.

Objectives

O objetivo primário desta revisão foi avaliar a efetividade de intervenções para ajudar na tomada de decisão sobre o parto vaginal após uma cesariana.

Os objetivos secundários foram avaliar questões como aceitação dessas intervenções para o casal e viabilidade da sua implementação.

Search methods

As seguintes bases de dados eletrônicas foram pesquisadas: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 de Junho de 2013), Current Controlled Trials (22 de Julho de 2013), a plataforma WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal (ICTRP) (22 de Julho de 2013). A busca foi complementada pela revisão das listas de referências dos estudos incluídos para identificar possíveis estudos qualitativos.

Selection criteria

Foram incluídos todos os ensaios clínicos controlados randomizados (ECRs) e quasi-randomizados publicados, não publicados e em andamento que apresentavam dados sobre qualquer intervenção para ajudar gestantes com cesarianas prévias a decidir sobre suas opções de parto. Os estudos tipo cluster-randomizados também podiam ser incluídos na revisão, porém nenhum foi identificado. Os estudos tipo cross-over não eram elegíveis para inclusão. Os estudos publicados somente em forma de resumo seriam elegíveis se apresentassem dados suficientes.

Data collection and analysis

Dois revisores independentes avaliaram a elegibilidade dos estudos, extraíram seus dados e avaliaram sua qualidade. A acurácia dos dados foi verificada. Os autores dos estudos primários foram contatados para obter informações adicionais. Os estudos incluídos nesta revisão foram classificados em três grupos: intervenções independentes, compartilhadas ou mediadas por terceiros. A classificação dos estudos foi realizada através de consenso entre os revisores. A lista final dos estudos incluídos foi verificada por três autores de revisão.

Main results

Três estudos randomizados controlados envolvendo 2270 mulheres de países de alta renda foram elegíveis para a inclusão nesta revisão. Um estudo apresentou os desfechos de 1280 bebês. Esses estudos apresentaram intervenções independentes ou mediadas através de terceiros. Nenhum estudo avaliou intervenções para ajudar as mulheres a tomar decisões de forma compartilhada, em conversas com profissionais da saúde durante suas consultas de pré-natal.

Não foram encontradas diferenças nas taxas de parto planejado: VBAC (risco relativo (RR) 1,03, intervalo de confiança (IC) 95% 0,97 – 1,10; I² = 0%) ou cesariana (RR 0,96, IC 95% 0,84 – 1,10; I² = 0%). A proporção de mulheres indecisas sobre suas preferências não se alterou de forma significativa (RR 0.87, IC 95% 0,62 – 1,20; I² = 0%).

A taxa de eventos adversos foi semelhante entre os grupos de intervenção e controle (um estudo, 1275 mulheres/1280 bebês): desfechos adversos permanentes (RR 0,66, IC 95% 0,32 – 1,36); grave (RR 1,02, IC 95% 0,77 – 1,36); incerto (RR 0,66, IC 95% 0,27 – 1,61). Em geral, 64.8% das mulheres que indicaram preferência para o VBAC conseguiram realizar esse tipo de parto, enquanto 97.1% das que planejaram novas cesarianas alcançaram seu objetivo. Não encontramos diferença na proporção de mulheres que alcançaram coerência entre o modo preferido de parto e o modo real de parto (RR 1,02, IC 95% 0,96 – 1,07) (três estudos, 1921 mulheres).

O número de gestantes submetidas novamente a cesarianas foi maior (57.3%), incluindo nesse grupo um total de 535 mulheres que não planejavam ter esse tipo de parto (representando 42.6% de todas as cesarianas e 24.4% de todos os partos). Não encontramos diferenças no tipo de parto entre os grupos, (RR médio 0,97, IC 95% 0,89 – 1,06) (três estudos, 2190 mulheres).

A proporção de conflitos de decisão sobre o modo preferido de parto foi menor (menor incerteza) para gestantes que receberam panfletos informativos (diferença média padronizada (SMD) -0,25, IC 95% -0,47 a -0,02; dois estudos, 787 mulheres; I² = 48%). Houve também um aumento significativo do conhecimento entre as mulheres que receberam algum tipo de intervenção para ajudá-las na sua decisão, em comparação com as mulheres do grupo controle (SMD 0.74, IC 95% 0.46 -1.03; dois estudos, 787 mulheres; I² = 65%). Porém, como foi detectada uma heterogeneidade considerável entre os dois estudos que contribuíram para este desfecho (I² = 65%), e a taxa de perda de participantes foi maior que 15%, a evidência para este desfecho foi classificada como sendo de qualidade moderada. Não houve diferença significativa no grau de satisfação das mulheres entre os dois grupos (SMD 0,06, IC 95% -0,09 – 0.20; dois estudos, 797 mulheres; I² = 0%). Nenhum estudo avaliou arrependimento quanto à decisão ou se as necessidades de informação das mulheres foram atendidas.

Os dados qualitativos obtidos em entrevistas com as mulheres e com os profissionais da saúde foram usados para avaliar a aceitação da intervenção e a viabilidade de sua implementação. Enquanto as gestantes gostaram das intervenções para ajudá-las na sua tomada de decisão, os profissionais da saúde manifestaram preocupação quanto ao impacto dessas intervenções no seu tempo e na sua carga de trabalho.

Authors' conclusions

A evidência sobre a efetividade de intervenções para ajudar gestantes com cesariana anterior a tomar decisões sobre o tipo de parto preferido se limita apenas a intervenções independentes ou mediadas por terceiros. São necessários mais estudos sobre a efetividade de intervenções compartilhadas com profissionais de saúde.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Abstract
  5. Plain language summary

Intervenções para ajudar gestantes com cesariana anterior a decidir sobre seu parto

Intervenções para ajudar gestantes com cesariana anterior a decidir sobre seu parto

O parto por cesariana está se tornando cada vez mais frequente, porém isto não significa que todos os partos seguintes precisam também ser por cesariana. As gestantes que já tiveram uma cesariana podem ter que decidir se vão querer marcar outra cesariana ou se preferem entrar em trabalho de parto espontâneo com a intenção de ter um parto vaginal (VBAC). Esta pode ser uma decisão difícil e intervenções para auxiliá-las nesta decisão podem ser úteis. Existem três tipos gerais de intervenções para ajudar na tomada de decisões: as intervenções independentes, as compartilhadas com os profissionais da saúde responsáveis pelos seus cuidados e as intervenções mediadas por terceiros. As intervenções propriamente ditas podem incluir serviços de aconselhamento por telefone, panfletos informativos, aconselhamento individual, informação em grupo ou sessões de apoio e protocolos ou fluxogramas para ajudar na tomada de decisão. Esta revisão incluiu estudos que avaliaram qualquer tipo de intervenção para ajudar gestantes com uma cesariana prévia na sua tomada de decisão sobre o tipo de parto que gostaria de ter.

Encontramos três estudos (envolvendo 2270 mulheres), todos realizados em países de alta renda. Os estudos avaliaram a efetividade de intervenções para ajudar as gestantes na sua tomada de decisão; essas intervenções eram do tipo independente ou mediadas por terceiros. Nenhum dos estudos testou intervenções compartilhadas para ajudar na tomada de decisão, nas quais a gestante e os profissionais de saúde que cuidavam do seu pré-natal decidiam juntos sobre essa questão.

As intervenções avaliadas nesses estudos não fizeram diferença no planejamento do parto, no tipo de parto que as gestantes acabaram tendo ou no número de mulheres e bebês que tiveram alguma complicação, se bem que apenas um estudo avaliou esse último aspecto. Também não houve diferença na proporção de mulheres que estavam em dúvida sobre o que elas queriam. Em geral, aproximadamente 65% das mulheres que queriam tentar um parto normal conseguiram realizá-lo, e quase todas as que queriam uma cesariana conseguiram o seu desejo (97%). Não encontramos diferenças na proporção de mulheres que alcançaram seu modo preferido de parto. Entretanto, as mulheres no grupo de intervenção tiveram menos dúvidas sobre sua decisão do que aquelas que não receberam nenhum apoio no seu processo de tomada de decisão. São necessários mais estudos para avaliar a efetividade de intervenções para tomada de decisão compartilhada entre a gestante com cesariana anterior e os profissionais de saúde que cuidam do seu pré-natal.

Translation notes

Translated by: Brazilian Cochrane Centre
Translation Sponsored by: None