Intervention Review

You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article

FSH replaced by low-dose hCG in the late follicular phase versus continued FSH for assisted reproductive techniques

  1. Wellington P Martins*,
  2. Andrea DD Vieira,
  3. Jaqueline BP Figueiredo,
  4. Carolina O Nastri

Editorial Group: Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group

Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 5 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010042.pub2

How to Cite

Martins WP, Vieira ADD, Figueiredo JBP, Nastri CO. FSH replaced by low-dose hCG in the late follicular phase versus continued FSH for assisted reproductive techniques. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD010042. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010042.pub2.

Author Information

  1. University of Sao Paulo, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil

*Wellington P Martins, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Hospital das Clinicas da FMRP-USP, 8 andar, Campus Universitario da USP, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo, 14048-900, Brazil. wpmartins@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

During controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is frequently used for several days to achieve follicular development. FSH is a relatively expensive drug, substantially contributing to the total expenses of assisted reproductive techniques (ART). When follicles achieve a diameter greater than 10 mm they start expressing luteinising hormone (LH) receptors. At this point, FSH might be replaced by low-dose human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which is less expensive. In addition to cost reduction, replacing FSH by low-dose hCG has a theoretical potential to reduce the incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS).

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of using low-dose hCG to replace FSH during the late follicular phase in women undergoing COH for assisted reproduction, compared to the use of a conventional COH protocol.

Search methods

We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCT) in electronic databases (Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS), trials registers (ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform), conference abstracts (ISI Web of knowledge), and grey literature (OpenGrey); additionally we handsearched the reference list of included studies and similar reviews. The last electronic search was performed in February 2013..

Selection criteria

Only true RCTs comparing the replacement of FSH by low-dose hCG during late follicular phase of COH were considered eligible; quasi or pseudo-randomised trials were not included. Cross-over trials would be included only if data regarding the first treatment of each participant were available; trials that included the same participant more than once would be included only if each participant was always allocated to the same intervention and follow-up periods were the same in both/all arms, or if data regarding the first treatment of each participant were available. We excluded trials that sustained FSH after starting low-dose hCG and those that started FSH and low-dose hCG at the same time.

Data collection and analysis

Study eligibility, data extraction, and assessment of the risk of bias were performed independently by two review authors, and disagreements were solved by consulting a third review author. We corresponded with study investigators in order to solve any query, as required. The overall quality of the evidence was assessed in a GRADE summary of findings table.

Main results

The search retrieved 1585 records; from those five studies were eligible, including 351 women (intervention = 166; control = 185). All studies were judged to be at high risk of bias. All reported per-woman rather than per-cycle data.

When use of low-dose hCG to replace FSH was compared with conventional COH for the outcome of live birth, confidence intervals were very wide and findings were compatible with appreciable benefit, no effect or appreciable harm for the intervention (RR 1.56, 95% CI 0.75 to 3.25, 2 studies, 130 women, I² = 0%, very-low-quality evidence). This suggests that for women with a 14% chance of achieving live birth using conventional COH, the chance of achieving live birth using low-dose hCG would be between 10% and 45%.

Similarly confidence intervals were very wide for the outcome of OHSS and findings were compatible with benefit, no effect or harm for the intervention (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.59, 5 studies, 351 women, I² = 59%, very-low-quality evidence). This suggests that for women with a 3% risk of OHSS using conventional COH, the risk using low-dose hCG would be between 0% and 4%.

The confidence intervals were wide for the outcome of ongoing pregnancy and findings were compatible with benefit or no effect for the intervention (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.60, 3 studies, 252 women, I² = 0%, low-quality evidence). This suggests that for women with a 32% chance of achieving ongoing pregnancy using conventional COH, the chance using low-dose hCG would be between 27% and 53%.

The confidence intervals were wide for the outcome of clinical pregnancy and findings were compatible with benefit or no effect for the intervention (RR 1.19, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.55, 5 studies, 351 women, I² = 0%, low-quality evidence). This suggests that for women with a 35% chance of achieving clinical pregnancy using conventional COH, the chance using low-dose hCG would be between 32% and 54%.

The confidence intervals were very wide for the outcome of miscarriage and findings were compatible with benefit, no effect or harm for the intervention (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.50 to 2.31, 3 studies, 127 pregnant women, I² = 0%, very-low-quality evidence). This suggests that for pregnant women with a 16% risk of miscarriage using conventional COH, the risk using low-dose hCG would be between 8% and 36%.

The findings for the outcome of FSH consumption were compatible with benefit for the intervention (MD -639 IU, 95% CI -893 to -385, 5 studies, 333 women, I² = 88%, moderate-quality evidence).

The findings for the outcome of number of oocytes retrieved were compatible with no effect for the intervention (MD -0.12 oocytes, 95% CI -1.0 to 0.8 oocytes, 5 studies, 351 women, I² = 0%, moderate-quality evidence).

Authors' conclusions

We are very uncertain of the effect on live birth, OHSS and miscarriage of using low-dose hCG to replace FSH during the late follicular phase of COH in women undergoing ART, compared to the use of conventional COH. The current evidence suggests that this intervention does not reduce the chance of ongoing and clinical pregnancy; and that it is likely to result in an equivalent number of oocytes retrieved expending less FSH. More studies are needed to strengthen the evidence regarding the effect of this intervention on important reproductive outcomes.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Replacing FSH by hCG to complete follicular growth in women undergoing assisted reproduction

Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) - a relatively expensive drug - is commonly used for several days to stimulate the ovaries of women undergoing assisted reproduction. Initial studies have shown that after a few days of using FSH to stimulate the ovaries, it can be replaced by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which is less expensive. In addition to cost reduction, this intervention has a theoretical potential to reduce the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS); though the underlying risk is already very low for most women. We searched the medical literature on in February 2013 for studies that evaluated the effectiveness and safety of using low-dose hCG to replace FSH during the late follicular phase in women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for assisted reproduction, compared to the use of a conventional COH protocol. Five studies evaluating 351 women were included in this review. These studies were funded by fertility centres, universities, or both. We are very uncertain of the effect of this intervention on live birth, OHSS and miscarriage

When use of low-dose hCG to replace FSH was compared with conventional COH, there was very low quality evidence compatible with appreciable benefit, no effect or appreciable harm for the intervention, suggesting that for women with a 14% chance of achieving live birth using a conventional COH, the chance of achieving live birth using low-dose hCG would be between 10% and 45%. Similarly, there was very low quality evidence suggesting that for women with a 3% risk of OHSS using a conventional COH, the risk using low-dose hCG was also compatible with either benefit or harm, and would be between 0% and 4%.

Additionally we observed that there was low quality evidence suggesting that for women with a 32% chance of achieving ongoing pregnancy using a conventional COH, the chance using low-dose hCG was compatible with either benefit or no effect, and would be between 27% and 53%. There was low quality evidence suggesting that for women with a 35% chance of achieving clinical pregnancy using a conventional COH, the chance using low-dose hCG was compatible with either benefit or no effect, and would be between 32% and 54%. There was very low quality evidence suggesting that for pregnant women with a 16% risk of miscarriage using a conventional COH, the risk using low-dose hCG was compatible with either benefit or harm, and would be between 8% and 36%. We also observed that there is moderate-quality evidence that this intervention reduces the total FSH consumption and is unlikely to materially affect the number of oocytes retrieved

Our conclusions are that we are very uncertain of the effect on live birth, OHSS and miscarriage of using low-dose hCG to replace FSH during the late follicular phase of COH in women undergoing ART, compared to the use of conventional COH. The current evidence suggests that this intervention does not reduce the chance of ongoing and clinical pregnancy; and that it is likely to result in an equivalent number of oocytes retrieved expending less FSH. More studies are needed to strengthen the evidence regarding the effect of this intervention on important reproductive outcomes.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Remplacement de la FSH par l'administration d'hCG à faible dose dans la phase folliculaire tardive comparé à la poursuite de l'administration de la FSH pour les techniques de procréation médicalement assistée

Contexte

Lors de l'hyperstimulation ovarienne contrôlée (HOC), l'hormone folliculo-stimulante (FSH) est fréquemment utilisée pendant plusieurs jours pour susciter le développement folliculaire. La FSH est un médicament relativement onéreux, ce qui contribue considérablement aux dépenses totales des techniques de procréation médicalement assistée (TPMA). Quand les follicules atteignent un diamètre supérieur à 10 mm, ils commencent à exprimer les récepteurs de l'hormone lutéinisante (HL). À ce stade, la FSH pourrait être remplacée par la gonadotrophine chorionique humaine (hCG) à faible dose, qui est moins chère. En plus des réductions de coût, le remplacement de la FSH par l'hCG à faible dose peut théoriquement réduire l'incidence du syndrome d'hyperstimulation ovarienne (SHO).

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de l'administration d'hCG à faible dose pour remplacer la FSH pendant la phase folliculaire tardive chez les femmes subissant une hyperstimulation ovarienne contrôlée (HOC) pour une procréation médicalement assistée, comparée à l'utilisation d'un protocole HOC conventionnel.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons recherché des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) dans les bases de données électroniques (le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les troubles menstruels et de la fertilité, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS), les registres d'essais (ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, le système d'enregistrement international des essais cliniques de l'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé), les actes de conférences (ISI Web of knowledge), et la littérature grise (OpenGrey) ; en outre, nous avons effectué des recherches manuelles dans les références bibliographiques des études incluses et les revues similaires. Les dernières recherches électroniques ont été effectuées en février 2013.

Critères de sélection

Seuls les ECR réels comparant le remplacement de la FSH par l'hCG à faible dose pendant la phase folliculaire tardive de l'hyperstimulation ovarienne contrôlée (HOC) ont été considérés comme éligibles ; les essais quasi ou pseudo-randomisés n'ont pas été inclus. Les essais croisés n'ont été inclus que si les données concernant le premier traitement de chaque participante étaient disponibles ; les essais qui ont inclus la même participante plus d'une fois n'ont été inclus que si chaque participante était toujours affectée à la même intervention et si les périodes de suivi étaient les mêmes dans les deux/tous les bras, ou si les données concernant le premier traitement de chaque participante étaient disponibles. Nous avons exclu les essais dans lesquels la FSH a été maintenue après le début de l'administration d'hCG à faible dose et ceux dans lesquels la FSH et l'hCG à faible dose ont été commencées en même temps.

Recueil et analyse des données

L'évaluation de l'éligibilité des études, l'extraction des données, et l'évaluation des risques de biais ont été réalisées indépendamment par deux auteurs de la revue, et les désaccords ont été résolus en faisant intervenir un troisième auteur. Nous avons correspondu avec les chercheurs des études afin d'éliminer le moindre doute, en cas de besoin. La qualité globale des preuves a été évaluée dans un résumé des tables de résultats GRADE.

Résultats Principaux

La recherche a permis de trouver 1 585 dossiers ; parmi ces derniers cinq études étaient éligibles, totalisant 351 femmes (intervention = 166 ; témoin = 185). Toutes les études ont été considérées comme présentant des risques élevés de biais. Toutes ont rapporté les données par femme et non pas par cycle.

Lorsque l'administration d'hCG à faible dose pour remplacer la FSH a été comparée à un protocole HOC conventionnel pour le résultat des naissances vivantes, les intervalles de confiance étaient très larges et les observations étaient compatibles avec un bénéfice appréciable, l'absence d'effet ou un danger appréciable pour l'intervention (RR 1,56, IC à 95 % 0,75 à 3,25, 2 études, 130 femmes, I² = 0 %, preuves de très faible qualité). Ceci suggère que pour les femmes ayant 14 % de chances d'obtenir une naissance vivante en utilisant un protocole HOC conventionnel, les chances d'obtenir une naissance vivante avec l'administration d'hCG à faible dose seraient comprises entre 10 % et 45 %.

De même, les intervalles de confiance étaient très larges pour le résultat du syndrome d'hyperstimulation ovarienne (SHO) et les observations étaient compatibles avec un bénéfice, l'absence d'effet ou un danger pour l'intervention (RC 0,30, IC à 95 % 0,06 à 1,59, 5 études, 351 femmes, I² = 59 %, preuves de très faible qualité). Ceci suggère que pour les femmes présentant un risque de 3 % de syndrome d'hyperstimulation ovarienne (SHO) en utilisant un protocole HOC conventionnel, le risque avec l'administration d'hCG à faible dose serait compris entre 0 % et 4 %.

Les intervalles de confiance étaient larges pour le résultat des grossesses en cours et les observations étaient compatibles avec un bénéfice ou l'absence d'effet pour l'intervention (RR 1,14, IC à 95 % 0,81 à 1,60, 3 études, 252 femmes, I² = 0 %, preuves de faible qualité). Ceci suggère que pour les femmes ayant 32 % de chances d'obtenir une grossesse en cours en utilisant un protocole HOC conventionnel, les chances avec l'administration d'hCG à faible dose seraient comprises entre 27 % et 53 %.

Les intervalles de confiance étaient larges pour le résultat des grossesses cliniques et les observations étaient compatibles avec un bénéfice ou l'absence d'effet pour l'intervention (RR 1,19, IC à 95 % 0,92 à 1,55, 5 études, 351 femmes, I² = 0 %, preuves de faible qualité). Ceci suggère que pour les femmes ayant 35 % de chances d'obtenir une grossesse clinique en utilisant un protocole HOC conventionnel, les chances avec l'administration d'hCG à faible dose seraient comprises entre 32 % et 54 %.

Les intervalles de confiance étaient très larges pour le résultat des fausses couches et les observations étaient compatibles avec un bénéfice, l'absence d'effet ou un danger pour l'intervention (RR 1,08, IC à 95 % 0,50 à 2,31, 3 études, 127 femmes enceintes, I² = 0 %, preuves de très faible qualité). Ceci suggère que pour les femmes enceintes présentant un risque de 16 % de fausses couches en utilisant un protocole HOC conventionnel, le risque avec l'administration d'hCG à faible dose serait compris entre 8 % et 36 %.

Les observations pour le résultat de la consommation de FSH étaient compatibles avec un bénéfice pour l'intervention (DM -639 UI, IC à 95 % -893 à -385, 5 études, 333 femmes, I² = 88 %, preuves de qualité modérée).

Les observations pour le résultat du nombre d'ovocytes récupérés étaient compatibles avec l'absence d'effet pour l'intervention (DM -0,12 ovocyte, IC à 95 % -1,0 à 0,8 ovocytes, 5 études, 351 femmes, I² = 0 %, preuves de qualité modérée).

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous n'avons absolument aucune certitude quant à l'effet sur les naissances vivantes, le syndrome d'hyperstimulation ovarienne (SHO) et les fausses couches de l'administration d'hCG à faible dose pour remplacer la FSH pendant la phase folliculaire tardive de l'hyperstimulation ovarienne contrôlée (HOC) chez les femmes bénéficiant d'une technique de procréation médicalement assistée (TPMA), par rapport à l'utilisation d'un protocole HOC conventionnel. Les preuves actuelles suggèrent que cette intervention ne réduit pas les chances de grossesses en cours et cliniques ; et qu'il est probable qu'elle aboutisse à un nombre équivalent d'ovocytes récupérés en utilisant moins de FSH. D'autres études sont nécessaires pour renforcer les preuves concernant l'effet de cette intervention sur d'importants critères de jugement pour la procréation.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Remplacement de la FSH par l'administration d'hCG à faible dose dans la phase folliculaire tardive comparé à la poursuite de l'administration de la FSH pour les techniques de procréation médicalement assistée

Remplacement de la FSH par l'hCG pour achever la croissance folliculaire chez les femmes bénéficiant d'une technique de procréation médicalement assistée

L'hormone folliculo-stimulante (FSH) - un médicament relativement onéreux - est couramment utilisée pendant plusieurs jours pour stimuler les ovaires des femmes bénéficiant d'une technologie de procréation assistée. Des études initiales ont montré que, après quelques jours d'administration de FSH pour stimuler les ovaires, elle peut être remplacée par la gonadotrophine chorionique humaine (hCG), qui est moins chère. En plus des réductions de coût, cette intervention peut théoriquement réduire le risque de syndrome d'hyperstimulation ovarienne (SHO) ; bien que le risque sous-jacent soit déjà très faible pour la plupart des femmes. Nous avons effectué une recherche dans la littérature jusqu'en février 2013 pour identifier des études ayant évalué l'efficacité et l'innocuité de l'administration d'hCG à faible dose pour remplacer la FSH pendant la phase folliculaire tardive chez les femmes subissant une hyperstimulation ovarienne contrôlée (HOC) pour une procréation médicalement assistée, par rapport à l'utilisation d'un protocole HOC conventionnel. Cinq études ayant évalué 351 femmes ont été incluses dans cette revue. Ces études ont été financées par un service de consultation externe de fertilité, une université, ou les deux. Nous n'avons absolument aucune certitude quant à l'effet de cette intervention sur les naissances vivantes, le syndrome d'hyperstimulation ovarienne (SHO) et les fausses couches.

Lorsque l'administration d'hCG à faible dose pour remplacer la FSH a été comparée à un protocole HOC conventionnel, il y avait des preuves de très faible qualité compatibles avec un bénéfice appréciable, l'absence d'effet ou un danger appréciable pour l'intervention, suggérant que pour les femmes ayant 14 % de chances d'obtenir une naissance vivante en utilisant un protocole HOC conventionnel, les chances d'obtenir une naissance vivante avec l'administration d'hCG à faible dose seraient comprises entre 10 % et 45 %. De même, il y avait des preuves de très faible qualité suggérant que pour les femmes présentant un risque de 3 % de syndrome d'hyperstimulation ovarienne (SHO) en utilisant un protocole HOC conventionnel, le risque avec l'administration d'hCG à faible dose était également compatible soit avec un bénéfice soit avec un danger, et serait compris entre 0 % et 4 %.

En outre, nous avons observé qu'il y avait des preuves de faible qualité suggérant que pour les femmes ayant 32 % de chances d'obtenir une grossesse en cours en utilisant un protocole HOC conventionnel, les chances avec l'administration d'hCG à faible dose étaient compatibles soit avec un bénéfice soit avec l'absence d'effet, et seraient comprises entre 27 % et 53 %. Il y avait des preuves de faible qualité suggérant que pour les femmes ayant 35 % de chances d'obtenir une grossesse clinique en utilisant un protocole HOC conventionnel, les chances avec l'administration d'hCG à faible dose étaient compatibles soit avec un bénéfice soit avec l'absence d'effet, et seraient comprises entre 32 % et 54 %. Il y avait des preuves de très faible qualité suggérant que pour les femmes enceintes présentant un risque de 16 % de fausse couche en utilisant un protocole HOC conventionnel, le risque avec l'administration d'hCG à faible dose était compatible soit avec un bénéfice soit avec un danger, et serait compris entre 8 % et 36 %. Nous avons également observé qu'il y avait des preuves de qualité modérée que cette intervention réduit la consommation totale de FSH et qu'il est peu probable qu'elle affecte substantiellement le nombre d'ovocytes récupérés.

Nos conclusions sont que nous n'avons absolument aucune certitude quant à l'effet sur les naissances vivantes, le syndrome d'hyperstimulation ovarienne (SHO) et les fausses couches de l'administration d'hCG à faible dose pour remplacer la FSH pendant la phase folliculaire tardive du protocole HOC chez les femmes bénéficiant d'une technique de procréation médicalement assistée (TPMA), par rapport à l'utilisation d'un protocole HOC conventionnel. Les preuves actuelles suggèrent que cette intervention ne réduit pas les chances de grossesses en cours et cliniques ; et qu'il est probable qu'elle aboutisse à un nombre équivalent d'ovocytes récupérés en utilisant moins de FSH. D'autres études sont nécessaires pour renforcer les preuves concernant l'effet de cette intervention sur d'importants critères de jugement pour la procréation.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux pour la France: Minist�re en charge de la Sant�