Intervention Review

Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation for people with neuromuscular disorders

  1. Brenda Morrow1,*,
  2. Marco Zampoli2,
  3. Helena van Aswegen3,
  4. Andrew Argent4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group

Published Online: 30 DEC 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 7 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010044.pub2

How to Cite

Morrow B, Zampoli M, van Aswegen H, Argent A. Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation for people with neuromuscular disorders. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD010044. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010044.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Cape Town, Department of Paediatrics, Cape Town, South Africa

  2. 2

    Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital and University of Cape Town, Pulmonology, and Paediatric Medicine, Cape Town, South Africa

  3. 3

    University of the Witwatersrand, Physiotherapy Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Johannesburg, South Africa

  4. 4

    Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital and University of Cape Town, Pediatric Intensive Care, Division of Pediatric Critical Care and Children's Heart Disease, Cape Town, South Africa

*Brenda Morrow, Department of Paediatrics, University of Cape Town, 5th Floor ICH Building, Red Cross Memorial Children's Hospital, Klipfontein Road, Rondebosch, 7700, Cape Town, South Africa. Brenda.morrow@uct.ac.za.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 30 DEC 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

People with neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) may have weak respiratory (breathing) muscles which makes it difficult for them to effectively cough and clear mucus from the lungs. This places them at risk of recurrent chest infections and chronic lung disease. Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation (MI-E) is one of a number of techniques available to improve cough efficacy and mucus clearance.

Objectives

To determine the efficacy and safety of MI-E in people with NMDs.

Search methods

On 7 October 2013, we searched the following databases from inception: the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, and EMBASE. We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. We conducted handsearches of reference lists and conference proceedings.

Selection criteria

We considered randomised or quasi-randomised clinical trials, and randomised cross-over trials of MI-E used to assist airway clearance in people with a NMD and respiratory insufficiency. We considered comparisons of MI-E with no treatment, or alternative cough augmentation techniques.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias in included studies according to standard Cochrane methodology. The primary outcome was mortality throughout follow-up or at six months follow-up.

Main results

Five studies with a total of 105 participants were found to be eligible for inclusion in this review. All included trials were short-term studies (two days or less), measuring immediate effects of the interventions. There was insufficient detail in the reports to assess methods of randomisation and allocation concealment. All five studies were at a high risk of bias from lack of blinding. The studies did not report on mortality, morbidity, quality of life, serious adverse events or any of the other prespecified outcomes. One study was a randomised cross-over trial conducted over two days, in which investigators applied two interventions twice daily in randomly assigned order, with a reverse cross-over the following day. Four studies applied multiple interventions for cough augmentation to each participant, in random order. One study reported fatigue as an adverse effect of MI-E, using a visual analogue scale. Peak cough expiratory flow (PCEF) was the most common outcome measure and was reported in four studies. Based on three studies, MI-E may improve PCEF compared to an unassisted cough. All interventions increased PCEF to the critical level necessary for mucus clearance. The included studies did not clearly show that MI-E improves cough expiratory flow more than other cough augmentation techniques. Based on one study, which was at risk of assessor bias, the addition of MI-E may reduce treatment time when added to a standard airway clearance regimen with manually assisted cough. MI-E appeared to be as well tolerated as other cough augmentation techniques, based on three studies which reported comfort visual analogue scores.

Authors' conclusions

The results of this review do not provide sufficient evidence on which to base clinical practice as we were unable to address important short- and long-term outcomes, including adverse effects of MI-E. There is currently insufficient evidence for or against the use of MI-E in people with NMDs. Further randomised controlled clinical trials are needed to test the safety and efficacy of MI-E.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation to improve mucus clearance in people with neuromuscular disorders

Review question

Our aim in this review was to find out how well mechanical insufflation-exsufflation (MI-E) works and how safe it is to use in people with neuromuscular disorders (diseases of the peripheral nerves or muscles) who have breathing problems.

Background

People with neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) sometimes have weak breathing muscles. This can make it difficult for them to cough and clear mucus from the lungs well, putting them at risk of repeated chest infections and ongoing lung disease. MI-E is one of a number of methods used to improve cough and mucus clearance. MI-E is given through a mask, mouthpiece, or via a tracheostomy (an opening in the neck into the windpipe). MI-E acts like a cough by first pushing air into the lungs when the person breathes in (insufflation), then sucking it out again (exsufflation).

Methods

We carried out a wide database search for trials of MI-E in people with NMDs. We only included trials in which people were assigned to the treatments by chance, as these studies provide the best quality evidence.

Results and quality of the evidence

We found five trials, with 105 people. They all studied the immediate effects of a single treatment with MI-E. The studies compared MI-E to other ways of helping people cough, or normal cough without help. One trial studied MI-E when added to other treatment. Based on three trials, MI-E may improve the outwards flow of air during coughing compared to a normal cough without help. MI-E was not clearly better than other methods of improving cough. None of the studies measured the outcomes that we thought were important for making decisions about the usefulness of MI-E. For example, the studies did not report on survival, length of hospital stay, quality of life, or serious side effects. One study reported extreme tiredness as a side effect of MI-E. There was often not enough information in the reports to tell whether the studies were well run; in some we found design problems that could have affected the results.

The findings of this review do not give enough evidence on which to make decisions. We were unable to find any information from trials on important short- and long-term effects, including side effects of MI-E in NMDs.

There is currently insufficient evidence for or against the use of MI-E to help people with NMDs clear mucus from their lungs. Further studies are needed to better understand the benefits and risks of MI-E in relation to other methods of cough assistance.

The evidence in the review is up to date as of 7 October 2013.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'insufflation-exsufflation mécanique chez les patients souffrant de troubles neuromusculaires

Contexte

Les patients atteints de troubles neuromusculaires (NMD) possèdent parfois des muscles respiratoires (la respiration) affaiblis, ils rencontrent ainsi des difficultés pour tousser ou dégager le mucus dans les poumons. Cela accroit le risque d'infections pulmonaires répétées et de maladies pulmonaires chroniques. L'insufflation-exsufflation mécanique (IE-M) est l'une des nombreuses techniques disponibles pour améliorer l’efficacité de la toux et l’élimination du mucus.

Objectifs

Déterminer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de l’IE-M chez les patients atteints de NMD.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Le 7 octobre 2013, nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes depuis leur date de création : le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les affections neuromusculaires, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE et EMBASE. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans ClinicalTrials.gov et le système d’enregistrement international des essais cliniques de l’organisation mondiale de la santé pour les essais en cours. Nous avons effectué des recherches manuelles dans des références bibliographiques et des actes de conférence.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons pris en compte les essais cliniques randomisés ou quasi-randomisés et les essais croisés randomisés d’IE-M utilisés pour aider le dégagement des voies respiratoires chez les patients souffrant d’insuffisance respiratoire et de NMD. Nous avons pris en compte les comparaisons d’IE-M à l'absence de traitement, ou à d'autres techniques d'augmentation de la toux.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment évalué l'éligibilité, extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais dans les études incluses selon la méthodologie standard Cochrane. Le critère de jugement principal était la mortalité durant tout le suivi ou à six mois de suivi.

Résultats Principaux

Cinq études avec un total de 105 participants ont été identifiées comme étant éligibles pour être incluses dans cette revue. Tous les essais inclus étaient des études à court terme (deux jours ou moins), mesurant les effets immédiats des interventions. Les rapports ne fournissaient pas suffisamment de détails pour évaluer les méthodes de randomisation et d'assignation secrète. Les cinq études présentaient un risque de biais élevé dû au manque de masquage. Les études n'ont pas rapporté sur la mortalité, la morbidité, la qualité de vie, les effets indésirables graves, ni sur aucun des autres critères de jugement prédéfinis. Une étude était un essai croisé randomisé réalisé sur deux jours, dans lequel les investigateurs appliquaient deux interventions deux fois par jour de manière aléatoire, avec un inversement croisé le jour suivant. Quatre études appliquaient de multiples interventions afin d’augmenter la toux, ceci pour chaque participant et en ordre aléatoire. Une étude rapportait la fatigue comme un effet indésirable d’IE-M, à l'aide d'une échelle visuelle analogique. Le débit expiratoire de pointe (DEP) à la toux était le critère de jugement le plus couramment rapporté dans quatre études. Sur la base de trois études, l’IE-M pourrait améliorer le DEP à la toux par rapport à une toux sans assistance. Toutes les interventions augmentaient le DEP à la toux au niveau critique nécessaire pour l'élimination du mucus. Les études incluses n'ont pas clairement montré que l’IE-M améliore le débit expiratoire de la toux plus que d'autres techniques d'augmentation de la toux. Sur la base d'une étude, qui présentait un risque de biais, l'ajout de l’IE-M pourrait réduire la durée du traitement lorsqu'elle est ajoutée à un schéma posologique standard de dégagement des voies respiratoires d’une toux assistée manuellement. L’IE-M semble être aussi bien tolérée que d'autres techniques d'augmentation de la toux, sur la base de trois études qui rapportaient l’échelle visuelle analogique.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les résultats de cette revue ne fournissent pas suffisamment de preuves susceptibles d'orienter la pratique clinique car nous n'avons pas été en mesure d’apporter de résultats importants à court et à long terme, y compris les effets indésirables des IE-M. Il n'existe actuellement pas suffisamment de preuves pour favoriser ou non l'utilisation d’IE-M chez les patients atteints de NMD. D'autres essais cliniques contrôlés randomisés sont nécessaires pour tester l'efficacité et l'innocuité d’IE-M.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'insufflation-exsufflation mécanique chez les patients souffrant de troubles neuromusculaires

L'insufflation-exsufflation mécanique pour améliorer l'élimination du mucus chez les patients souffrant de troubles neuromusculaires

Question de la revue

L’objectif de cette revue était de déterminer l'efficacité de l’insufflation-exsufflation mécanique (IE-M) et si elle est sûre pour être utilisée chez les patients atteints de troubles neuromusculaires (maladies des nerfs périphériques ou des muscles) qui ont des problèmes respiratoires.

Contexte

Les patients atteints de troubles neuromusculaires (NMD) possèdent parfois des muscles respiratoires affaiblis. Ils peuvent ainsi rencontrer des difficultés pour tousser ou dégager le mucus dans les poumons, ce qui accroit le risque d'infections pulmonaires répétées et de maladies pulmonaires chroniques. L’IE-M fait partie d’une des nombreuses méthodes utilisées pour améliorer la toux et l'élimination du mucus. L’IE-M est administrée au moyen d'un masque, d’un embout buccal, ou via une trachéostomie (une ouverture dans le cou à l’intérieur de la trachée). L’IE-M agit comme une toux en poussant tout d’abord de l'air dans les poumons lorsque la personne respire (insufflation), puis en l'éliminant de nouveau vers l’extérieur (exsufflation).

Méthodes

Nous avons réalisé une vaste recherche dans les bases de données d'essais d’EI-M chez les patients atteints de NMD. Nous avons uniquement inclus les essais dans lesquels les patients ont été assignés aux traitements de façon hasardeuse, car ces études fournissent les meilleures preuves de qualité.

Les résultats et la qualité des preuves

Nous avons trouvé cinq essais, totalisant 105 personnes. Tous les essais étudiaient les effets immédiats du traitement unique avec l’IE-M. Les études ont comparé l’IE-M à d'autres méthodes visant à aider les personnes à tousser sans assistance. Un essai étudiait l’IE-M lorsqu' elle était combinée à un autre traitement. Sur la base de trois essais, l’IE-M peut améliorer le flux d'air dirigé vers l’extérieur lors de la toux par rapport à une toux normale sans assistance. L’IE-M n'était manifestement pas plus efficace que d'autres méthodes pour améliorer la toux. Aucune des études n’a mesuré les critères de jugement que nous considérions être importants pour la prise de décision concernant l'utilité de l’IE-M. Par exemple, les études n'avaient pas rendu compte de la survie, de la durée de séjour à l'hôpital, de la qualité de vie ou des effets secondaires graves. Une étude a rapporté une fatigue extrême comme un effet secondaire de l’IE-M. Les rapports ne fournissaient souvent pas suffisamment d'informations pour savoir si les études étaient bien exécutées; dans certains rapports, nous avons trouvé des problèmes de conception qui pourraient avoir affecté les résultats.

Les résultats de cette revue ne fournissent pas suffisamment de preuves permettant de prendre des décisions. Nous ne sommes pas parvenus à trouver d'informations issues d'essais sur d'importants effets à court et à long terme, y compris les effets secondaires de l’IE-M dans les NMD.

Il n'existe actuellement pas suffisamment de preuves pour savoir si l’IE-M aide ou non les patients atteints de NMD à dégager le mucus dans les poumons. D'autres études sont nécessaires pour mieux comprendre les bénéfices et les risques de l’IE-M par rapport à d'autres méthodes assistant la toux.

Les preuves de la revue sont à jour le 7 octobre 2013.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé