Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Routine vaginal examinations for assessing progress of labour to improve outcomes for women and babies at term

  1. Soo Downe1,*,
  2. Gillian ML Gyte2,
  3. Hannah G Dahlen3,
  4. Mandisa Singata4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 15 JUL 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 4 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010088.pub2


How to Cite

Downe S, Gyte GML, Dahlen HG, Singata M. Routine vaginal examinations for assessing progress of labour to improve outcomes for women and babies at term. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD010088. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010088.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Central Lancashire, Research in Childbirth and Health (ReaCH) unit, Preston, UK

  2. 2

    The University of Liverpool, Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, UK

  3. 3

    University of Western Sydney, Family and Community Health Research Group, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Penrith Routh DC, NSW, Australia

  4. 4

    University of the Witwatersrand/University of Fort Hare/East London Hospital complex, Effective Care Research Unit, East London, South Africa

*Soo Downe, Research in Childbirth and Health (ReaCH) unit, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE, UK. sdowne@uclan.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 15 JUL 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Vaginal examinations have become a routine intervention in labour as a means of assessing labour progress. Used at regular intervals, either alone or as a component of the partogram (a pre-printed form providing a pictorial overview of the progress of labour), the aim is to assess if labour is progressing physiologically, and to provide an early warning of slow progress. Abnormally slow progress can be a sign of labour dystocia, which is associated with maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, particularly in low-income countries where appropriate interventions cannot easily be accessed. However, over-diagnosis of dystocia can lead to iatrogenic morbidity from unnecessary intervention (e.g. operative vaginal birth or caesarean section). It is, therefore, important to establish whether or not the routine use of vaginal examinations is an effective intervention, both as a diagnostic tool for true labour dystocia, and as an accurate measure of physiological labour progress.

Objectives

To compare the effectiveness, acceptability and consequences of digital vaginal examination(s) (alone or within the context of the partogram) with other strategies, or different timings, to assess progress during labour at term.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (28 February 2013) and reference lists of identified studies.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of vaginal examinations (including digital assessment of the consistency of the cervix, and the degree of dilation and position of the opening of the uterus (cervical os); and position and station of the fetal presenting part, with or without abdominal palpation) compared with other ways of assessing progress of labour. We also included studies assessing different timings of vaginal examinations. We excluded quasi-RCTs and cross-over trials. We also excluded trials with a primary focus on assessing progress of labour using the partogram (of which vaginal examinations is one component) as this is covered by another Cochrane review. However, studies where vaginal examinations were used within the context of the partogram were included if the studies were randomised according to the vaginal examination component.

Data collection and analysis

Three review authors assessed the studies for inclusion in the review. Two authors undertook independent data extraction and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. A third review author also checked data extraction and risk of bias. Data entry was checked.

Main results

We found two studies that met our inclusion criteria but they were of unclear quality. One study, involving 307 women, compared vaginal examinations with rectal examinations, and the other study, involving 150 women, compared two-hourly with four-hourly vaginal examinations. Both studies were of unclear quality in terms of risk of selection bias, and the study comparing the timing of the vaginal examinations excluded 27% (two hourly) to 28% (four hourly) of women after randomisation because they no longer met the inclusion criteria.

When comparing routine vaginal examinations with routine rectal examinations to assess the progress of labour, we identified no difference in neonatal infections requiring antibiotics (risk ratio (RR) 0.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 8.07, one study, 307 infants). There were no data on the other primary outcomes of length of labour, maternal infections requiring antibiotics and women's overall views of labour. The study did show that significantly fewer women reported that vaginal examination was very uncomfortable compared with rectal examinations (RR 0.42, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.70, one study, 303 women). We identified no difference in the secondary outcomes of augmentation, caesarean section, spontaneous vaginal birth, operative vaginal birth, perinatal mortality and admission to neonatal intensive care.

Comparing two-hourly vaginal examinations with four-hourly vaginal examinations in labour, we found no difference in length of labour (mean difference in minutes (MD) -6.00, 95% CI -88.70 to 76.70, one study, 109 women). There were no data on the other primary outcomes of maternal or neonatal infections requiring antibiotics, and women's overall views of labour. We identified no difference in the secondary outcomes of augmentation, epidural for pain relief, caesarean section, spontaneous vaginal birth and operative vaginal birth.

Authors' conclusions

On the basis of women's preferences, vaginal examination seems to be preferred to rectal examination. For all other outcomes, we found no evidence to support or reject the use of routine vaginal examinations in labour to improve outcomes for women and babies. The two studies included in the review were both small, and carried out in high-income countries in the 1990s.  It is surprising that there is such a widespread use of this intervention without good evidence of effectiveness, particularly considering the sensitivity of the procedure for the women receiving it, and the potential for adverse consequences in some settings.

The effectiveness of the use and timing of routine vaginal examinations in labour, and other ways of assessing progress in labour, including maternal behavioural cues, should be the focus of new research as a matter of urgency. Women's views of ways of assessing labour progress should be given high priority in any future research in this area.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Routine vaginal examinations in labour

For a baby to be born, the mother's cervix needs to change from being closed to being open to about 10 centimetres (‘dilated’). Vaginal examinations provide information on how widely dilated the cervix is, how much it has thinned and the position of the presenting part of the baby in the mother's pelvis. This is part of assessing the woman's progress in labour, although knowing the dilation of the woman's cervix is a poor predictor of when she will give birth. Patterns and speed of labour can vary substantially between different women, and in the same woman in different labours. Very slow labours can be associated with difficulties for both the mother and baby. Abnormally slow labours (dystocia) can sometimes lead to neurological problems in the baby and long-term urinary and fecal incontinence in the mother, especially in low-income countries. Vaginal examinations aim to reassure the woman (and staff) that the woman is labouring normally, and to provide early warning if this is not the case. In low-income countries, it can take some time to get to help, and vaginal examinations may enable appropriate transfer from community settings to hospital care. If labours that are slow, but not abnormal, are mis-diagnosed as being abnormal, this can lead to unnecessary interventions such as drugs to try to speed labour on or caesarean section or forceps for giving birth. There are also concerns about introducing infection to the uterus and to the baby, especially in low-income countries where disposable gloves, or reusable gloves and disinfectants, are not readily available. In addition, some women find the process of vaginal examinations uncomfortable or distressing, and so it is important that there is good evidence for its use. We looked for studies to see how effective routine vaginal examinations in labour are at reducing problems for mothers and babies.

We found two studies, undertaken in the 1990s in high-income countries, but their quality was unclear. One study, involving 307 women, compared routine vaginal and rectal examinations in labour. Here, fewer women reported that vaginal examinations were very uncomfortable compared with rectal examinations. The other study, involving 150 women, compared two-hourly and four-hourly vaginal examinations, but no difference in outcomes was seen.

We identified no convincing evidence to support, or reject, the use of routine vaginal examinations in labour, yet this is common practice throughout the world. More research is needed to find out if vaginal examinations are a useful measure of both normal and abnormal labour progress. If vaginal examination is not a good measure of progress, there is an urgent need to identify and evaluate an alternative measure to ensure the best outcome for mothers and babies.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Examen vaginal de routine pour évaluer la progression du travail en vue d'améliorer les résultats chez les femmes et les bébés nés à terme

Contexte

L'examen vaginal est devenu une intervention de routine pendant le travail comme méthode d'évaluation de la progression du travail. Utilisé à intervalles réguliers, soit seul soit en tant que composante du partogramme (représentation graphique, décrivant les diverses étapes de la progression du travail), son objectif est d'évaluer si le travail progresse normalement sur le plan physiologique, et de servir d'alarme précoce en cas de progression lente. Une progression anormalement lente peut être un signe de dystocie du travail, qui est associée à une morbidité et une mortalité maternelles et fœtales, notamment dans les pays à faible revenu où les interventions appropriées ne sont pas facilement accessibles. Toutefois, le sur-diagnostic de la dystocie peut entraîner une morbidité iatrogénique en raison d'une intervention inutile (par exemple accouchement opératoire par voie basse ou césarienne). Il est, par conséquent, important de déterminer si la pratique en routine de l'examen vaginal est une intervention efficace, tant comme outil de diagnostic d'une véritable dystocie du travail, que comme mesure précise de la progression du travail physiologique.

Objectifs

Comparer l'efficacité, l'acceptabilité et les conséquences d'un examen vaginal digital (seul ou dans le contexte du partogramme) à d'autres stratégies, ou à des calendriers différents, afin d'évaluer la progression pendant le travail à terme.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre d'essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la grossesse et la naissance (jeudi 28 février 2013) et les bibliographies des études identifiées.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) portant sur l'examen vaginal (incluant l'évaluation digitale de la consistance du col, et le degré de dilatation et la position de l'ouverture de l'utérus (orifice cervical) ; et la position et la station du repère de la présentation fœtale, avec ou sans palpation abdominale) par rapport à d'autres méthodes d'évaluation de la progression du travail. Nous avons également inclus des études évaluant les différents calendriers d'examen vaginal. Nous avons exclu les quasi-ECR et les essais croisés. Nous avons également exclu les essais dont l'intérêt premier était centré sur l'évaluation de la progression du travail en utilisant le partogramme (dont l'examen vaginal n'est qu'une composante) étant donné que celui-ci sera abordé dans une autre revue Cochrane. Toutefois, les études dans lesquelles l'examen vaginal a été utilisé dans le contexte du partogramme ont été incluses si elles avaient été randomisées selon la composante examen vaginal.

Recueil et analyse des données

Trois auteurs ont évalué les études à inclure dans la revue. Deux auteurs ont, de façon indépendante, évalué les risques de biais de chaque étude incluse et extrait les données. Un troisième auteur de la revue a aussi vérifié les données extraites et le risque de biais. La saisie des donnés a été vérifiée.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons trouvé deux études qui répondaient à nos critères d'inclusion mais leur qualité méthodologique était incertaine. Une étude, totalisant 307 femmes, a comparé l'examen vaginal à l'examen rectal, et l'autre étude, totalisant 150 femmes, a comparé un examen vaginal effectué toutes les deux heures et un toutes les quatre heures. La qualité méthodologique des deux études était incertaine en ce qui concerne le risque de biais de sélection, et l'étude comparant le calendrier de l'examen vaginal a exclu 27 % (toutes les deux heures) à 28 % (toutes les quatre heures) des femmes après la randomisation parce qu'elles ne répondaient plus aux critères d'inclusion.

La comparaison de l'examen vaginal de routine à l'examen rectal de routine afin d'évaluer la progression du travail ne nous a pas permis d'identifier de différence au niveau des infections néonatales nécessitant l'administration d'antibiotiques (risque relatif (RR) 0,33, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,01 à 8,07, une étude, 307 nourrissons). Il n'existait aucune donnée sur les autres résultats principaux relatifs à la durée du travail, aux infections maternelles nécessitant l'administration d'antibiotiques et au point de vue global des femmes sur le travail. L'étude n'a pas démontré qu'il y avait un nombre significativement réduit de femmes ayant signalé que l'examen vaginal était très inconfortable comparé à l'examen rectal (RR 0,42, IC à 95 % 0,25 à 0,70, une étude, 303 femmes). Nous n'avons identifié aucune différence au niveau des résultats secondaires relatifs à l'augmentation, à la césarienne, à l'accouchement spontané par voie basse, à l'accouchement opératoire par voie basse, à la mortalité périnatale et à l'admission en unité néonatale de soins intensifs.

Dans la comparaison de l'examen vaginal effectué toutes les deux heures et toutes les quatre heures pendant le travail, nous n'avons trouvé aucune différence au niveau de la durée du travail (différence moyenne en minutes (DM) -6,00, IC à 95 % -88,70 à 76,70, une étude, 109 femmes). Il n'existait aucune donnée sur les autres résultats principaux relatifs aux infections maternelles et néonatales nécessitant l'administration d'antibiotiques et au point de vue global des femmes sur le travail. Nous n'avons identifié aucune différence au niveau des résultats secondaires relatifs à l'augmentation, à la péridurale pour soulager la douleur, à la césarienne, à l'accouchement spontané par voie basse et à l'accouchement opératoire par voie basse.

Conclusions des auteurs

D'après les préférences des femmes, l'examen vaginal semble être préféré à l'examen rectal. Pour tous les autres résultats, nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve pour soutenir, ou réfuter, la réalisation de l'examen vaginal de routine pendant le travail pour améliorer les résultats chez les femmes et leurs bébés. Les deux études incluses dans la revue étaient de petite taille, et ont été menées dans des pays à haut revenu dans les années 1990.  Il est surprenant de constater que l'utilisation de cette intervention est généralisée alors même que l'on ne dispose d'aucune preuve probante de son efficacité, en particulier en ce concerne la sensibilité de la procédure pour les femmes la subissant, et le risque potentiel de conséquences indésirables dans certains contextes.

L'efficacité de l'utilisation et du calendrier de l'examen vaginal de routine pendant le travail, et d'autres méthodes d'évaluation de la progression du travail, incluant les indices comportementaux maternels, devra constituer l'intérêt central des nouvelles recherches dans les meilleurs délais. Toutes les futures recherches effectuées dans ce domaine devront accorder la priorité au point de vue des femmes sur les méthodes d'évaluation de la progression du travail.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Examen vaginal de routine pour évaluer la progression du travail en vue d'améliorer les résultats chez les femmes et les bébés nés à terme

Examen vaginal de routine pendant le travail

Pour qu'un bébé puisse naître, le col de la mère a besoin de changer d'un état fermé à un état ouvert sur environ 10 centimètres (« dilaté »). L'examen vaginal permet d'obtenir des informations sur la largeur de la dilatation du col, son degré d'assouplissement et la position du repère de la présentation fœtale dans le bassin maternel. Cela fait partie de l'évaluation de la progression du travail chez la femme, même si le fait de savoir que la dilatation du col de la femme constitue un mauvais prédicteur du moment où elle accouchera. Les schémas et la vitesse de travail peuvent considérablement varier entre les femmes, et chez la même femme pendant le travail lors des différentes grossesses. Un travail très lent peut être associé à des difficultés à la fois chez la mère et le bébé. Un travail anormalement lent (dystocie) peut parfois entraîner des problèmes neurologiques chez le bébé et une incontinence urinaire et une incontinence fécale à long terme chez la mère, notamment dans les pays à faible revenu. L'examen vaginal a pour but de rassurer la femme (et le personnel) sur le fait que la mère est en phase de travail normal, et de lancer une alarme précoce si tel n'est pas le cas. Dans les pays à faible revenu, il faut parfois un certain temps pour obtenir de l'aide, et l'examen vaginal peut faciliter un transfert approprié depuis des cadres communautaires vers une prise en charge à l'hôpital. Si le travail qui est lent, mais pas anormal, est mal diagnostiqué comme étant anormal, cela peut conduire à des interventions inutiles telles que l'administration de médicaments en vue d'accélérer le travail ou la réalisation d'une césarienne ou l'utilisation de forceps pour faciliter la naissance du bébé. L'introduction d'une infection dans l'utérus et chez le bébé suscite également des inquiétudes, notamment dans les pays à faible revenu où les gants jetables, ou les gants réutilisables et les désinfectants ne sont pas faciles à obtenir. En outre, certaines femmes trouvent le processus de l'examen vaginal inconfortable ou pénible, c'est pourquoi il est important de disposer de preuves de bonne qualité pour justifier son utilisation. Nous avons examiné les études pour déterminer dans quelle mesure l'examen vaginal de routine pendant le travail est efficace pour réduire les problèmes chez les mères et leurs bébés.

Nous avons trouvé deux études, menées dans les années 1990 dans des pays à haut revenu, mais leur qualité était incertaine. Une étude, totalisant 307 femmes, a comparé l'examen rectal et l'examen vaginal de routine pendant le travail. Ici, un nombre réduit de femmes ont rapporté que l'examen vaginal était très inconfortable comparé à l'examen rectal. L'autre étude, totalisant 150 femmes, a comparé un examen vaginal effectué toutes les deux heures et un toutes les quatre heures, mais aucune différence n'a été observée au niveau des critères de jugement.

Nous n'avons identifié aucune preuve convaincante pour soutenir, ou réfuter, la réalisation de l'examen vaginal de routine pendant le travail, pourtant il s'agit d'une pratique courante partout dans le monde. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires afin de déterminer si l'examen vaginal est une mesure utile de la progression du travail à la fois normale et anormale. Si l'examen vaginal n'est pas une mesure adaptée de la progression, il est alors urgent d'identifier et d'évaluer une autre mesure possible pour garantir la meilleure issue chez les mères et leurs bébés.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 4th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.