Intervention Review

Psychological therapies (Internet-delivered) for the management of chronic pain in adults

  1. Christopher Eccleston1,*,
  2. Emma Fisher1,
  3. Lorraine Craig2,
  4. Geoffrey B Duggan1,
  5. Benjamin A Rosser3,
  6. Edmund Keogh4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group

Published Online: 26 FEB 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 13 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010152.pub2


How to Cite

Eccleston C, Fisher E, Craig L, Duggan GB, Rosser BA, Keogh E. Psychological therapies (Internet-delivered) for the management of chronic pain in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD010152. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010152.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Bath, Centre for Pain Research, Bath, UK

  2. 2

    University of Bath, Department of Health, Bath, UK

  3. 3

    University of Exeter, Exeter, UK

  4. 4

    University of Bath, Department of Psychology, Bath, UK

*Christopher Eccleston, Centre for Pain Research, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath, BA2 7AY, UK. papas@bath.ac.uk. c.eccleston@bath.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 26 FEB 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Chronic pain (i.e. pain lasting longer than three months) is common. Psychological therapies (e.g. cognitive behavioural therapy) can help people to cope with pain, depression and disability that can occur with such pain. Treatments currently are delivered via hospital out-patient consultation (face-to-face) or more recently through the Internet. This review looks at the evidence for psychological therapies delivered via the Internet for adults with chronic pain.

Objectives

Our objective was to evaluate whether Internet-delivered psychological therapies improve pain symptoms, reduce disability, and improve depression and anxiety for adults with chronic pain. Secondary outcomes included satisfaction with treatment/treatment acceptability and quality of life.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO from inception to November 2013 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating psychological therapies delivered via the Internet to adults with a chronic pain condition. Potential RCTs were also identified from reference lists of included studies and relevant review articles. In addition, RCTs were also searched for in trial registries.

Selection criteria

Peer-reviewed RCTs were identified and read in full for inclusion. We included studies if they used the Internet to deliver the primary therapy, contained sufficient psychotherapeutic content, and promoted self-management of chronic pain. Studies were excluded if the number of participants in any arm of the trial was less than 20 at the point of extraction.

Data collection and analysis

Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria and data were extracted. Risk of bias assessments were conducted for all included studies. We categorised studies by condition (headache or non-headache conditions). Four primary outcomes; pain symptoms, disability, depression, and anxiety, and two secondary outcomes; satisfaction/acceptability and quality of life were extracted for each study immediately post-treatment and at follow-up (defined as 3 to 12 months post-treatment).

Main results

Fifteen studies (N= 2012) were included in analyses. We assessed the risk of bias for included studies as low overall. We identified nine high 'risk of bias' assessments, 22 unclear, and 59 low 'risk of bias' assessments. Most judgements of a high risk of bias were due to inadequate reporting.

Analyses revealed seven effects. Participants with headache conditions receiving psychological therapies delivered via the Internet had reduced pain (number needed to treat to benefit = 2.72, risk ratio 7.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.67 to 19.84, p < 0.01) and a moderate effect was found for disability post-treatment (standardised mean difference (SMD) ‒0.65, 95% CI ‒0.91 to ‒0.39, p < 0.01). However, only two studies could be entered into each analysis; hence, findings should be interpreted with caution. There was no clear evidence that psychological therapies improved depression or anxiety post-treatment (SMD −0.26, 95% CI −0.87 to 0.36, p > 0.05; SMD −0.48, 95% CI −1.22 to 0.27, p > 0.05), respectively. In participants with non-headache conditions, psychological therapies improved pain post-treatment (p < 0.01) with a small effect size (SMD −0.37, 95% CI −0.59 to −0.15), disability post-treatment (p < 0.01) with a moderate effect size (SMD −0.50, 95% CI −0.79 to −0.20), and disability at follow-up (p < 0.05) with a small effect size (SMD −0.15, 95% CI −0.28 to −0.01). However, the follow-up analysis included only two studies and should be interpreted with caution. A small effect was found for depression and anxiety post-treatment (SMD −0.19, 95% CI −0.35 to −0.04, p < 0.05; SMD −0.28, 95% CI −0.49 to −0.06, p < 0.01), respectively. No clear evidence of benefit was found for other follow-up analyses. Analyses of adverse effects were not possible.

No data were presented on satisfaction/acceptability. Only one study could be included in an analysis of the effect of psychological therapies on quality of life in participants with headache conditions; hence, no analysis could be undertaken. Three studies presented quality of life data for participants with non-headache conditions; however, no clear evidence of benefit was found (SMD −0.27, 95% CI −0.54 to 0.01, p > 0.05).

Authors' conclusions

There is insufficient evidence to make conclusions regarding the efficacy of psychological therapies delivered via the Internet in participants with headache conditions. Psychological therapies reduced pain and disability post-treatment; however, no clear evidence of benefit was found for depression and anxiety. For participants with non-headache conditions, psychological therapies delivered via the Internet reduced pain, disability, depression, and anxiety post-treatment. The positive effects on disability were maintained at follow-up. These effects are promising, but considerable uncertainty remains around the estimates of effect. These results come from a small number of trials, with mostly wait-list controls, no reports of adverse events, and non-clinical recruitment methods. Due to the novel method of delivery, the satisfaction and acceptability of these therapies should be explored in this population. These results are similar to those of reviews of traditional face-to-face therapies for chronic pain.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Psychological therapies delivered via the Internet for adults with longstanding distressing pain and disability

Chronic pain (i.e. pain lasting longer than three months) is common. Psychological therapies (e.g. cognitive behavioural therapy) can help people to cope with pain, depression and disability that can occur with such pain. Treatments currently are delivered via hospital out-patient consultation (face-to-face) or more recently through the Internet. This review looks at the evidence for psychological therapies delivered via the Internet for adults with chronic pain.

Four databases were searched up to November 2013. We found 15 trials that met our inclusion criteria. Four trials included individuals with headache pain, 10 trials included individuals with non-headache pain, and one trial included individuals with both headache and non-headache pain. We looked at data about pain, disability, depression, and anxiety immediately after the end of treatment and between 3 to 12 months follow-up. We also looked at how satisfied people were with the treatments, and its effects on their quality of life.

We found that for people with headache pain, pain symptoms and disability scores improved immediately following the end of treatment. However, only two trials could be entered into each of these analyses and so findings should be treated with caution. For people with non-headache pain, pain, disability, depression, and anxiety improved immediately after the end of treatment. Disability was also improved at follow-up. Only one study recorded quality of life scores in individuals with headache pain, so we were unable to analyse the results. Three studies presented quality of life scores for individuals with non-headache pain immediately following treatment. We did not find that quality of life improved after receiving the therapy. No data could be analysed on treatment satisfaction/acceptability.

We conclude that these findings are promising for psychological treatments delivered via the Internet for the management of chronic pain in adults, but more trials are needed to determine the efficacy of such therapies.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Psychothérapies (sur internet) pour la prise en charge de la douleur chronique chez l'adulte

Contexte

La douleur chronique (douleur durant plus de trois mois) est fréquente. Les psychothérapies (par exemple la thérapie cognitivo-comportementale) peuvent aider les personnes à faire face à la douleur, à la dépression et à l'incapacité que ce genre de douleur peut occasionner. Les traitements sont aujourd'hui délivrés en consultation externe à l'hôpital (en face à face) ou, plus récemment, via internet. Cette revue examine les preuves sur les psychothérapies via internet pour les adultes souffrant de douleur chronique.

Objectifs

Notre objectif était d'évaluer si les psychothérapies sur internet améliorent les symptômes de la douleur, réduisent l'incapacité et améliorent la dépression et l'anxiété chez les adultes souffrant de douleur chronique. Les critères de jugement secondaires incluaient la satisfaction vis-à-vis du traitement / l'acceptabilité du traitement et la qualité de vie.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL (Bibliothèque Cochrane), MEDLINE, EMBASE et PsycINFO de leur création jusqu'à novembre 2013 pour les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) étudiant des thérapies psychologiques sur internet pour les adultes atteints d'une pathologie de douleur chronique. Des ECR potentiels ont également été identifiés dans les références bibliographiques des études incluses et des articles de revue pertinents. En outre, des ECR ont été également recherchés dans les registres d'essais.

Critères de sélection

Les ECR évalués par les pairs ont été identifiés et lus dans leur intégralité pour l'inclusion. Nous avons inclus les études si elles utilisaient l'internet pour délivrer le traitement primaire, avaient un contenu psychothérapeutique suffisant, et encourageaint la prise en charge de la douleur chronique par le patient lui-même. Les études ont été exclues si le nombre de participants dans n'importe quel groupe de l'essai était moins de 20 au point d'extraction des données.

Recueil et analyse des données

Quinze études remplissaient les critères d'inclusion et les données ont été extraites. Les évaluations des risques de biais ont été réalisées pour toutes les études incluses. Nous avons classé les études par affection (céphalées ou autre affection). Les données sur quatre critères de jugement principaux - symptômes de la douleur, incapacité, dépression et anxiété - ainsi que deux critères de jugement secondaires - satisfaction/acceptabilité et qualité de vie - ont été extraites pour chaque étude, immédiatement après le traitement et lors du suivi (défini comme étant de 3 à 12 mois après le traitement).

Résultats Principaux

Quinze études (N = 2012) ont été incluses dans les analyses. Nous avons évalué le risque de biais des études incluses comme étant faible dans l'ensemble. Nous avons identifié neuf évaluations comme étant à risque élevé de biais, 22 dont le risque de biais était incertain et 59 à risque faible. La plupart des évaluations à risque élevé de biais l'étaient en raison d'une documentation inadéquate.

Les analyses ont révélé sept effets. Les participants souffrant de céphalées bénéficiant d'une psychothérapie sur internet avaient une douleur réduite (nombre de sujets à traiter pour observer un bénéfice du traitement = 2,72, risque relatif 7,28, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 2,67 à 19,84, p < 0,01) et un effet modéré a été observé pour l'incapacité après le traitement (différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) ‒0,65, IC à 95 % ‒0,91 à ‒0,39, p < 0,01). Toutefois, seules deux études ont pu être incluses dans chaque analyse ; par conséquent, les résultats doivent être interprétés avec prudence. Il n'y avait aucune preuve claire que les psychothérapies apportaient une amélioration de la dépression ou de l'anxiété après le traitement (DMS -0,26, IC à 95 % -0,87 à 0,36, p > 0,05 ; DMS -0,48, IC à 95 % -1,22 à 0,27, p > 0,05), respectivement. Chez les participants atteints d'autres types de douleurs que les céphalées, les psychothérapies ont apporté une amélioration de la douleur après traitement (p < 0,01) par un effet de petite taille (DMS -0,37, IC à 95 % -0,59 à -0,15), l'incapacité après le traitement (p < 0,01) par un effet de taille modérée (DMS -0,50, IC à 95 % -0,79 à -0,20), et l'incapacité lors du suivi (p < 0,05) par un effet de petite taille (DMS -0,15, IC à 95 % -0,28 à -0,01). Cependant, l'analyse du suivi incluait seulement deux études et doit être interprétée avec prudence. Un petit effet a été observé pour la dépression et l'anxiété après le traitement (DMS -0,19, IC à 95 % -0,35 à -0,04, p < 0,05; DMS -0,28, IC à 95 % -0,49 à -0,06, p < 0,01), respectivement. Aucune preuve claire de bénéfice n'a été observé pour les autres analyses de suivi. Il n'a pas été possible de conduire des analyses des effets indésirables.

Aucune donnée n'était présentée sur la satisfaction / l'acceptabilité. Une seule étude a pu être incluse dans une analyse de l'effet des psychothérapies sur la qualité de vie chez les participants souffrant de céphalées ; par conséquent, aucune analyse n'a pu être effectuée. Trois études présentaient des données sur la qualité de vie pour les participants atteints d'autres affections que les céphalées ; cependant, aucune preuve claire de bénéfice n'a été observée (DMS -0,27, IC à 95 % -0,54 à 0,01, p > 0,05).

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves pour formuler des conclusions concernant l'efficacité des psychothérapies sur internet chez des participants souffrant de céphalées. Les psychothérapies ont réduit la douleur et d'incapacité après le traitement ; toutefois, aucune preuve de bénéfice n'a été observée pour la dépression et l'anxiété. Pour les participants atteints d'autres affections que les céphalées, les psychothérapies sur internet ont réduit la douleur, l'incapacité, la dépression et l'anxiété après le traitement. Les effets positifs sur l'incapacité ont été maintenus lors du suivi. Ces effets sont prometteurs, mais il subsiste une incertitude considérable dans les estimations d'effet. Ces résultats proviennent d'un petit nombre d'essais, avec pour la plupart des groupes témoins sur liste d'attente, aucune notification d'événements indésirables, et des méthodes de recrutement non cliniques. En raison de la nouvelle méthode d'administration, la satisfaction et l'acceptabilité de ces thérapies doivent être étudiées dans cette population. Ces résultats sont similaires à ceux des revues sur les thérapies classiques en face à face pour la douleur chronique.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Psychothérapies (sur internet) pour la prise en charge de la douleur chronique chez l'adulte

Les psychothérapies sur internet pour les adultes souffrant de douleurs et d'incapacité éprouvantes de longue durée

La douleur chronique (c'est-à-dire la douleur durant plus de trois mois) est fréquente. Les thérapies psychologiques (par exemple la thérapie cognitivo-comportementale) peuvent aider les personnes à faire face à la douleur, à la dépression et à l'incapacité que ce genre de douleur peut occasionner. Les traitements sont aujourd'hui délivrés en consultation externe à l'hôpital (en face à face) ou, plus récemment, via internet. Cette revue examine les preuves sur les psychothérapies via internet pour les adultes souffrant de douleur chronique.

Quatre bases de données ont été recherchées jusqu'à novembre 2013. Nous avons trouvé 15 essais qui répondaient à nos critères d'inclusion. Quatre essais portaient sur des patients souffrant de maux de tête, 10 essais sur des patients atteints d'autres types de douleurs que les maux de tête, et un essai incluait des individus souffrant de maux de tête et d'autres types de douleurs. Nous avons examiné les données sur la douleur, l'incapacité, la dépression et l'anxiété immédiatement après la fin du traitement et entre 3 et 12 mois de suivi. Nous avons également analysé la satisfaction des participants vis-à-vis des traitements, et les effets sur leur qualité de vie.

Nous avons constaté que pour les personnes souffrant de maux de tête, les symptômes de la douleur et les scores d'incapacité se sont améliorés immédiatement après la fin du traitement. Cependant, seuls deux essais ont pu être inclus dans chacune de ces analyses et les résultats doivent donc être considérés avec prudence. Pour les personnes atteintes de douleurs autres que les maux de tête, la douleur, l'incapacité, la dépression et l'anxiété se sont améliorées immédiatement après la fin du traitement. L'incapacité s'est également améliorée lors du suivi. Une seule étude ayant enregistré les scores de qualité de vie chez les individus souffrant de maux de tête, nous ne sommes pas en mesure d'analyser ces résultats. Trois études présentaient des scores de qualité de vie pour les individus atteints de douleurs autres que les maux de tête immédiatement après la fin du traitement. Nous n'avons pas trouvé d'amélioration de la qualité de vie après la thérapie. Aucune donnée n'a pu être analysée sur la satisfaction vis-à-vis du traitement ou son acceptabilité.

Nous en concluons que ces résultats sont prometteurs pour les traitements psychologiques sur internet pour la prise en charge de la douleur chronique chez l'adulte, mais des essais supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour déterminer l'efficacité de ces thérapies.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé