Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Occupational safety and health enforcement tools for preventing occupational diseases and injuries

  1. Christina Mischke1,*,
  2. Jos H Verbeek1,
  3. Jenny Job2,
  4. Thais C Morata3,
  5. Anne Alvesalo-Kuusi4,
  6. Kaisa Neuvonen5,
  7. Simon Clarke6,
  8. Robert I Pedlow7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Group

Published Online: 30 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 20 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010183.pub2


How to Cite

Mischke C, Verbeek JH, Job J, Morata TC, Alvesalo-Kuusi A, Neuvonen K, Clarke S, Pedlow RI. Occupational safety and health enforcement tools for preventing occupational diseases and injuries. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD010183. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010183.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Review Group, Kuopio, Finland

  2. 2

    Safe Work Australia, Strategic Policy Branch, Canberra, ACT, Australia

  3. 3

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Cincinnati, OH, USA

  4. 4

    University of Turku, Faculty of Law, Turku, Finland

  5. 5

    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Review Group, Helsinki, Finland

  6. 6

    UK Health and Safety Executive, Merseyside, UK

  7. 7

    Safe Work Australia, Research and Evaluation Team, Canberra, ACT, Australia

*Christina Mischke, Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Review Group, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Neulaniementie 4, PO Box 310, Kuopio, 70101, Finland. christina.mischke@ttl.fi. tinamischke@gmx.de.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 30 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

There is uncertainty as to whether and what extent occupational safety and health regulation and legislation enforcement activities, such as inspections, are effective and efficient to improve workers' health and safety. We use the term regulation to refer both to regulation and legislation.

Objectives

To assess the effects of occupational safety and health regulation enforcement tools for preventing occupational diseases and injuries.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE (embase.com), CINAHL (EBSCO), PsycINFO (Ovid), OSH update, HeinOnline, Westlaw International, EconLit and Scopus from the inception of each database until January 2013. We also checked reference lists of included articles and contacted study authors to identify additional published, unpublished and ongoing studies.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled before-after studies (CBAs), interrupted time series (ITS) and econometric panel studies of firms or workplaces evaluating inspections, warnings or orders, citations or fines, prosecution or firm closure by governmental representatives and if the outcomes were injuries, diseases or exposures.

In addition, we included qualitative studies of workers' or employers' attitudes or beliefs towards enforcement tools.

Data collection and analysis

Pairs of authors independently extracted data on the main characteristics, the risk of bias and the effects of the interventions. We expressed intervention effects as risk ratios (RR) or mean differences (MD). We recalculated other effect measures into RRs or MDs. We combined the results of similar studies in a meta-analysis.

Main results

We located 23 studies: two RCTs with 1414 workplaces, two CBAs with 9903 workplaces, one ITS with six outcome measurements, 12 panel studies and six qualitative studies with 310 participants. Studies evaluated the effects of inspections in general and the effects of their consequences, such as penalties. Studies on the effects of prosecution, warnings or closure were not available or were of such quality that we could not include their results. The effect was measured on injury rates, on exposure to physical workload and on compliance with regulation, with a follow-up varying from one to four years. All studies had serious limitations and therefore the quality of the evidence was low to very low. The injury rates in the control groups varied across studies from 1 to 23 injuries per 100 person-years and compliance rates varied from 40% to 75% being compliant.

The effects of inspections were inconsistent in seven studies: injury rates decreased or stayed at a similar level compared to no intervention at short and medium-term follow-up. In studies that found a decrease the effect was small with a 10% decrease of the injury rate. At long-term follow-up, in one study there was a significant decrease of 23% (95% confidence interval 8% to 23%) in injury rates and in another study a substantial decrease in accident rates, both compared to no intervention.

First inspections, follow-up inspections, complaint and accident inspections resulted in higher compliance rates compared to the average effect of any other type of inspections.

In small firms, inspections with citations or with more penalties could result in fewer injuries or more compliance in the short term but not in the medium term.

Longer inspections and more frequent inspections probably do not result in more compliance.

In two studies, there was no adverse effect of inspections on firm survival, employment or sales.

Qualitative studies show that there is support for enforcement among workers. However, workers doubt if the inspections are effective because inspections are rare and violations can be temporarily fixed to mislead inspectors.

Authors' conclusions

There is evidence that inspections decrease injuries in the long term but not in the short term. The magnitude of the effect is uncertain. There are no studies that used chemical or physical exposures as outcome. Specific, focused inspections could have larger effects than inspections in general. The effect of fines and penalties is uncertain. The quality of the evidence is low to very low and therefore these conclusions are tentative and can be easily changed by better future studies. There is an urgent need for better designed evaluations, such as pragmatic randomised trials, to establish the effects of existing and novel enforcement methods, especially on exposure and disorders.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Inspections to prevent occupational diseases and injuries

In most countries, government-related inspectors check if workplaces comply with regulation, such as WorkSafeBC in British Columbia in Canada, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) in the USA or the Labour Inspectorate in other countries. Inspections are costly and do not reach all workplaces. It is unclear how effectively these inspections reduce occupational diseases and injuries.

To review the evidence on the effect of inspections we searched for studies until January 2013.

We found 23 studies. Two studies were randomised controlled trials with 1414 workplaces. Fifteen non-randomised studies analysed injury rates of firms obtained from large administrative databases. Six studies with more than 340 participants in total reported on the opinions of workers or employers.

Two studies randomly allocated inspections or no inspections to workplaces. After one year follow-up the non-fatal injury rate in one study and the frequency of physical overload in the other study were still similar in both study groups. Another five similar but lower quality studies had inconsistent results at short and medium-term follow-up. Two other non-randomised studies found that after more than three years inspections decreased injuries and accidents by 23% compared to no inspections and there was no effect on the firms' productivity.

Specific inspections resulted in higher compliance rates. Inspections with penalties could result in fewer injuries and more compliance in the short term in small firms. Longer inspections and more frequent inspections probably do not result in more compliance.

Two studies did not find a harmful effect of inspections on firm lifetime or employment.

Qualitative studies showed that there is support for enforcement among workers. However, workers doubt if inspections are effective because they are rare and violations can be temporarily fixed to mislead the inspectors.

We concluded that inspections decrease injuries in the long term but probably not in the short term. The evidence is of low to very low quality because the results across studies are inconsistent and studies are observational and do not take into account other factors that could affect the results. In addition, the magnitude of the effect is uncertain because it varies from a 3 to 23 per cent decrease in injury rates. Because the quality of the evidence is low, future studies can easily change our conclusions. There is an urgent need for large-scale randomised trials to evaluate different types of inspection methods on exposure, disorders and injuries.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Outils de mise en application de la réglementation relative à la santé et à la sécurité au travail pour la prévention des maladies professionnelles et des accidents du travail

Contexte

On ignore encore si, et dans quelle mesure, la réglementation relative à la santé et à la sécurité au travail et les dispositions pour mettre en application la législation, telles que les inspections, sont efficaces et fructueuses pour améliorer la santé et la sécurité au travail des travailleurs. Nous utilisons le terme « réglementation » pour désigner à la fois la réglementation et la législation.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des outils de mise en application de la réglementation relative à la santé et à la sécurité au travail pour la prévention des maladies professionnelles et des accidents du travail.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE (embase.com), CINAHL (EBSCO), PsycINFO (Ovid), OSH mis à jour, HeinOnline, Westlaw International, EconLit et Scopus depuis l'origine de chaque base de données jusqu'à janvier 2013. Nous avons aussi vérifié les listes bibliographiques des articles inclus et contacté les auteurs des études afin d'identifier des études supplémentaires publiées, non publiées et en cours.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), les études contrôlées avant-après (CAA), les études de séries temporelles interrompues (STI) et les études d'économétrie des données de panel portant sur des entreprises ou des lieux de travail, ayant évalué les inspections, les avertissements ou les commandements, les sanctions ou les amendes, les poursuites ou les fermetures d'entreprise par des représentants gouvernementaux et lorsque les critères mesurés étaient les accidents du travail, les maladies ou les expositions professionnelles.

En outre, nous avons inclus les études qualitatives portant sur les attitudes des travailleurs ou des employés ou sur leurs opinions sur les outils de mise en application de la réglementation.

Recueil et analyse des données

Des auteurs deux par deux ont indépendamment extrait les données sur les principales caractéristiques, le risque de biais et les effets des interventions. Nous avons exprimé les effets des interventions sous la forme de risques relatifs (RR) ou de différences moyennes (DM). Nous avons recalculé d'autres mesures d'effet sous la forme de RR ou de DM. Nous avons combiné les résultats des études comparables dans une méta-analyse.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié 23 études : deux ECR portant sur 1 414 lieux de travail, deux études contrôlées avant-après (CAA) portant sur 9 903 lieux de travail, une étude de séries temporelles interrompues (STI) avec six résultats mesurés, 12 études de données de panel et six études qualitatives avec 310 participants. Les études ont évalué les effets des inspections d'ordre général et les effets de leurs conséquences, comme les pénalités. Les études sur les effets des poursuites, des avertissements ou des fermetures n'étaient pas disponibles ou étaient d'une qualité insuffisante qui nous a empêché d'inclure leurs résultats. L'effet a été mesuré sur les taux d'accidents de travail, sur l'exposition au surmenage physique et sur le respect des dispositions légales, avec un suivi variant d'un an à quatre ans. Toutes les études comportaient de graves limitations et par conséquent la qualité des preuves était faible à très faible. Les taux d'accidents du travail dans les groupes témoins variaient entre les études de 1 à 23 accidents pour 100 personnes-années et les taux de respect des dispositions légales variaient de 40 % à 75 % de conformité.

Les effets des inspections étaient contradictoires dans sept études : les taux d'accidents du travail ont baissé ou sont restés à un niveau similaire comparativement à l'absence d'intervention au bout du suivi à court terme et à moyen terme. Dans les études qui ont détecté une baisse, l'effet était petit avec une baisse de 10 % du taux d'accidents du travail. À l'issue du suivi à long terme, dans une étude, il y avait une baisse significative de 23 % (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %, 8 % à 23 %) des taux d'accidents du travail et dans une autre étude, une baisse substantielle des taux d'accidents du travail, dans les deux cas comparés à l'absence d'intervention.

Les premières inspections, les inspections de suivi, les inspections liées à des plaintes et à des accidents ont entraîné des taux plus élevés de respect des dispositions légales comparativement à l'effet moyen de tout autre type d'inspections.

Dans les petites entreprises, les inspections avec des sanctions ou davantage de pénalités ont pu entraîner une baisse du nombre d'accidents du travail ou un plus grand respect des dispositions légales à court terme mais pas à moyen terme.

Les inspections plus longues et les inspections plus fréquentes n'aboutissent probablement pas à un plus grand respect des dispositions légales.

Dans deux études, il n'y avait aucun effet indésirable des inspections sur la survie, l'embauche ou les carnets de commande des entreprises.

Les études qualitatives montrent qu'il existe des éléments pour soutenir l'application des inspections parmi les travailleurs. Toutefois, les travailleurs doutent de l'efficacité des inspections parce qu'elles sont rares et que les violations peuvent être temporairement résolues pour induire les inspecteurs en erreur.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il existe des preuves que les inspections diminuent les accidents du travail à long terme mais probablement pas à court terme. L'amplitude de l'effet est incertaine. Aucune étude n'avait utilisé les expositions chimiques ou physiques comme résultats. Les inspections ciblées spécifiques ont pu entraîner des effets plus puissants que les inspections d'ordre général. L'effet des amendes et des pénalités est incertain. La qualité des preuves est faible à très faible, par conséquent ces conclusions ne sont qu'une tentative et peuvent être facilement modifiées par de futures études mieux adaptées. Il existe un besoin urgent de réaliser des évaluations fondées sur une meilleure conception, comme par exemple des essais randomisés pragmatiques, afin d'établir les effets des méthodes de mise en application des dispositions légales existantes et nouvelles, notamment sur l'exposition au risque et les problèmes.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Outils de mise en application de la réglementation relative à la santé et à la sécurité au travail pour la prévention des maladies professionnelles et des accidents du travail

Inspections pour prévenir les maladies professionnelles et les accidents du travail

Dans la plupart des pays, les inspecteurs gouvernementaux procèdent à des contrôles pour vérifier que le lieu de travail est en conformité avec la réglementation, par exemple WorkSafeBC en Colombie britannique au Canada, l'agence fédérale Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA, Administration chargée de la santé et de la sécurité sur les lieux de travail) aux États-Unis ou l'inspection du travail dans d'autres pays. Les inspections coûtent cher et ne parviennent pas à contrôler tous les lieux de travail. On ignore le niveau d'efficacité de ces inspections pour réduire les maladies professionnelles et les accidents du travail.

Pour examiner les preuves sur l'effet des inspections, nous avons effectué une recherche d'études jusqu'à janvier 2013.

Nous avons trouvé 23 études. Deux études étaient des essais contrôlés randomisés portant sur 1 414 lieux de travail. Quinze études non randomisées ont analysé les taux d'accidents du travail dans les entreprises obtenus dans les grandes bases de données administratives. Six études impliquant plus de 340 participants au total ont rendu compte des opinions des travailleurs ou des employés.

Deux études ont randomisé les inspections ou l'absence d'inspection sur les lieux de travail. Au bout d'un an de suivi, le taux d'accidents du travail non mortels dans une étude et la fréquence du surmenage physique dans l'autre étude étaient toujours comparables dans les deux groupes d'étude. Cinq autres études comparables mais d'une qualité inférieure ont abouti à des résultats contradictoires pour le suivi à court terme et à moyen terme. Deux autres études non randomisées ont découvert que, après plus de trois ans, les inspections ont entraîné une baisse des accidents et des blessures du travail de 23 % comparées à l'absence d'inspection et il n'y avait aucun effet sur la productivité des entreprises.

Les inspections spécifiques ont entraîné une élévation des taux de respect des dispositions légales. Les inspections avec des pénalités pourraient entraîner une baisse du nombre des accidents et un plus grand respect des dispositions légales à court terme dans les petites entreprises. Les inspections plus longues et les inspections plus fréquentes n'aboutissent probablement pas à un plus grand respect des dispositions légales.

Deux études n'ont pas détecté d'effet négatif des inspections sur la durée de vie ou l'emploi des entreprises.

Les études qualitatives ont démontré qu'il existe des éléments pour soutenir l'application des inspections parmi les travailleurs. Toutefois, les travailleurs doutent de l'efficacité des inspections parce qu'elles sont rares et que les violations peuvent être temporairement résolues pour induire les inspecteurs en erreur.

Nous avons conclu que les inspections diminuent les accidents du travail à long terme mais probablement pas à court terme. Les preuves sont de qualité faible à très faible parce que les résultats de l'ensemble des études sont contradictoires et que les études sont observationnelles et ne tiennent pas compte des autres facteurs susceptibles de modifier les résultats. En outre, l'amplitude de l'effet est incertaine car il varie de 3 à 23 pour cent de baisse des taux d'accidents du travail. La qualité des preuves étant faible, les futures études pourront facilement modifier nos conclusions. Il existe un besoin urgent d’essais randomisés à grande échelle pour évaluer les différents types de méthode d'inspection sur l'exposition des travailleurs au risque, les problèmes et les accidents du travail.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 16th October, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.