Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Pre-operative endometrial thinning agents before endometrial destruction for heavy menstrual bleeding

  1. Yu Hwee Tan1,*,
  2. Anne Lethaby2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group

Published Online: 15 NOV 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 11 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010241.pub2


How to Cite

Tan YH, Lethaby A. Pre-operative endometrial thinning agents before endometrial destruction for heavy menstrual bleeding. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD010241. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010241.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    ADHB, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Auckland, New Zealand

  2. 2

    University of Auckland, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Auckland, New Zealand

*Yu Hwee Tan, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ADHB, Auckland, New Zealand. hwee_85@yahoo.co.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 15 NOV 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Heavy menstrual bleeding is one of the most common reasons for referral of premenopausal women to a gynaecologist. Although medical therapy is generally first line, many women eventually will require further treatment. Endometrial ablation by hysteroscopic and more recent "second-generation" devices such as balloon, radiofrequency or microwave ablation offers a day-case surgical alternative to hysterectomy. Complete endometrial destruction is one of the main determinants of treatment success. Surgery is most effective if undertaken when endometrial thickness is less than four millimeters. One option is to perform the surgery in the immediate postmenstrual phase, which is not always practical. The other option is to use hormonal agents that induce endometrial thinning pre-operatively. The most commonly evaluated agents are goserelin (a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogue, or GnRHa) and danazol. Other GnRH analogues and progestogens have also been studied, although fewer data are available. It has been suggested that these agents will reduce operating time, improve the intrauterine operating environment and reduce absorption of fluid used for intraoperative uterine cavity distension. They may also improve long-term outcomes, including menstrual loss and dysmenorrhoea.

Objectives

To investigate the effectiveness and safety of pre-operative endometrial thinning agents (GnRH agonists, danazol, estrogen-progestins and progestogens) versus another agent or placebo when given before endometrial destruction in premenopausal women with heavy menstrual bleeding.

Search methods

The following electronic databases were searched to April 2013 for published and unpublished randomised controlled trials that met the inclusion criteria: the Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group (MDSG) Specialised Register of controlled trials, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO.

Other electronic sources of trials included trial registers for ongoing and registered trials; citation indexes; conference abstracts in the Web of Knowledge; the LILACS database for trials from the Portuguese- and Spanish-speaking world; PubMed; and the OpenSIGLE database and Google for grey literature.

All searches were performed in consultation with the MDSG Trials Search Co-ordinator.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they compared the effects of these agents with one other, or with placebo or no treatment, on relevant intraoperative and postoperative treatment outcomes. Selection of trials was carried out independently by two review authors.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed studies for risk of bias and extracted data on surgical outcomes, effectiveness outcomes, proportion of women requiring further surgical therapy during follow-up, endometrial outcome measures, acceptability of use outcomes and quality of life. Data were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Dichotomous data were combined for meta-analysis with RevMan software using the Mantel-Haenszel method to estimate pooled risk ratios (RRs). Continuous data were combined for meta-analysis with RevMan software using an inverse variance method to estimate the pooled mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). The overall quality of evidence for the main findings was assessed with the use of GRADE working group methods.

Main results

Twenty studies with 1969 women were included in this review. These studies compared GnRHa, danazol and progestogens versus placebo or no treatment; GnRHa versus danazol, progestogens, GnRH antagonists or dilatation & curettage; and danazol versus progestogens. Four studies performed more than one comparison.

When compared with no treatment, GnRHa used before hysteroscopic resection were associated with a higher rate of postoperative amenorrhoea at 12 months (RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.0, 7 RCTs, 605 women, moderate heterogeneity; I2 = 40%) and at 24 months (RR 1.62, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.52, 2 RCTs, 357 women, no heterogeneity; I2 = 0%), a slightly shorter duration of surgery (-3.5 minutes, 95% CI -4.7 to -2.3, 5 RCTs, 156 women, substantial heterogeneity; I2 = 72%) and greater ease of surgery (RR 0.32, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.46, 2 RCTs, 415 women, low heterogeneity; I2 = 4%). Postoperative dysmenorrhoea was reduced (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.87, 2 RCTs, 133 women, no heterogeneity; I2 = 0%). The use of GnRHa had no effect on intraoperative complication rates (RR 1.47, 95% CI 0.35 to 6.06, 5 RCTs, 592 women, no heterogeneity; I2 = 0%), and participant satisfaction with this surgery was high irrespective of the use of pre-operative endometrial thinning agents (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.05, 6 RCTs, 599 women, low heterogeneity; I2 = 11%). GnRHa produced more consistent endometrial atrophy than was produced by danazol (RR 1.84, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.75, 2 RCTs, 142 women, no heterogeneity; I2 = 0%). For other intraoperative and postoperative outcomes, any differences were minimal, and no benefits of GnRHa pretreatment were noted in studies in which women underwent second-generation ablation techniques. Both GnRHa and danazol produced side effects in a significant proportion of women, although few studies reported these in detail. Few randomised data were available to allow assessment of the effectiveness of progestogens as endometrial thinning agents. When reported, the long-term effects of endometrial thinning agents on benefits such as postoperative amenorrhoea were reduced with time.

The main study weaknesses were that most participants received no follow-up beyond 24 months and that the studies used a small sample size. Heterogeneity for outcomes reported ranged from none to substantial. More than half the trials had no blinding of participants or outcome assessment. Most of the trials were determined to have uncertain selection and reporting bias, as they did not report allocation concealment and evidence of selective reporting was noted. The quality of reporting of adverse events was generally poor, but, when described in the studies, they included menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, vaginal dryness, hirsutism, decreased libido and voice changes, as well as other side effects such as headache and weight gain.

Authors' conclusions

Low-quality evidence suggests that endometrial thinning with GnRHa and danazol before hysteroscopic surgery improves operating conditions and short-term postoperative outcomes. GnRHa produced slightly more consistent endometrial thinning than was produced by danazol, although both achieved satisfactory results. The effect of these agents on longer-term postoperative outcomes was reduced with time. No benefits of GnRHa pretreatment were apparent with second-generation ablation techniques. Also, side effects were more common when these agents were used.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Pre-operative endometrial thinning agents before endometrial destruction for heavy menstrual bleeding

Review Question

Cochrane authors reviewed evidence for the effectiveness and safety of medications used to thin the lining of the womb before surgery performed to destroy (ablate) this lining (endometrium) in premenopausal women with heavy menstrual bleeding.

Background

Heavy menstrual bleeding is one of the most common reasons why premenopausal women are referred to a gynaecologist; this condition can cause significant physical, emotional and social stress in a woman's life. Surgery to ablate the endometrium is a treatment option available for this condition that is less invasive than removal of the womb (i.e. hysterectomy). We wanted to discover whether using medications to thin the lining of the womb before endometrial destruction enhanced the effectiveness of surgery in reducing symptoms and improved operating conditions for the surgeon. We also wanted to evaluate the safety of these medications (i.e. observe whether side effects or surgical complications were increased). These medications included gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRH analogues), danazol and progestogens. Endometrial destruction surgery included either the older 'hysteroscopic' technique, whereby the lining of the womb is destroyed under direct vision, or the newer second-generation techniques, which include balloon, radiofrequency and microwave ablation.

Study Characteristics

The evidence is current to April 2013. The review included 20 randomised controlled trials with a total of 1969 premenopausal women with heavy menstrual bleeding for whom non-surgical treatment had not worked. Studies compared GnRH analogues, danazol and progestogens versus placebo or no treatment; GnRH analogues versus danazol, progestogens, GnRH antagonists or dilatation & curettage; and danazol versus progestogens. Four studies performed more than one comparison. Three studies used the newer second-generation surgical techniques for endometrial destruction.

Key Results

GnRH analogues and danazol used before hysteroscopic surgery improve both operating conditions for the surgeon and short-term bleeding symptoms for women (up to 24 months after surgery). GnRH analogues thin the lining of the womb better and more consistently than danazol, although both agents produce satisfactory results. Adverse effects were more common in women taking GnRH analogues or danazol compared with no treatment, and this was especially true with danazol. Adverse effects included menopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, vaginal dryness, hirsutism, decreased libido and voice changes, as well as other side effects such as headache and weight gain. The use of medications to thin the lining of the womb before surgery does not appear to improve heavy menstrual bleeding in the long term (i.e. longer than 24 months). However, only a few small studies followed up with women for longer than 24 months. Also, medications given to thin the womb lining do not provide additional benefit when used with the newer second-generation endometrial destruction techniques, which are being performed increasingly in hospitals.

Quality of Evidence

Overall, the quality of the evidence was very low because of risk of bias in the included studies and differences between the studies. The quality of reporting of adverse events was generally poor.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Agents anticoagulants de l'endomètre préopératoire avant la destruction de l'endomètre pour saignements menstruels abondants

Contexte

Selon les gynécologues, les saignements menstruels abondants sont l'un des motifs les plus courants chez les femmes pré-ménopausées. Bien qu’un traitement médical soit généralement de première ligne, de nombreuses femmes exigeront éventuellement un traitement supplémentaire. L'ablation de l'endomètre par hystéroscopie et les appareils plus récents de deuxième génération, tels que l'ablation par micro-ondes, par ballonnet ou par radiofréquence, offrent une alternative chirurgicale de jour comparée à l'hystérectomie. La destruction complète de l'endomètre est l'un des principaux facteurs déterminants le succès du traitement. La chirurgie est plus efficace lorsque l'épaisseur de l'endomètre est inférieure à quatre millimètres. Une option consiste à réaliser la chirurgie dans la phase post-menstruelle immédiate, ce qui n'est pas toujours pratique. L'autre option consiste à utiliser des agents hormonaux qui amincissent l'endomètre avant l'opération. Les agents les plus couramment évalués sont la goséréline (un analogue de l'hormone de libération des gonadotrophines, ou GnRHa) et le danazol. D'autres analogues de la GnRH et des progestatifs ont également été étudiés, bien que moins de données soient disponibles. Il a été suggéré que ces agents permettent de réduire la durée de l'opération, d’améliorer l’environnement de l'opération intra-utérine et de réduire l'absorption de liquide utilisé pour la distension de la cavité utérine peropératoire. Ils peuvent également améliorer les résultats à long terme, y compris les pertes menstruelles et la dysménorrhée.

Objectifs

Étudier l'efficacité et l'innocuité préopératoire des agents anticoagulants de l'endomètre (agonistes de la GnRH, danazol, œstrogènes - progestérone et progestatifs) par rapport à un autre agent ou à un placebo lorsqu' ils sont administrés avant la destruction de l'endomètre chez les femmes pré-ménopausées présentant des saignements menstruels abondants.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Les bases de données électroniques suivantes ont fait l'objet de recherches jusqu'en avril 2013 pour identifier des essais contrôlés randomisés publiés et non publiés qui remplissaient les critères d'inclusion : le registre spécialisé des essais contrôlés du groupe sur les troubles menstruels et la fertilité, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL et PsycINFO.

D'autres sources électroniques d'essais incluaient les registres des essais en cours et les essais enregistrés; les indices de citation; les actes de conférences dans le Web of Knowledge; la base de données LILACS pour les essais en Portugais et en Espagnol; PubMed; et la base de données OpenSIGLE et Google pour la littérature grise.

Toutes les recherches ont été effectuées en consultation avec le coordinateur du groupe sur les troubles menstruels et la fertilité.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) ont été inclus s'ils comparaient les effets de ces agents à un autre, ou à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement, concernant les critères de jugement du traitement peropératoire et postopératoire pertinents. La sélection des essais a été réalisée indépendamment par deux auteurs de la revue.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué le risque de biais des études et extrait les données des résultats chirurgicaux, l'efficacité des critères de jugement, la proportion de femmes nécessitant un traitement chirurgical au cours du suivi, d'autres mesures de résultats de l'endomètre, les critères de jugement concernant l’acceptabilité de l'utilisation et la qualité de vie. Les données ont été analysées en intention de traiter. Les données dichotomiques ont été combinées en une méta-analyse à l'aide du logiciel RevMan utilisant la méthode de Mantel-Haenszel pour estimer les rapports de risque (RR) combinés. Les données en continu ont été combinées en une méta-analyse à l'aide du logiciel RevMan utilisant une méthode de variance inverse afin d'estimer la différence moyenne (DM) avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95%. La qualité globale des preuves pour les principaux résultats a été évaluée avec les méthodes du groupe de travail GRADE.

Résultats Principaux

Vingt études totalisant 1 969 femmes ont été inclues dans cette revue. Ces études comparaient les GnRHa, le danazol et les progestatifs par rapport à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement; les GnRHa versus le danazol, les progestatifs, les antagonistes de la GnRH ou la dilatation & le curetage; et le danazol versus les progestatifs. Quatre études ont réalisé plus d'une comparaison.

Par rapport à l'absence de traitement, les GnRHa utilisés avant la résection hystéroscopique étaient associées à un taux plus élevé d'aménorrhée postopératoire à 12 mois (RR de 1,6, IC à 95% de 1,2 à 2,0, 7 ECR, 605 femmes, hétérogénéité modérée; I 2 =40%) et à 24 mois (RR 1,62, IC à 95% de 1,04 à 2,52, 2 ECR, 357 femmes, absence d'hétérogénéité; I 2 =0%), durée de la chirurgie légèrement plus courte (-3,5 minutes, IC à 95% de -4,7 à -2,3, 5 ECR, 156 femmes, hétérogénéité substantielle; I 2 =72%) et chirurgie plus facile (RR 0,32, IC à 95% de 0,22 à 0,46, 2 ECR, 415 femmes, hétérogénéité faible; I 2 =4%). La dysménorrhée postopératoire a été réduite (RR 0,59, IC à 95% de 0,40 à 0,87, 2 ECR, 133 femmes, absence d'hétérogénéité; I 2 =0%). L'utilisation de GnRHa n'avait aucun effet sur les taux de complications peropératoires (RR de 1,47, IC à 95% de 0,35 à 6,06, 5 ECR; 592 femmes, absence d'hétérogénéité; I 2 =0%) et la satisfaction des participants envers cette intervention était élevée, indépendamment de l'utilisation des agents préopératoires anticoagulants de l'endomètre (RR 0,99, IC à 95% de 0,93 à 1,05, 6 ECR, 599 femmes, hétérogénéité faible; I 2 =11%). Les GnRHa produisaient une atrophie endométriale plus constante que le danazol (RR 1,84, IC à 95% de 1,23 à 2,75, 2 ECR, 142 femmes, absence d'hétérogénéité; I 2 =0%). Pour les autres résultats peropératoires et postopératoires, les différences étaient minimes et aucun bénéfice de prétraitement par GnRHa n’a été observé dans les études dans lesquelles les femmes avaient subi les techniques d'ablation de deuxième génération. Les GnRHa et le danazol produisaient des effets secondaires chez une proportion significative de femmes, bien que peu d'études aient fourni un compte rendu détaillé de ces effets. Peu de données randomisées était disponibles pour permettre une évaluation de l'efficacité des progestatifs comme agents anticoagulants de l'endomètre. Lorsque rapportés, les effets bénéfiques à long terme des agents anticoagulants de l'endomètre comme aménorrhée postopératoire ont été réduits avec le temps.

La principale faiblesse de l'étude était que la plupart des participants n’avaient reçu aucun suivi au-delà de 24 mois et que les études utilisaient une taille d'échantillon réduite. L'hétérogénéité pour les critères de jugement indiqués variait de aucune à importante. Plus de la moitié des essais ne présentaient ni de participant en aveugle, ni d'évaluation des résultats. La plupart des essais avaient une sélection et un rapport de biais incertains, car ils n'avaient pas rendu compte de l'assignation secrète et des preuves de notification sélective étaient observées. La qualité de notification d'effets indésirables était généralement médiocre. Toutefois, lorsqu' ils étaient décrits dans les études, ils incluaient les symptômes de la ménopause, tels que les bouffées de chaleur, la sécheresse vaginale, l'hirsutisme, une diminution de la libido, les modifications de la voix et d'autres effets secondaires, tels que des céphalées et une prise de poids.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves de faible qualité suggèrent que l'amincissement de l'endomètre par GnRHa et par danazol avant la chirurgie hystéroscopique offre de meilleures conditions opératoires et améliore les résultats postopératoires à court terme. Les GnRHa produisaient un amincissement de l'endomètre légèrement plus constant, comparés au danazol, bien que les deux résultats obtenus soient satisfaisants. L'effet de ces agents sur les résultats postopératoires à plus long terme a été réduit avec le temps. Aucun bénéfice de prétraitement par GnRHa n’a été observé avec les techniques d'ablation de deuxième génération. De même, les effets secondaires étaient plus fréquents lorsque ces agents étaient utilisés.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Agents anticoagulants de l'endomètre préopératoire avant la destruction de l'endomètre pour saignements menstruels abondants

Agents anticoagulants de l'endomètre préopératoire avant la destruction de l'endomètre pour saignements menstruels abondants

Question de la revue

Des auteurs de la revue Cochrane ont examiné les preuves concernant l'efficacité et l'innocuité de médicaments utilisés afin d’amincir la muqueuse utérine avant la chirurgie réalisée pour détruire (par ablation) cette muqueuse (endomètre) chez les femmes pré-ménopausées présentant des saignements menstruels abondants.

Contexte

Les saignements menstruels abondants sont l'un des motifs les plus courants pour lesquels les femmes pré-ménopausées sont orientées vers un gynécologue; cette pathologie peut entraîner un stress physique, émotionnel et social significatif dans la vie d'une femme. La chirurgie pour l’ablation de l'endomètre est une option de traitement disponible pour cette affection qui est moins invasive que l'ablation de l'utérus (hystérectomie). Nous avons voulu déterminer si l'utilisation de médicaments pour amincir la muqueuse utérine avant la destruction de l'endomètre améliorait l'efficacité de la chirurgie dans la réduction des symptômes et améliorait les conditions opératoires pour le chirurgien. Nous avons également voulu évaluer l'innocuité de ces médicaments (par exemple, savoir si les effets secondaires ou les complications chirurgicales augmentaient). Ces médicaments incluaient des analogues de libération de gonadotrophine (GnRH analogues), du danazol et des progestatifs. La chirurgie de destruction de l'endomètre incluait soit l’ancienne technique « hystéroscopique », dans laquelle la muqueuse utérine est détruite sous vision directe, soit la technique plus récente de deuxième génération qui comprend l'ablation par micro-ondes, par ballonnet et par radiofréquence.

Caractéristiques de l’étude

Les preuves sont à jour en avril 2013. La revue a inclus 20 essais contrôlés randomisés avec un total de 1 969 femmes pré-ménopausées présentant des saignements menstruels abondants, pour lesquelles un traitement non chirurgical n'avait pas fonctionné. Les études comparaient des analogues de la GnRH, du danazol et des progestatifs par rapport à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement; des analogues de la GnRH versus le danazol, des progestatifs, des antagonistes de la GnRH ou dilatation & curetage; et du danazol versus des progestatifs. Quatre études ont réalisé plus d'une comparaison. Trois études utilisaient les techniques de chirurgie plus récentes de deuxième génération pour la destruction de l'endomètre.

Résultats principaux

Les analogues de la GnRH et le danazol utilisés avant l’hystéroscopie améliorent les conditions opératoires pour le chirurgien et les symptômes de saignement chez les femmes à court terme (jusqu' à 24 mois après l'opération). Les analogues de la GnRH amincissent la muqueuse utérine plus efficacement et de façon plus constante que le danazol, bien que ces deux agents produisent des résultats satisfaisants. Les effets indésirables étaient plus fréquents chez les femmes prenant des analogues de la GnRH ou du danazol par rapport à l'absence de traitement et cela était particulièrement vrai pour le danazol. Les effets indésirables incluaient les symptômes de la ménopause, tels que les bouffées de chaleur, la sécheresse vaginale, l'hirsutisme, une diminution de la libido et des modifications de la voix, ainsi que d'autres effets secondaires, tels que des céphalées et une prise de poids. L'utilisation de médicaments pour amincir la muqueuse utérine avant la chirurgie ne semblait pas améliorer les saignements menstruels abondants sur le long terme (plus de 24 mois). Cependant, seules quelques petites études ont suivi les femmes pendant plus de 24 mois. En outre, des médicaments administrés pour amincir la muqueuse utérine ne fournissaient pas de bénéfice supplémentaire lorsqu' ils étaient utilisés par les nouvelles techniques de deuxième génération pour l’ablation de l'endomètre, qui sont de plus en plus réalisées dans les hôpitaux.

La qualité de l’évidence

Dans l'ensemble, la qualité des preuves était très faible en raison du risque de biais dans les études incluses et des différences entre les études. La qualité de notification d'effets indésirables était généralement médiocre.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st November, 2013
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé