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Intervention Protocol

Telerehabilitation services for stroke

  1. Kate E Laver1,*,
  2. Daniel Schoene2,
  3. Maria Crotty3,
  4. Stacey George4,
  5. Natasha A Lannin5,
  6. Catherine Sherrington6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Stroke Group

Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 12 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010255

How to Cite

Laver KE, Schoene D, Crotty M, George S, Lannin NA, Sherrington C. Telerehabilitation services for stroke (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD010255. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010255.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Flinders University, Department of Rehabilitation and Aged Care, Adelaide, Australia

  2. 2

    Neuroscience Research Australia, Falls and Balance Research Group, Sydney, Australia

  3. 3

    Flinders University, Repat Hospital, Department of Rehabilitation and Aged Care, Daw Park, South Australia, Australia

  4. 4

    Flinders University, Department of Rehabilitation and Aged Care, Daw Park, South Australia, Australia

  5. 5

    Alfred Clinical School, La Trobe University, Faculty of Health Science, Prahran, Victoria, Australia

  6. 6

    The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, Musculoskeletal Division, Sydney, NSW, Australia

*Kate E Laver, Department of Rehabilitation and Aged Care, Flinders University, Repatriation General Hospitals, Daws Road, Daw Park, Adelaide, 5041, Australia. kate.laver@health.sa.gov.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

The primary objective of this review is to determine:

  1. whether the use of telerehabilitation leads to improved ability to perform activities of daily living among stroke survivors when compared with in-person rehabilitation. In-person rehabilitation occurs when the clinician and patient are at the same physical location and rehabilitation is provided face-to-face either in an inpatient, clinic or home setting;
  2. whether the use of telerehabilitation leads to improved ability to perform activities of daily living among stroke survivors when compared with no rehabilitation.

The secondary objective is to determine whether use of telerehabilitation leads to greater independence in self-care and domestic life, mobility, health-related quality of life, upper limb function, cognitive function or functional communication when compared with in-person rehabilitation and no rehabilitation. Additionally, we aim to report on the presence of adverse events, cost-effectiveness, feasibility and levels of user satisfaction with the intervention.