Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) related complications in surgical patients

  1. Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy1,*,
  2. Rahul Koti1,
  3. Peter Wilson2,
  4. Brian R Davidson1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Wounds Group

Published Online: 19 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 1 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010268.pub2


How to Cite

Gurusamy KS, Koti R, Wilson P, Davidson BR. Antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) related complications in surgical patients. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD010268. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010268.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Department of Surgery, London, UK

  2. 2

    University College London Hospitals, Department of Microbiology & Virology, London, UK

*Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy, Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Royal Free Hospital,, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 2PF, UK. kurinchi2k@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 19 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection after surgery is generally low, but affects up to 33% of patients after certain types of surgery. Postoperative MRSA infection can occur as surgical site infections (SSIs), chest infections, or bloodstream infections (bacteraemia). The incidence of MRSA SSIs varies from 1% to 33% depending upon the type of surgery performed and the carrier status of the individuals concerned. The optimal prophylactic antibiotic regimen for the prevention of MRSA after surgery is not known.

Objectives

To compare the benefits and harms of all methods of antibiotic prophylaxis in the prevention of postoperative MRSA infection and related complications in people undergoing surgery.

Search methods

In March 2013 we searched the following databases: The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (The Cochrane Library); NHS Economic Evaluation Database (The Cochrane Library); Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL.

Selection criteria

We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared one antibiotic regimen used as prophylaxis for SSIs (and other postoperative infections) with another antibiotic regimen or with no antibiotic, and that reported the methicillin resistance status of the cultured organisms. We did not limit our search for RCTs by language, publication status, publication year, or sample size.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently identified the trials for inclusion in the review, and extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for comparing binary outcomes between the groups and planned to calculated the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI for comparing continuous outcomes. We planned to perform meta-analysis using both a fixed-effect model and a random-effects model. We performed intention-to-treat analysis whenever possible.

Main results

We included 12 RCTs, with 4704 participants, in this review. Eleven trials performed a total of 16 head-to-head comparisons of different prophylactic antibiotic regimens. Antibiotic prophylaxis was compared with no antibiotic prophylaxis in one trial. All the trials were at high risk of bias. With the exception of one trial in which all the participants were positive for nasal carriage of MRSA or had had previous MRSA infections, it does not appear that MRSA was tested or eradicated prior to surgery; nor does it appear that there was high prevalence of MRSA carrier status in the people undergoing surgery.

There was no sufficient clinical similarity between the trials to perform a meta-analysis. The overall all-cause mortality in four trials that reported mortality was 14/1401 (1.0%) and there were no significant differences in mortality between the intervention and control groups in each of the individual comparisons. There were no antibiotic-related serious adverse events in any of the 561 people randomised to the seven different antibiotic regimens in four trials (three trials that reported mortality and one other trial). None of the trials reported quality of life, total length of hospital stay or the use of healthcare resources. Overall, 221/4032 (5.5%) people developed SSIs due to all organisms, and 46/4704 (1.0%) people developed SSIs due to MRSA.

In the 15 comparisons that compared one antibiotic regimen with another, there were no significant differences in the proportion of people who developed SSIs. In the single trial that compared an antibiotic regimen with placebo, the proportion of people who developed SSIs was significantly lower in the group that received antibiotic prophylaxis with co-amoxiclav (or cefotaxime if allergic to penicillin) compared with placebo (all SSI: RR 0.26; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.65; MRSA SSI RR 0.05; 95% CI 0.00 to 0.83). In two trials that reported MRSA infections other than SSI, 19/478 (4.5%) people developed MRSA infections including SSI, chest infection and bacteraemia. There were no significant differences in the proportion of people who developed MRSA infections at any body site in these two comparisons.

Authors' conclusions

Prophylaxis with co-amoxiclav decreases the proportion of people developing MRSA infections compared with placebo in people without malignant disease undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion, although this may be due to decreasing overall infection thereby preventing wounds from becoming secondarily infected with MRSA. There is currently no other evidence to suggest that using a combination of multiple prophylactic antibiotics or administering prophylactic antibiotics for an increased duration is of benefit to people undergoing surgery in terms of reducing MRSA infections. Well designed RCTs assessing the clinical effectiveness of different antibiotic regimens are necessary on this topic.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Using an antibiotic to prevent MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infections and related complications in people having surgery

Most bacterial wound infections after surgery heal naturally or after treatment with antibiotics.  Some bacteria are resistant to commonly-used antibiotics, e.g. methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA infection after surgery is rare, but can occur in wounds (surgical site infections, or SSI), the chest, or bloodstream (bacteraemia), and can be life-threatening. MRSA SSIs occur in 1% to 33% of people having surgery (depending on the type of operation) and result in extended hospitalisation.

Antibiotics can be used individually, or combined, and administered for different durations. To identify the best antibiotic(s), or dose pattern, for preventing development of MRSA infection after surgery, we investigated studies that compared different antibiotics with each other, or with no treatment, to prevent MRSA SSIs. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs), and set no limits regarding language, or date, of publication, or trial size. Two review authors identified studies and extracted data independently.

We identified 12 RCTs, with 4704 participants. Eleven trials compared 16 preventative (prophylactic) antibiotic treatments, and one compared antibiotic prophylaxis with no prophylaxis. Generally, MRSA status of the participants prior to surgery was not known.

Four studies reported deaths (14/1401 participants): approximately 1% of participants died from any cause after surgery, but there were no significant differences between treatment groups. Four trials reported on serious antibiotic-related adverse events - there were none in 561 participants. None of the trials reported quality of life, length of hospital stay or use of healthcare resources. Overall, 221 SSIs due to any bacterium developed in 4032 people (6%), and 46 MRSA SSIs developed in 4704 people (1%). There were no significant differences in development of SSIs between the 15 comparisons of one antibiotic treatment against another. When antibiotic prophylaxis with co-amoxiclav was compared with no antibiotic prophylaxis, a significantly lower proportion of people developed SSIs after receiving co-amoxiclav (74% reduction in all SSIs, and 95% reduction in MRSA SSIs).

Two trials reported that 19 participants developed MRSA infection in wounds (SSIs), chest, or bloodstream, but there were no significant differences in the proportion of people who developed them between the two comparisons.

Prophylaxis with co-amoxiclav decreases the proportion of people developing MRSA infections compared with no antibiotic prophylaxis in people without cancer undergoing surgery for feeding tube insertion into the stomach using endoscopy, although this may be due to decreasing overall infection thereby preventing wounds from becoming secondarily infected with MRSA. There is currently no other evidence that either a combination of prophylactic antibiotics, or increased duration of antibiotic treatment, benefits people undergoing surgery in terms of reducing MRSA infections. Well-designed RCTs are necessary to assess different antibiotic treatments for preventing MRSA infections after surgery.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Prophylaxie antibiotique pour la prévention des complications liées au Staphylococcus aureus résistant à la méthicilline (SARM) chez les patients chirurgicaux

Contexte

Le risque d'infection à Staphylococcus aureus résistant à la méthicilline (SARM) après une intervention chirurgicale.est généralement faible, mais touche jusqu'à 33 % des patients après la réalisation de certains types de chirurgie. L'infection à SARM post-opératoire peut se manifester par des infections du site opératoire, des infections thoraciques ou des infections sanguines (bactériémie). L'incidence des infections à SARM du site opératoire varie de 1 % à 33 % en fonction du type d'intervention chirurgicale pratiquée et du statut de porteur des individus concernés. Le schéma thérapeutique antibiotique prophylactique optimal pour la prévention du SARM après une intervention chirurgicale n'a pas encore été établi.

Objectifs

Comparer les bénéfices et les risques de toutes les méthodes de prophylaxie antibiotique dans la prévention de l'infection à SARM post-opératoire et des complications associées chez les personnes ayant subi une intervention chirurgicale.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En mars 2013, nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques suivantes : le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les plaies et contusions ; le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) ; la base des résumés des revues systématiques hors Cochrane (DARE) (The Cochrane Library) ; la base de données d'évaluation de l'économie de la santé (NHS-Economic Evaluation Database) (The Cochrane Library) ; la base de données d'évaluation des technologies de la santé (Health Technology Assessment (HTA)) (The Cochrane Library) ; Ovid MEDLINE ; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations) ; Ovid EMBASE ; et EBSCO CINAHL.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus uniquement les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) ayant comparé un schéma thérapeutique antibiotique utilisé pour la prophylaxie contre les infections du site opératoire (et d'autres infections post-opératoires) à un autre schéma thérapeutique antibiotique ou à l'absence d'antibiotique, et ayant indiqué le statut de résistant à la méthicilline des organismes mis en culture. Nous n'avons pas limité la recherche d'ECR par langue, statut de publication, année de publication ou effectif.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont sélectionné les essais à inclure dans la revue et extrait les données de façon indépendante. Nous avons calculé le risque relatif (RR) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % pour comparer les résultats binaires entre les groupes, et avions prévu de calculer la différence moyenne (DM) avec un IC à 95 % pour comparer les résultats continus. Nous avions prévu d'effectuer la méta-analyse en utilisant à la fois un modèle à effets aléatoires et un modèle à effets fixes. Nous avons extrait les résultats par une analyse en intention de traiter quand cela était possible.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 12 essais totalisant 4 704 participants dans cette revue. Onze essais ont organisé un total de 16 comparaisons directes de différents schémas thérapeutiques antibiotiques prophylactiques. La prophylaxie antibiotique a été comparée à l'absence de prophylaxie antibiotique dans un essai. Tous les essais étaient à risque élevé de biais. À l'exception d'un essai dans lequel tous les participants étaient positifs pour la transmission par voie nasale de SARM ou avaient précédemment eu des infections à SARM, il ne semble pas que le SARM ait été testé ou éradiqué préalablement à la chirurgie ; il ne semble pas non plus qu'il y ait eu une forte prévalence du statut de porteur de SARM chez les personnes ayant subi une intervention chirurgicale.

Il n'existait pas suffisamment de similarité clinique entre les essais pour réaliser une méta-analyse. La mortalité globale toutes causes confondues dans quatre essais ayant rendu compte de la mortalité était de 14/1 401 (1,0 %) et il n'existait pas de différence significative en termes de mortalité entre les groupes avec intervention et témoin dans chacune des comparaisons individuelles. Il n'y a pas eu d'événement indésirable grave lié aux antibiotiques chez aucune des 561 personnes randomisées dans les sept différents schémas thérapeutiques antibiotiques dans quatre essais (trois essais ayant rendu compte de la mortalité et un autre essai). Aucun des essais n'a rendu compte de la qualité de vie, de la longueur totale du séjour hospitalier ou de l'utilisation des ressources de santé. Globalement, 221/4 032 personnes (5,5 %) ont développé des infections du site opératoire dues à tous les organismes, et 46/4 704 personnes (1,0 %) ont développé des infections du site opératoire dues à SARM.

Dans les 15 comparaisons opposant un schéma thérapeutique antibiotique par rapport à un autre, il n'y avait aucune différence significative dans la proportion de personnes qui ont développé des infections du site opératoire. Dans l'unique essai qui a comparé un schéma thérapeutique antibiotique à un placebo, la proportion de personnes qui ont développé des infections du site opératoire était significativement plus faible dans le groupe recevant une prophylaxie antibiotique à base de co-amoxiclav (ou de céfotaxime en cas d'allergie à la pénicilline) par rapport à un placebo (toutes les infections du site opératoire : RR 0,26 ; IC à 95 % 0,11 à 0,65 ; infections à SARM du site opératoire RR 0,05 ; IC à 95 % 0,00 à 0,83). Dans deux essais ayant rapporté des infections à SARM autres que les infections du site opératoire, 19/478 personnes (4,5 %) ont développé des infections à SARM incluant les infections du site opératoire, les infections thoraciques et les bactériémies. Il n'y avait aucune différence significative dans la proportion de personnes qui ont développé des infections à SARM dans n'importe quelle partie du corps dans ces deux comparaisons.

Conclusions des auteurs

La prophylaxie à base de co-amoxiclav réduit la proportion de personnes qui ont développé des infections à SARM comparée à un placebo chez les personnes ne présentant pas de pathologie maligne faisant l'objet d'une gastrostomie (pose d'une sonde d'alimentation gastrique) par voie endoscopique percutanée, bien que cela puisse être dû à la réduction globale de l'infection empêchant ainsi les infections secondaires des plaies dues à SARM. À l'heure actuelle, il n'existe pas d'autres preuves suggérant que l'utilisation d'une association de différents antibiotiques prophylactiques, ou que l'administration d'antibiotiques prophylactiques pendant une durée plus longue soit bénéfique pour les personnes ayant subi une intervention chirurgicale en termes de réduction des infections à SARM. Des ECR bien conçus évaluant l'efficacité clinique de différents schémas thérapeutiques antibiotiques sont nécessaires dans ce domaine.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Prophylaxie antibiotique pour la prévention des complications liées au Staphylococcus aureus résistant à la méthicilline (SARM) chez les patients chirurgicaux

Utilisation d'un antibiotique pour prévenir les infections à SARM (Staphylococcus aureus résistant à la méthicilline) et les complications associées chez les personnes ayant subi une intervention chirurgicale

La plupart des infections bactériennes de plaies suite à une intervention chirurgicale guérissent naturellement ou après traitement par des antibiotiques.  Certaines bactéries présentent une résistance à des antibiotiques couramment utilisés, par exemple Staphylococcus aureus résistant à la méthicilline (SARM). L'infection à SARM après la chirurgie est rare, mais peut survenir dans des plaies (infections du site opératoire, ou SSI), le thorax, ou la circulation sanguine (bactériémie), et peut engager le pronostic vital. Les infections à SARM du site opératoire surviennent chez 1 % à 33 % des personnes ayant subi une intervention chirurgicale (en fonction du type d'opération) et aboutissent à des hospitalisations prolongées.

Les antibiotiques peuvent être utilisés individuellement, ou en association, et être administrés pendant des durées différentes. Pour identifier le(s) meilleur(s) antibiotique(s), ou le meilleur schéma posologique, dans le cadre de la prévention du développement d'une infection à SARM après une intervention chirurgicale, nous avons examiné les études ayant comparé différents antibiotiques les uns par rapport aux autres, ou à l'absence de traitement, pour prévenir les infections à SARM du site opératoire. Nous avons inclus uniquement les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), et n'avons imposé aucune limite concernant la langue, ou la date, de publication, ou la taille de l'échantillon de l'essai. Deux auteurs ont indépendamment identifié les études et extrait les données.

Nous avons identifié 12 ECR portant sur 4 704 participants. Onze essais ont comparé 16 traitements antibiotiques préventifs (prophylactiques), et un essai a comparé la prophylaxie antibiotique à l'absence de prophylaxie. En règle générale, le statut de porteur de SARM des participants préalablement à la chirurgie n'était pas connu.

Quatre études ont signalé des décès (14/1 401 participants) : environ 1 % des participants sont décédés d'une cause consécutive à la chirurgie, mais il n'y avait aucune différence significative entre les groupes de traitement. Quatre essais ont rapporté des événements indésirables graves liés aux antibiotiques ; il n'y en a eu aucun parmi 561 participants. Aucun des essais n'a rendu compte de la qualité de vie, de la longueur du séjour hospitalier ou de l'utilisation des ressources de santé. Globalement, 221 infections du site opératoire dues à une bactérie quelconque se sont développées chez 4 032 personnes (6 %), et 46 infections à SARM du site opératoire se sont développées chez 4 704 personnes (1 %). Il n'y avait aucune différence significative dans le développement des infections du site opératoire entre les 15 comparaisons d'un traitement antibiotique par rapport à un autre. Lorsque la prophylaxie antibiotique à base de co-amoxiclav a été comparée à l'absence de prophylaxie antibiotique, il est apparu qu'une proportion significativement plus faible de personnes avaient développé des infections du site opératoire après avoir reçu le co-amoxiclav (74 % de réduction de toutes les infections du site opératoire, et 95 % de réduction des infections à SARM du site opératoire).

Deux essais ont rapporté que 19 participants ont développé une infection à SARM du site opératoire dans les plaies, le thorax, ou la circulation sanguine, mais il n'y avait aucune différence significative au niveau de la proportion des personnes qui les ont développées entre les deux comparaisons.

La prophylaxie à base de co-amoxiclav réduit la proportion de personnes ayant développé des infections à SARM comparée à l'absence de prophylaxie antibiotique chez les personnes ne présentant pas de cancer ayant subi une intervention chirurgicale pour l'insertion d'une sonde d'alimentation dans l'estomac par voie endoscopique, bien que cela puisse être dû à la réduction globale de l'infection empêchant ainsi les infections secondaires des plaies dues à SARM. À l'heure actuelle, il n'existe pas d'autres preuves indiquant que l'une des associations d'antibiotiques prophylactiques, ou qu'une augmentation de la durée du traitement antibiotique, soit bénéfique pour les personnes ayant subi une intervention chirurgicale en termes de réduction des infections à SARM. Des ECR bien conçus sont nécessaires pour évaluer différents traitements antibiotiques pour la prévention des infections à SARM après une intervention chirurgicale.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 24th September, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.