Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Indwelling bladder catheterisation as part of intraoperative and postoperative care for caesarean section

  1. Hany Abdel-Aleem1,*,
  2. Mohamad Fathallah Aboelnasr2,
  3. Tameem M Jayousi3,
  4. Fawzia A Habib3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 11 APR 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 31 DEC 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010322.pub2


How to Cite

Abdel-Aleem H, Aboelnasr MF, Jayousi TM, Habib FA. Indwelling bladder catheterisation as part of intraoperative and postoperative care for caesarean section. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD010322. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010322.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Assiut University Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut, Assiut, Egypt

  2. 2

    Menoufiya University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Shebin El-kom City, Egypt

  3. 3

    Taibah University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Al-Madinah, Saudi Arabia

*Hany Abdel-Aleem, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University Hospital, Assiut, Assiut, 71511, Egypt. hany.abdelaleem@yahoo.com. haleem@aun.edu.eg.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 11 APR 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Caesarean section (CS) is the most common obstetric surgical procedure, with more than one-third of pregnant women having lower-segment CS. Bladder evacuation is carried out as a preoperative procedure prior to CS. Emerging evidence suggests that omitting the use of urinary catheters during and after CS could reduce the associated increased risk of urinary tract infections (UTIs), catheter-associated pain/discomfort to the woman, and could lead to earlier ambulation and a shorter stay in hospital.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness and safety of indwelling bladder catheterisation for intraoperative and postoperative care in women undergoing CS.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 December 2013) and reference lists of retrieved studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing indwelling bladder catheter versus no catheter or bladder drainage in women undergoing CS (planned or emergency), regardless of the type of anaesthesia used. Quasi-randomised trials, cluster-randomised trials were not eligible for inclusion. Studies presented as abstracts were eligible for inclusion providing there was sufficient information to assess the study design and outcomes.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed studies for eligibility and trial quality, and extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy.

Main results

The search retrieved 16 studies (from 17 reports). Ten studies were excluded and one study is awaiting assessment. We included five studies involving 1065 women (1090 recruited). The five included studies were at moderate risk of bias.

Data relating to one of our primary outcomes (UTI) was reported in four studies but did not meet our definition of UTI (as prespecified in our protocol). The included studies did not report on our other primary outcome – intraoperative bladder injury (this outcome was not prespecified in our protocol). Two secondary outcomes were not reported in the included studies: need for postoperative analgesia and women’s satisfaction. The included studies did provide limited data relating to this review’s secondary outcomes.

Indwelling bladder catheter versus no catheter - three studies (840 women)

Indwelling bladder catheterisation was associated with a reduced incidence of bladder distension (non-prespecified outcome) at the end of the operation (risk ratio (RR) 0.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.00 to 0.35; one study, 420 women) and fewer cases of retention of urine (RR 0.06, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.47; two studies, 420 women) or need for catheterisation (RR 0.03, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.16; three studies 840 participants). In contrast, indwelling bladder catheterisation was associated with a longer time to first voiding (mean difference (MD) 16.81 hours, 95% CI 16.32 to 17.30; one study, 420 women) and more pain or discomfort due to catheterisation (and/or at first voiding) (average RR 10.47, 95% CI 4.71 to 23.25, two studies, 420 women) although high levels of heterogeneity were observed. Similarly, compared to women in the ‘no catheter’ group, indwelling bladder catheterisation was associated with a longer time to ambulation (MD 4.34 hours, 95% CI 1.37 to 7.31, three studies, 840 women) and a longer stay in hospital (MD 0.62 days, 95% CI 0.15 to 1.10, three studies, 840 women). However, high levels of heterogeneity were observed for these two outcomes and the results should be interpreted with caution.

There was no difference in postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) due to uterine atony. There was also no difference in the incidence of UTI (as defined by trialists) between the indwelling bladder catheterisation and no catheterisation groups (two studies, 570 women). However, high levels of heterogeneity were observed for this non-prespecified outcome and results should be considered in this context.

Indwelling bladder catheter versus bladder drainage – two studies (225 women)

Two studies (225 women) compared the use of an indwelling bladder catheter versus bladder drainage. There was no difference between groups in terms of retention of urine following CS, length of hospital stay or the non-prespecified outcome of UTI (as defined by the trialist).

There is some evidence (from one small study involving 50 women), that the need for catheterisation was reduced in the group of women with an indwelling bladder catheter (RR 0.04, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.70) compared to women in the bladder drainage group. Evidence from another small study (involving 175 women) suggests that women who had an indwelling bladder catheter had a longer time to ambulation (MD 0.90, 95% CI 0.25 to 1.55) compared to women who received bladder drainage.

Authors' conclusions

This review includes limited evidence from five RCTs of moderate quality. The review's primary outcomes (bladder injury during operation and UTI), were either not reported or reported in a way not suitable for our analysis. The evidence in this review is based on some secondary outcomes, with heterogeneity present in some of the analyses. There is insufficient evidence to assess the routine use of indwelling bladder catheters in women undergoing CS. There is a need for more rigorous RCTs, with adequate sample sizes, standardised criteria for the diagnosis of UTI and other common outcomes.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

The effects of using of urinary catheter in women during and after a caesarean section

Caesaren section (CS) has become the most common obstetric surgery, with one in three of pregnant women having a caesarean delivery. The use of urinary catheters (flexible elastic tube used to drain urine from the bladder) during and after CS is routinely used with caesarean delivery. Alleged benefits of using catheters include; maintains bladder drainage that may improve visualisation during surgery and minimise bladder injury, and less retention of urine after operation (inability to pass urine), but it could be associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract infection, urethral pain, voiding difficulties after removal of the catheter, delayed ambulation, and increased hospital stay.

This review is based on five studies involving 1065 women undergoing CS. The studies were of moderate quality. The included studies did not use this review's criteria for diagnosis for UTI, so there are no data for this primary outcome. When considering UTI, as defined by the trial authors, there were no clear differences between groups. There were no data relating to bladder injury during the CS (the review's other primary outcome).

Our analysis showed that the use of urinary catheter was associated with less retention of urine after CS. On the other hand, pain/discomfort due to catheterisation or at first voiding after CS, time to ambulate and hospital stay favoured non-use of urinary catheter. There was no difference in the incidence of uterine bleeding due to uterine atony (relaxation of the uterus) after the delivery.

The limited evidence in this review is based five trials of moderate quality and results should be considered in this context. There is not enough evidence to assess the routine use of indwelling bladder catheters in women undergoing CS. There is a need for more rigorous research on this topic and future trials should use a standardised criteria for the diagnosis of UTI and other common outcomes.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Le cathéter à demeure pour la vessie dans le cadre des soins peropératoires et postopératoirespour la césarienne

Contexte

La césarienne est devenue la chirurgieobstétrique la plus courante, une femme enceinte sur trois ayant subi une césariennedu segment inférieur. L’évacuation de l’urine est une procédure préopératoire avant la césarienne. Des preuves récentes suggèrent que ne pas utiliser de cathéter urinaire pendant et après une césarienne pourrait réduire le risque d'infections des voies urinaires (IVU), la douleur / la gêne associées au cathéter et pourraient conduire à une ambulation plus précoce et une durée du séjour à l'hôpitalplus courte.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité du cathéter à demeure pour la vessie dans le cadre des soins peropératoires et postopératoires chez les femmes subissant une césarienne.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur la grossesse et la naissance (le 31 décembre 2013) et dans les références bibliographiques des études trouvées.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant lecathéter à demeure pour la vessie par rapport à l'absence de cathéter ou au drainage de la vessie chez les femmes subissant une césarienne (planifiée ou d'urgence), quel que soit le type d'anesthésie utilisée. Les essais quasi-randomisés et les essais randomisés en cluster n’étaient pas éligibles pour l'inclusion. Les études présentées sous forme de résumés étaient éligibles pour l’inclusion s’il y avait suffisamment d’informations pour évaluer le plan d'étude et les résultats.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué l'éligibilité des études et la qualité des essais et extrait les données. L’exactitude des données aétévérifiée.

Résultats Principaux

La recherche a trouvé 16 études (provenant de 17 rapports). Dix études ont été exclues et une étude est en attente d'évaluation. Nous avons inclus cinq études portant sur 1065 femmes (1090 recrutées). Cinq études incluses présentaient un risque de biais modéré.

Les données relatives à l'un de nos principaux critères de jugement (IVU) ont été rapportées dans quatre études, mais ne répondaient pas à notre définition des IVU (comme prédéfinies dans notre protocole). Les études incluses ne documentaient pas nos autres résultats primaires -lésion vésicale peropératoire (ce critère de jugement n’était pas pré-spécifié dans notre protocole). Deux critères de jugement secondaires n'étaient pas rapportés dans les études incluses : la nécessité d'analgésie postopératoire et la satisfaction des femmes. Les études incluses fournissaient des données limitées concernant les critères de jugement secondaires de cette revue.

Le cathéter à demeure pour la vessie par rapport à l'absence de cathéter - trois études (840 femmes)

Le cathéter à demeure pour la vessie était associé à une incidence réduite de distension de la vessie (résultat non-prédéfini) à la fin de l'opération (risque relatif (RR) de 0,02, intervalle de confiance à 95 % (IC) de 0,00 à 0,35; une étude, 420 femmes) et à moins de cas de rétention urinaire (RR de 0,06, IC à 95 % de 0,01 à 0,47; deux études, 420 femmes) ou de besoin de cathéter (RR de 0,03, IC à 95 % de 0,01 à 0,16 ; trois études, 840 participants). En revanche, lecathéter à demeure pour la vessie était associé à une première évacuation de l’urine de plus longue durée (différence moyenne (DM) de 16,81 heures, IC à 95 % de 16,32 à 17,30; une étude, 420 femmes) et plus de douleur ou de gêne due au cathéter (et / ou lorsde la première évacuation de l’urine) (RR moyen de 10,47, IC à 95 % de 4,71 à 23,25, deux études, 420 femmes), bien que des niveaux élevés d'hétérogénéité étaient observés. De même, comparé aux femmes dans le groupe sans cathéter, le cathéter à demeure pour la vessie était associé à une plus longue période d'ambulation (DM de 4,34 heures, IC à 95 % de 1,37 à 7,31, trois études, 840 femmes) et une plus longue durée du séjour à l'hôpital (DM de 0,62 jours, IC à 95 % de 0,15 à 1,10, trois études, 840 femmes). Cependant, des niveaux élevés d'hétérogénéité étaient observés pour ces deux critères de jugement et les résultats doivent être interprétés avec prudence.

Il n'y avait aucune différence dans l'hémorragie du post-partum (HPP) en raison d’atonie utérine. Il n'y avait également aucune différence dans l'incidence des IVU (telle que définie par les investigateurs) entre le groupe de cathéter à demeure pour la vessie et le groupe sans cathéter (deux études, 570 femmes). Cependant, des niveaux élevés d'hétérogénéité étaient observés pour ce critère de jugement non-prédéfini et les résultats devraient être pris en compte dans ce contexte.

Le cathéter à demeure pour la vessie par rapport au drainage de la vessie - deux études (225 femmes)

Deux études (225 femmes) comparaient l'utilisation du cathéter à demeure pour la vessie par rapport au drainage de la vessie. Il n'y avait aucune différence entre les groupes en termes de rétention d'urine suite à une césarienne, de durée de séjour à l'hôpital ou de critère de jugement non-prédéfinides IVU (tels que définis par les investigateurs).

Certaines preuves (issues d'une étude de petite taille portant sur 50 femmes)indiquent que le besoin de cathéterétait réduit dans le groupe de cathéter à demeure pour la vessie (RR de 0,04, IC à 95 % de 0,00 à 0,70) par rapport aux femmes dans le groupe de drainage de la vessie. Des preuves issues d'une autre étude de petite taille (impliquant 175 femmes) suggèrent que les femmes ayant reçu le cathéter à demeure pour la vessie avaient une plus longue période d'ambulation (DM de 0,90, IC à 95 % de 0,25 à 1,55) par rapport à celles ayant reçu le drainage de la vessie.

Conclusions des auteurs

Cette revue inclut des preuves limitées provenant de cinq ECR de qualité modérée. Les critères de jugement principaux de la revue (lésion vésicale pendant l'opération et IVU) n'étaient pas rapportés, ouétaientrapportés d’une manière inappropriée pour notre analyse. Les preuves dans cette revue sont basées sur certains critères de jugement secondaires, avec une hétérogénéité dans certaines analyses. Il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves pour évaluer l'utilisation systématique de cathéter à demeure pour la vessie chez les femmes subissant une césarienne. Des ECR plus rigoureux, avec des tailles d'échantillon adéquates, des critères standardisés pour le diagnostic des IVU et d'autres résultats comparables,sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Le cathéter à demeure pour la vessie dans le cadre des soins peropératoires et postopératoirespour la césarienne

Les effets de l'utilisation de cathéters urinaires chez les femmes pendant et après une césarienne

Lacésarienne est devenuela chirurgieobstétrique la plus courante, une femme enceinte sur trois ayant un accouchement par césarienne. L'utilisation de cathéters urinaires (tube en élastique souple pour le drainage de la vessie) pendant et après une césarienne est couramment utilisé lors d'accouchement par césarienne. Les effets bénéfiques prétendusde l'utilisation de cathéters incluentle maintien du drainage de la vessie qui peut améliorer la visualisation pendant la chirurgie et minimiser la lésion vésicaleet moins de rétention urinaire après l'opération (incapacité d'uriner), mais il pourrait être associé à une incidence accrue de l'infection des voies urinaires (IVU), à une douleur urétrale, à des difficultés à uriner après le retrait du cathéter, à une ambulation retardée et à un séjour à l'hôpital prolongé.

Cette revue est basée sur cinq études portant sur 1065 femmes subissant une césarienne. Les études étaient de qualité moyenne. Les études incluses n'utilisaient pas les critères de diagnostic de cette revue concernant les IVU, il n'existe donc aucune donnée pour ce critère de jugement principal. Lorsque l'on considère les IVU, telles que définies par les auteurs des essais, il n'y avait aucune différence claire entre les groupes. Il n'y avait pas de données relatives à la lésion vésicale durant une césarienne (l'autre critère de jugement principal dela revue).

Notre analyse a montré que l'utilisation d'un cathéter urinaire était associée à moins de rétention urinaire après une césarienne. D'autre part, la douleur / la gêne duesau cathéter ou lors de la première évacuation de l’urine après une césarienne, le délai ambulatoire et la durée d'hospitalisation étaient favorables à la non-utilisation d'un cathéter urinaire. Il n'y avait aucune différence dans l'incidence des saignements utérins en raison de l’atonie utérine (relaxation de l'utérus) après l'accouchement.

Les preuves limitées de cette revue sont baséessur cinq essais de qualité modérée et les résultats devraient être pris en compte dans ce contexte. Il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves pour évaluer l'utilisation systématique de cathéter à demeure pour la vessie chez les femmes subissant une césarienne. D’autres recherches plus rigoureuses sont nécessairessur ce sujet et les futurs essais devraient utiliser un critère standardisé pour le diagnostic des IVU et les autres résultats comparables.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 6th August, 2014