Intervention Protocol

Topical anaesthesia for needle-related pain in newborn infants

  1. Jann P Foster1,*,
  2. Christine Taylor2,
  3. Sandie L Bredemeyer3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neonatal Group

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 21 NOV 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010331


How to Cite

Foster JP, Taylor C, Bredemeyer SL. Topical anaesthesia for needle-related pain in newborn infants (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD010331. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010331.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Sydney, Faculty of Medicine, Central Clinical School - Discipline of Obstetrics, Gynaecology & Neonatology & Faculty of Nursing, Sydney, NSW, Australia

  2. 2

    University of Western Sydney, Penrith, NSw, Australia

  3. 3

    Centre for Nursing & Midwifery Research, RPA Women and Babies, School of Nursing, University of Sydney, Perinatal Nursing, Sydney, NSW, Australia

*Jann P Foster, Faculty of Medicine, Central Clinical School - Discipline of Obstetrics, Gynaecology & Neonatology & Faculty of Nursing, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. j.foster@uws.edu.au. jann.foster@sydney.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

Compare the topical anaesthetics amethocaine (Ametop) and EMLA in terms of anaesthetic efficacy and safety in newborn term or preterm infants requiring an invasive procedure involving puncture of skin and other tissues with a needle.

Subgroup analysis

We will compare the effects of each topical anaesthetic in the following subgroups of patients:

  • gestational age at birth (term infants 37 weeks' gestation and above); preterm infants (29 to 36 weeks' gestation); very preterm infants (< 29 weeks' gestation);

  • type of infants (e.g. healthy newborn infants (e.g. those in the normal newborn nursery vs. sick infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)).