Intervention Review

Physician anaesthetists versus non-physician providers of anaesthesia for surgical patients

  1. Sharon R Lewis1,*,
  2. Amanda Nicholson2,
  3. Andrew F Smith3,
  4. Phil Alderson4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Anaesthesia Group

Published Online: 11 JUL 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 13 FEB 2014

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010357.pub2


How to Cite

Lewis SR, Nicholson A, Smith AF, Alderson P. Physician anaesthetists versus non-physician providers of anaesthesia for surgical patients. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD010357. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010357.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Lancaster Infirmary, Patient Safety Research, Lancaster, UK

  2. 2

    University of Liverpool, Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group, Liverpool, UK

  3. 3

    Royal Lancaster Infirmary, Department of Anaesthetics, Lancaster, Lancashire, UK

  4. 4

    National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, Manchester, UK

*Sharon R Lewis, Patient Safety Research, Royal Lancaster Infirmary, Pointer Court 1, Ashton Road, Lancaster, LA1 1RP, UK. Sharon.Lewis@mbht.nhs.uk. sharonrlewis@googlemail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 11 JUL 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laički sažetak

Background

With increasing demand for surgery, pressure on healthcare providers to reduce costs, and a predicted shortfall in the number of medically qualified anaesthetists it is important to consider whether non-physician anaesthetists (NPAs), who do not have a medical qualification, are able to provide equivalent anaesthetic services to medically qualified anaesthesia providers.

Objectives

To assess the safety and effectiveness of different anaesthetic providers for patients undergoing surgical procedures under general, regional or epidural anaesthesia. We planned to consider results from studies across countries worldwide (including developed and developing countries).

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL on 13 February 2014. Our search terms were relevant to the review question and not limited by study design or outcomes. We also carried out searches of clinical trials registers, forward and backward citation tracking and grey literature searching.

Selection criteria

We considered all randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-randomized studies (NRS), non-randomized cluster trials and observational study designs which had a comparison group. We included studies which compared an anaesthetic administered by a NPA working independently with an anaesthetic administered by either a physician anaesthetist working independently or by a NPA working in a team supervised or directed by a physician anaesthetist.

Data collection and analysis

Three review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data, contacting study authors for additional information where required. In addition to the standard methodological procedures, we based our risk of bias assessment for NRS on the specific NRS risk of bias tool presented at the UK Cochrane Contributors' Meeting in March 2012. We considered case-mix and type of surgical procedure, patient co-morbidity, type of anaesthetic given, and hospital characteristics as possible confounders in the studies, and judged how well the authors had adjusted for these confounders.

Main results

We included six NRS with 1,563,820 participants. Five were large retrospective cohort studies using routinely collected hospital or administrative data from the United States (US). The sixth was a smaller cohort study based on emergency medical care in Haiti. Two were restricted to obstetric patients whilst the others included a range of surgical procedures. It was not possible to combine data as there was a degree of heterogeneity between the included studies.

Two studies failed to find a difference in the risk of death in women undergoing caesarean section when given anaesthesia by NPAs compared with physician anaesthetists, both working independently. One study reported there was no difference in mortality between independently working provider groups. One compared mortality risks between US states that had, or had not, 'opted-out' of federal insurance requirements for physician anaesthetists to supervise or direct NPAs. This study reported a lower mortality risk for NPAs working independently compared with physician anaesthetists working independently in both 'opt-out' and 'non-opt out' states.

One study reported a lower mortality risk for NPAs working independently compared with supervised or directed NPAs. One reported a higher mortality risk for NPAs working independently than in a supervised or directed NPA group but no statistical testing was presented. One reported a lower mortality risk in the NPA group working independently compared with the supervised or directed NPA group in both 'opt-out' and 'non-opt out' states before the 'opt-out' rule was introduced, but a higher mortality risk in 'opt-out' states after the 'opt-out' rule was introduced. One reported only one death and was unable to detect a risk in mortality. One reported that the risk of mortality and failure to rescue was higher for NPAs who were categorized as undirected than for directed NPAs.

Three studies reported the risk of anaesthesia-related complications for NPAs working independently compared to physician anaesthetists working independently. Two failed to find a difference in the risk of complications in women undergoing caesarean section. One failed to find a difference in risk of complications between groups in 'non-opt out' states. This study reported a lower risk of complications for NPAs working independently than for physician anaesthetists working independently in 'opt-out' states before the 'opt-out' rule was introduced, but a higher risk after, although these differences were not tested statistically.

Two studies reported that the risk of complications was generally lower for NPAs working independently than in the NPA supervised or team group but no statistical testing was reported. One reported no evidence of increased risk of postoperative complications in an undirected NPA group versus a directed NPA group.

The risk of bias and assessment of confounders was particularly important for this review. We were concerned about the use of routine data for research and the likely accuracy of such databases to determine the intervention and control groups, thus judging four studies at medium risk of inaccuracy, one at low and one, for which there was insufficient detail, at an unclear risk. Whilst we expected that mortality would have been accurately reported in record systems, we thought reporting may not be as accurate for complications, which relied on the use of codes. Studies were therefore judged as at high risk or an unclear risk of bias for the reporting of complications data. Four of the six studies received funding, which could have influenced the reporting and interpretation of study results. Studies considered confounders of case-mix, co-morbidity and hospital characteristics with varying degrees of detail and again we were concerned about the accuracy of the coding of data in records and the variables considered during assessment. Five of the studies used multivariate logistic regression models to account for these confounders. We judged three as being at low risk, one at medium risk and one at high risk of incomplete adjustment in analysis.

Authors' conclusions

No definitive statement can be made about the possible superiority of one type of anaesthesia care over another. The complexity of perioperative care, the low intrinsic rate of complications relating directly to anaesthesia, and the potential confounding effects within the studies reviewed, all of which were non-randomized, make it impossible to provide a definitive answer to the review question.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laički sažetak

Physician anaesthetists versus nurse anaesthetists for surgical patients

Background

There is an increasing demand for surgery, pressure on healthcare providers to reduce costs, and a predicted shortfall in the number of medically qualified anaesthetists. This review aimed to consider whether anaesthesia can be provided equally effectively and safely by nurse anaesthetists (without medical qualifications) as by medically qualified anaesthetists with specialist training.

Study characteristics

The evidence was current up to 13 February 2013. We found six relevant studies, five of which were large observational studies from the US with a comparison group and with study durations from two to 11 years, and one was a much smaller 12 week study from Haiti. There were over 1.5 million participants in the studies. Information for these studies was taken from American insurance databases (Medicare) and from hospital records. The small study was based on emergency medical care after the 2008 hurricanes in Haiti.

Key results

Most studies stated that there was no difference in the number of people who died when given anaesthetic by either a nurse anaesthetist or a medically qualified anaesthetist. One study stated that there was a lower rate of death for nurse anaesthetists compared to medically qualified anaesthetists. One study stated that the risk of death was lower for nurse anaesthetists compared to those being supervised by an anaesthetist or working within an anaesthetic team, whilst another stated the risk of death was higher compared to a supervised or team approach. Other studies gave varied results. Similarly, there were variations between studies for the rates of complications for patients depending on their anaesthetic provider.

Quality of the evidence

Much of the data came from large databases, which may have contained inaccuracies in reporting. There may also be important differences between patients that might account for variation in study results, for example, whether patients who were more ill were treated by a medically qualified anaesthetist, or whether nurse anaesthetists worked in hospitals that had fewer resources. Several of the studies had allowed for these potential differences in their analysis, however it was unclear to us whether this had been done sufficiently well to allow us to be confident about the results. There was also potential confounding from the funding sources for some of these studies.

Conclusion

As none of the data were of sufficiently high quality and the studies presented inconsistent findings, we concluded that it was not possible to say whether there were any differences in care between medically qualified anaesthetists and nurse anaesthetists from the available evidence.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laički sažetak

Comparaison des anesthésies réalisées par des médecins anesthésistes et par des praticiens anesthésistes non médecins

Contexte

La demande de chirurgie va croissant, mais aussi la pression sur les coûts de santé, et il est à prévoir que le nombre d'anesthésistes médicalement qualifiés sera un jour insuffisant. Dans ces conditions, il est important d'évaluer si les anesthésistes non médecins, n'ayant pas fait d'études de médecine, peuvent assurer des services d'anesthésie d'un niveau équivalent à celui des médecins anesthésistes qualifiés.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'innocuité et l'efficacité des différents prestataires d'anesthésie dans le cadre d'opérations chirurgicales sous anesthésie générale, locorégionale ou péridurale. Nous avions prévu d'examiner les résultats d'études menées dans des pays du monde entier (nations industrialisées et pays en voie de développement).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE et CINAHL jusqu'au février 2014. Nos termes de recherche étaient pertinents en relation avec la problématique de la revue, sans limitation sur la conception ou les critères d'évaluation des études. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les registres des essais cliniques, les citations et la littérature grise.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons examiné tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), les études non randomisées (ENR), les essais en grappes non randomisés et les études d'observation comportant un groupe de comparaison. Nous avons inclus les études qui comparaient une anesthésie administrée par un anesthésiste non médecin travaillant de façon autonome avec un anesthésie administrée soit par un médecin anesthésiste travaillant de façon indépendante, soit par un anesthésiste non médecin travaillant au sein d'une équipe supervisée ou dirigée par un médecin anesthésiste.

Recueil et analyse des données

Trois auteurs de la revue ont évalué indépendamment la qualité des essais et extrait les données et ont pris contact avec les auteurs des études, si nécessaire, pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires. Outre les procédures méthodologiques standard, nous avons évalué le risque de biais des études non randomisées sur l'outil de mesure spécifique du risque de biais dans les ENR présenté lors de la réunion des Contributeurs Cochrane au Royaume-Uni de mars 2012. Nous avons examiné le case-mix et le type d'intervention chirurgicale, les comorbidités des patients, le type d'anesthésique administré et les caractéristiques de l'hôpital en tant que facteurs de confusion possibles dans les études, et évalué la façon dont les auteurs avaient tenu compte de ces facteurs de confusion.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus six ENR totalisant 1 563 820 participants. Cinq d'entre elles étaient de grandes études de cohorte rétrospectives utilisant les données hospitalières ou administratives recueillies habituellement aux États-Unis. La sixième étude était une petite étude de cohorte, basée sur des interventions médicales d'urgence en Haïti. Deux études concernaient seulement des patientes d'obstétrique, tandis que les autres couvraient diverses interventions chirurgicales. Il n'a pas été possible de combiner les données des études incluses, en raison de leur hétérogénéité.

Deux études ne montrent aucune différence dans le risque de décès parmi les femmes subissant une césarienne selon que l'anesthésie est administrée par un anesthésiste non médecin (ANM) ou par un médecin spécialiste, travaillant de façon autonome l'un comme l'autre. Une étude rapporte qu'il n'y a aucune différence de mortalité entre des groupes de praticiens travaillant de façon indépendante. Un étude compare le risque de mortalité entre les états des États-Unis ayant adopté ou refusé l'obligation imposée par les assurances fédérales que les anesthésistes non médecins soient soumis au contrôle d'un médecin anesthésiste. Cette étude fait état d'un risque de mortalité plus faible pour les anesthésistes non médecins travaillant indépendamment que pour les anesthésistes médecins travaillant indépendamment, aussi bien dans les états ayant adopté cette règle que dans ceux qui l'ont refusée.

Une étude rapporte un risque de mortalité plus faible pour les ANM travaillant indépendamment que pour les ANM supervisés ou dirigés. Une étude rapporte un risque de mortalité plus élevé pour les ANM travaillant indépendamment que dans un groupe d'ANM supervisés ou dirigés, mais ne présente aucun test statistique. Une étude rapporte un risque plus faible mortalité dans le groupe des ANM travaillant de façon indépendante que dans le groupe d'ANM supervisés ou dirigés, que ce soit dans les états ayant adopté l'obligation ou dans ceux qui l'ont refusée, avant l'introduction de cette règle, mais un risque de mortalité plus élevé dans les états ayant refusé l'obligation après l'introduction de la règle. Une étude rapporte un seul décès et n'est pas en mesure de déterminer un risque de mortalité. Une étude indique que le risque de décès et d'échec des secours était plus élevé pour les ANM classés comme non dirigés que pour ANM dirigés.

Trois études rapportent le risque de complications liées à l'anesthésie pour les ANM travaillant indépendamment par rapport à celui des médecins anesthésistes travaillant indépendamment. Deux de ces études ne trouvent aucune différence dans le risque de complications chez des femmes ayant eu une césarienne. Une autre ne trouve aucune différence de risque de complications entre les groupes dans les états américains qui n'ont pas refusé l'obligation. Cette étude fait état d'un risque plus faible de complications pour les ANM travaillant indépendamment que pour les médecins anesthésistes travaillant indépendamment dans les états ayant renoncé à l'obligation avant l'introduction de la règle de renonciation mais un risque plus élevé après son introduction, mais ces différences n'ont pas été vérifiées statistiquement.

Deux études rapportent un risque de complications globalement inférieur pour les ANM travaillant indépendamment que pour les ANM supervisés ou travaillant en équipe, mais ne rapportent aucune vérification statistique. Une étude ne rapporte aucune preuve d'un risque accru de complications postopératoires dans un groupe d'ANM non dirigés par rapport à un groupe d'ANM dirigés.

Le risque de biais et l'évaluation des facteurs de confusion étaient particulièrement importants pour cette revue. Nous étions préoccupés par l'utilisation des données de routine pour la recherche et par l'exactitude probable de ces bases de données pour la détermination des groupes d'intervention et de contrôle. Dans ces conditions, nous avons jugé que le risque d'inexactitude était moyen pour quatre études, faible pour une autre et indéfini pour une dernière qui ne donnait pas suffisamment de détails. Alors que nous attendions à ce que la mortalité soit rapportée de façon précise dans les systèmes de dossiers médicaux, nous pensions que les rapports ne seraient peut-être pas aussi précis en ce qui concerne les complications, pour lesquelles des codes sont utilisés. Nous avons donc jugé que le risque de biais des études était risque ou incertain en ce qui concerne la communication des données relatives aux complications. Quatre des six études ont reçu un financement, ce qui pourrait avoir influencé le compte-rendu et l'interprétation de leurs résultats. Les facteurs de confusion examinés dans les études, de façon plus ou moins détaillée, étaient le case-mix, les comorbidités et les caractéristiques des hôpitaux ; ici encore, nous nous sommes inquiétés de l'exactitude du codage des données dans les registres et les variables considérées lors de l'évaluation. Cinq des études ont utilisé des modèles de régression logistique multivariée pour tenir compte de ces facteurs de confusion. Nous avons jugé trois d'entre elles comme étant à faible risque, une à risque moyen et une à haut risque d'ajustement incomplet dans l'analyse.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous ne sommes pas en mesure de formuler un avis concluant à propos de l'éventuelle supériorité d'un type de procédure d'anesthésie sur une autre. La complexité des soins périopératoires, le faible taux intrinsèque de complications directement liées à l'anesthésie et les effets de confusion potentiels dans les études examinées, dont aucune n'était randomisée, nous empêchent de répondre de façon définitive à la question posée pour la revue.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laički sažetak

Comparaison des anesthésistes médecins et infirmiers pour les patients chirurgicaux

Contexte

La demande de chirurgie va croissant, mais aussi la pression sur les coûts de santé, et il est à prévoir que le nombre d'anesthésistes médicalement qualifiés sera un jour insuffisant. La présente revue visait à déterminer si l'anesthésie pourrait être assurée de manière aussi efficace et sûre par des infirmiers ou infirmières anesthésistes (non médecins) que par des médecins anesthésistes ayant suivi des études spécialisées.

Caractéristiques des études

Les preuves sont à jour à la date du 13 février 2013. Nous avons trouvé six études pertinentes : cinq grandes études observationnelles menées aux États-Unis, avec un groupe de comparaison et sur des durées de 2 à 11 ans, et une étude beaucoup plus petite réalisée à Haïti sur 12 semaines. Ces études totalisent plus de 1,5 million de participants. Les informations concernant ces études sont tirées des bases de données d'assurance américaines (Medicare) et des registres hospitaliers. La petite étude est basée sur des interventions médicales d'urgence faisant suite aux ouragans de 2008 en Haïti.

Principaux résultats

La plupart des études indiquent qu'il n'y a eu aucune différence dans le nombre de décès quand l'anesthésie était administrée par un infirmier anesthésiste ou par un médecin anesthésiste spécialisé. Une étude indique un taux inférieur de décès avec les infirmiers anesthésistes par rapport aux anesthésistes médicalement qualifiés. Une étude indique que le risque de décès est plus faible avec les infirmiers anesthésistes que lorsque l'infirmier est supervisé par un anesthésiste ou travaille au sein d'une équipe d'anesthésie, tandis qu'un autre rapporte un risque de décès était plus élevé par rapport à une approche supervisée ou en équipe. Les autres études donnent des résultats disparates. De même, il y a des variations entre les études sur les taux de complications pour les patients en fonction de la personne qui réalise l'anesthésie.

Qualité des preuves

Une grande partie des données provient de grandes bases de données, dont les rapports peuvent être grevés d'inexactitudes. Il peut aussi y avoir des différences importantes entre les patients, ce qui pourrait expliquer les variations dans les résultats des études : par exemple, si les patients les plus malades étaient traités par un médecin anesthésiste, ou si les infirmiers anesthésistes travaillaient dans des hôpitaux qui avaient moins de ressources. Plusieurs études tiennent compte de ces différences possibles dans l'analyse, mais nous n'avons pas pu établir si cette prise en compte était suffisamment bien appliquée pour que l'on puisse se fier aux résultats. Il y avait aussi un risque de confusion lié aux des sources de financement de certaines de ces études.

Conclusion

Comme aucune des données n'était de qualité suffisante et que les études formulaient des conclusions incohérentes, nous avons conclu qu'il ne était pas possible de dire s'il y avait des différences entre les soins dispensés par des médecins anesthésistes et ceux assurés par des infirmiers anesthésistes sur la base des preuves disponibles.

Notes de traduction

Traduction réalisée par le Centre Cochrane Français

 

Laički sažetak

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laički sažetak

Liječnici anesteziolozi ili sestre anesteziolozi za kirurške pacijente

Pozadina

Zahtjevi za kirurškim uslugama sve su veći, kao i pritisak na zdravstvo da se smanje troškovi medicinskih usluga, a ujedno se predviđa smanjenje broja liječnika anesteziologa. Ovaj Cochrane sustavni pregled pokušao je analizirati mogu li sestre obrazovane kao anesteziolozi (dakle, medicinsko osoblje koje nema liječničko obrazovanje) jednako sigurno i učinkovito provoditi anesteziju kao i liječnici specijalisti anesteziolozi.

Karakteristike studija

Pretražena je literatura objavljena do 13. veljače 2013. Pronađeno je 6 studija koje su odgovarale na postavljeno pitanje, od čega su pet velike obzervacijske studije iz SAD-a s usporednom skupinom i koje su trajale 2-11 godina. Šesta je studija bila mnogo manja, provedena u Haitiju, i trajala je 12 tjedana. U svim studijama sudjelovalo je više od 1,5 milijuna ispitanika. Informacije za te studije dobivene su iz američkih baza podataka osiguranja (Medicare) i bolničkih kartona. Mala studija iz Haitija temeljila se na informacijama o pružanju hitne medicinske pomoći nakon uragana iz 2008. godine.

Ključni rezultati

Većina je studija utvrdila da nema razlike u broju ljudi koji su umrli nakon što su dobili anestetik od sestre anesteziologa ili liječnika anesteziologa. U jednoj studiji se navodi da je učestalost smrti bila manja kod sestara anesteziologa u usporedbi s liječnicima anesteziolozima. U jednoj studiji se navodi da je rizik od smrti bio manji kod sestara anesteziologa u usporedbi s onima koje je nadzirao anesteziolog ili koji su radili u okviru anesteziološkog tima, dok su druge našle veći rizik od smrti u usporedbi s nadziranjem ili timskim pristupom. Druge su studij dale različite rezultate. Isto tako su utvrđene varijacije između studija kad je u pitanju učestalost komplikacija kod pacijenata, ovisno o tome tko provodi anesteziju.

Kvaliteta dokaza

Većina podataka potjecala je iz velikih baza, koje mogu sadržavati netočnosti u bilježenju informacija. Također treba voditi računa da su u studijama možda postojale važne razlike među uključenim pacijentima koje su mogle utjecati na razlike u dobivenim rezultatima. Na primjer, možda su pacijenti koji su bili bolesniji povjereni liječnicima anesteziolozima, ili su možda sestre anesteziolozi radile u bolnicama koje imaju manje financijskih sredstava na raspolaganju. Nekolicina studija spominje da su mogući utjecaji tih čimbenika na razlike u njihovim analizama, ali nije jasno jesu li svi ti mogući čimbenici uzeti u obzir pri analizama kako bismo mogli vjerovati njihovim rezultatima. Izvor financiranja nekih studija također je mogao potencijalno utjecati na rezultate.

Zaključak

Budući pronađeni podatci nisu bili visoke kvalitete i studije su pokazale nedosljedne rezultate, autori Cochrane sustavnog pregleda zaključuju da trenutno nije moguće reći na temelju dostupnih dokaza postoje li razlike u kvaliteti skrbi koju pružaju liječnici anesteziolozi u usporedbi sa sestrama anesteziolozima.

Bilješke prijevoda

Hrvatski Cochrane ogranak.
Prevela: Livia Puljak