Intervention Review

Vitamin C for asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

  1. Stephen J Milan1,*,
  2. Anna Hart2,
  3. Mark Wilkinson3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Airways Group

Published Online: 23 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 19 DEC 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010391.pub2

How to Cite

Milan SJ, Hart A, Wilkinson M. Vitamin C for asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD010391. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010391.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    St George's University of London, Population Health Sciences and Education, London, UK

  2. 2

    Lancaster University, Lancaster Medical School, Clinical Research Hub, Lancaster, Lancashire, UK

  3. 3

    University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, Lancaster, UK

*Stephen J Milan, Population Health Sciences and Education, St George's University of London, London, UK. smilan@sgul.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 23 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Dietary antioxidants, such as vitamin C, in the epithelial lining and lining fluids of the lung may be beneficial in the reduction of oxidative damage (Arab 2002). They may therefore be of benefit in reducing symptoms of inflammatory airway conditions such as asthma, and may also be beneficial in reducing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, which is a well-recognised feature of asthma and is considered a marker of airways inflammation. However, the association between dietary antioxidants and asthma severity or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction is not fully understood.

Objectives

To examine the effects of vitamin C supplementation on exacerbations and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in adults and children with asthma or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction compared to placebo or no vitamin C.

Search methods

We identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Group's Specialised Register (CAGR). The Register contains trial reports identified through systematic searches of a number of bibliographic databases, and handsearching of journals and meeting abstracts. We also searched trial registry websites. The searches were conducted in December 2012.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We included both adults and children with a diagnosis of asthma. In separate analyses we considered trials with a diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (or exercise-induced asthma). We included trials comparing vitamin C supplementation with placebo, or vitamin C supplementation with no supplementation. We included trials where the asthma management of both treatment and control groups provided similar background therapy. The primary focus of the review is on daily vitamin C supplementation to prevent exacerbations and improve HRQL. The short-term use of vitamin C at the time of exacerbations or for cold symptoms in people with asthma are outside the scope of this review.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently screened the titles and abstracts of potential studies, and subsequently screened full text study reports for inclusion. We used standard methods expected by The Cochrane Collaboration.

Main results

A total of 11 trials with 419 participants met our inclusion criteria. In 10 studies the participants were adults and only one was in children. Reporting of study design was inadequate to determine risk of bias for most of the studies and poor availability of data for our key outcomes may indicate some selective outcome reporting. Four studies were parallel-group and the remainder were cross-over studies. Eight studies included people with asthma and three studies included 40 participants with exercise-induced asthma. Five studies reported results using single-dose regimes prior to bronchial challenges or exercise tests. There was marked heterogeneity in vitamin C dosage regimes used in the selected studies, compounding the difficulties in carrying out meaningful analyses.

One study on 201 adults with asthma reported no significant difference in our primary outcome, health-related quality of life (HRQL), and overall the quality of this evidence was low. There were no data available to evaluate the effects of vitamin C supplementation on our other primary outcome, exacerbations in adults. One small study reported data on asthma exacerbations in children and there were no exacerbations in either the vitamin C or placebo groups (very low quality evidence). In another study conducted in 41 adults, exacerbations were not defined according to our criteria and the data were not available in a format suitable for evaluation by our methods. Lung function and symptoms data were contributed by single studies. We rated the quality of this evidence as moderate, but further research is required to assess any clinical implications that may be related to the changes in these parameters. In each of these outcomes there was no significant difference between vitamin C and placebo. No adverse events at all were reported; again this is very low quality evidence.

Studies in exercise-induced bronchoconstriction suggested some improvement in lung function measures with vitamin C supplementation, but theses studies were few and very small, with limited data and we judged the quality of the evidence to be low.

Authors' conclusions

Currently, evidence is not available to provide a robust assessment on the use of vitamin C in the management of asthma or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Further research is very likely to have an important impact on our confidence in the estimates of effect and is likely to change the estimates. There is no indication currently that vitamin C can be recommended as a therapeutic agent in asthma. There was some indication that vitamin C was helpful in exercise-induced breathlessness in terms of lung function and symptoms; however, as these findings were provided only by small studies they are inconclusive. Most published studies to date are too small and inconsistent to provide guidance. Well-designed trials with good quality clinical endpoints, such as exacerbation rates and health-related quality of life scores, are required.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Vitamin C for asthma and exercise-induced breathlessness

Review question

This review considered the question of whether vitamin C may be helpful for people with asthma or exercise-induced breathlessness.

Background

Asthma is an inflammatory lung condition characterised by the narrowing of airways and is associated with wheezing, breathlessness, cough and chest tightness. Vitamin C has been suggested as a possible treatment for asthma.

Study characteristics

Eleven studies on 419 people with asthma or exercise-induced breathlessness were included in this review comparing vitamin C compared to placebo (no vitamin C). Most studies were in adults and one small study was in children. The small number of studies available for review and their different designs meant that we were only able to describe individual studies, rather than pooling the results together to get an average from the trials. The study design was not well described in most study reports and therefore it was impossible to determine risk of bias for most of the studies. There was very little data available in the trials for our key outcomes and this may indicate some selective outcome reporting.

Key results

There was no indication of benefit from the studies that considered vitamin C in relation to asthma. However, it is not possible to form any clear conclusions on the basis of those studies at this stage. The review concludes that there is insufficient evidence currently available to evaluate the use of vitamin C as a treatment in asthma. Larger, well-designed research is needed to provide clearer guidance. There was some indication that vitamin C was helpful in exercise-induced breathlessness in terms of how easily people breathe and their symptoms; however, as these findings were provided by only very small studies they do not provide complete answers to guide treatment.

Quality of the evidence

Details of the way patients were allocated to receive vitamin C or not were not clearly described in 10 of the 11 studies and we considered this carefully in the review in relation to our level of uncertainty in interpreting the results. Taking this into account, together with the imprecision of the results, we judged the estimates of the usefulness of vitamin C as a treatment to be of either low or moderate quality in relation to asthma.

Additionally, for exercise-induced breathlessness the three studies providing data to the review were small and we are mindful of the need to draw very cautious conclusions about the results.

This plain language summary is current as of December 2012.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

La vitamine C pour le traitement de l'asthme et de la bronchoconstriction provoquée par l'exercice

Contexte

Les antioxydants alimentaires, tels que la vitamine C, dans la muqueuse épithélial et les liquides muqueux du poumon, pourraient être bénéfiques dans la réduction du stress oxydatif (Arab 2002). Ils peuvent donc être bénéfiques pour réduire les symptômes des affections inflammatoires des voies respiratoires telles que l'asthme et peuvent également être bénéfiques dans la réduction de la bronchoconstriction provoquée par l'exercice, qui est une caractéristique bien reconnue de l'asthme et est considérée comme un marqueur de l'inflammation des voies respiratoires. Cependant, l'association entre les antioxydants et la gravité de l'asthme ou la bronchoconstriction provoquée par l'exercice n’est pas entièrement assimilée.

Objectifs

Examiner les effets de la supplémentation en vitamine C sur les exacerbations et la qualité de vie liée à la santé (QVLS) chez les adultes et les enfants souffrant d'asthme ou de bronchoconstriction provoquée par l'exercice par rapport à un placebo ou à l'absence de vitamine C.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons identifié des essais dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les voies respiratoires. Ce registre contient des rapports d'essais identifiés par des recherches systématiques dans plusieurs bases de données bibliographiques, des recherches manuelles dans les journaux et des résumés de conférences. Nous avons également consulté les sites Internet des registres d'essais. Les recherches ont été effectuées en décembre 2012.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR). Nous avons inclus les adultes et les enfants souffrants d’asthme. Dans des analyses séparées, nous avons pris en compte les essais présentant un diagnostic de la bronchoconstriction provoquée par l'exercice (ou l'asthme d'effort). Nous avons inclus les essais comparant la supplémentation en vitamine C à un placebo, ou la supplémentation en vitamine C à l'absence de supplémentation. Nous avons inclus les essais dans lesquels la prise en charge de l'asthme fournissait des traitements de fond similaires, ceci dans les groupes de traitement et les groupes témoins. Le principal objectif de cette revue porte sur la prise quotidienne de la supplémentation en vitamine C pour prévenir les exacerbations et améliorer la QVLS. L'utilisation à court terme de la vitamine C au moment d'exacerbations ou pour les symptômes du rhume banal chez les personnes atteintes d'asthme ne figurent pas dans cette revue.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment passé au crible les titres et résumés des études potentiellement pertinentes et examiné les textes des rapports d'étude pour l'inclusion. Nous avons utilisé la méthode standard prévue par la Collaboration Cochrane.

Résultats Principaux

Onze essais, comportant 419 participants, répondaient à nos critères d'inclusion. Dans 10 études, les participants étaient des adultes et une seule portait sur les enfants. Dans la plupart des études, le rapport des plans d'étude n'était pas suffisant pour déterminer le risque de biais. De plus, la faible disponibilité des données pour nos résultats principaux peut indiquer un rapport sélectif des résultats. Quatre études étaient en groupes parallèles et les autres étaient des études croisées. Huit études incluaient des personnes asthmatiques et trois études totalisaient 40 participants atteints d'asthme d'effort. Cinq études rapportaient des résultats en utilisant des doses uniques avant des défis bronchiques ou des tests d'exercice. Il y avait une hétérogénéité marquée dans les dosages de vitamine C utilisés dans les études sélectionnées, provoquant des difficultés à réaliser des analyses.

Une étude sur 201 adultes asthmatiques ne rapportait aucune différence significative dans notre critère de jugement principal, la qualité de vie liée à la santé (QVLS) et la qualité globale de ces preuves étaient faible. Aucune donnée n’était disponible pour évaluer les effets de la supplémentation en vitamine C avec nos autres résultats primaires, les exacerbations chez les adultes. Une étude de petite taille a rapporté des données sur les crises d'asthme chez les enfants et il n'y avait ni exacerbation de vitamine C, ni groupe sous placebo (preuves de très faible qualité). Dans une autre étude menée sur 41 adultes, les exacerbations n’étaient pas définies conformément à nos critères d'inclusion et les données n'étaient pas disponibles dans un format éligible par notre méthode pour l'évaluation. Les données correspondant à la fonction pulmonaire et aux symptômes ont été fournies par des études individuelles. La qualité de ces preuves était modérée, mais des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour évaluer les implications cliniques qui peuvent être liées aux changements dans ces paramètres. Dans chacun de ces critères de jugement, il n'y avait aucune différence significative entre la vitamine C et un placebo. Aucun événement indésirable n’a été rapporté, les preuves sont également de très faible qualité.

Les études portant sur la bronchoconstriction provoquée par l'exercice suggéraient une certaine amélioration de la fonction pulmonaire avec la supplémentation en vitamine C, mais les études étaient peu nombreuses et de petite taille, avec des données limitées et des preuves de faible qualité.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves ne sont actuellement pas disponibles pour fournir une évaluation solide sur l'utilisation de la vitamine C dans la prise en charge de l'asthme ou de la bronchoconstriction provoquée par l'exercice. D'autres recherches sont très susceptibles d'avoir un impact important sur notre confiance dans les estimations de l'effet et sont susceptibles de modifier les estimations. À ce jour, aucune donnée n’indique que la vitamine C peut être recommandée en tant qu'agent thérapeutique dans le traitement de l'asthme. Certaines données indiquaient que la vitamine C était utile dans le traitement de la dyspnée provoquée par l'exercice pour la fonction pulmonaire et les symptômes; toutefois, étant donné que ces résultats ont été fournis uniquement par des études de petite taille, ils ne sont pas concluants. La plupart des études publiées à ce jour sont trop petites et trop contradictoires pour fournir des informations supplémentaires. Des essais bien planifiés, avec des critères de jugement cliniques de bonne qualité, tels que les taux d'exacerbation et les résultats portant sur la qualité de vie liée à la santé, sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

La vitamine C pour le traitement de l'asthme et de la bronchoconstriction provoquée par l'exercice

La vitamine C pour le traitement de l'asthme et de la dyspnée provoquée par l'exercice

Question de la revue

Cette revue a cherché à savoir si la vitamine C pourrait être utile pour les personnes souffrant d'asthme ou de dyspnée provoquée par l'exercice.

Contexte

L’asthme est une affection pulmonaire inflammatoire qui se caractérise par le rétrécissement des voies respiratoires et est associé à une respiration sifflante, un essoufflement, de la toux et une sensation d'oppression. La vitamine C a été proposée comme traitement possible de l'asthme.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Onze études totalisant 419 personnes souffrants d'asthme ou de dyspnée provoquée par l'exercice ont été inclues dans cette revue comparant la vitamine C au placebo (absence de vitamine C). La plupart des études portaient sur les adultes et une petite étude portait sur les enfants. Du fait du petit nombre d'études disponibles pour la revue et de leurs différents plans d’étude, nous n’avons pu décrire que les études individuelles, plutôt que de regrouper les résultats pour obtenir une moyenne des essais. Le plan d'étude n'était pas correctement décrit dans la plupart des rapports d'étude et par conséquent, il était impossible de déterminer le risque de biais pour la plupart des études. Très peu de données étaient disponibles dans les essais pour nos principaux critères de jugement et cela pourrait signifier des rapports sélectifs de résultats.

Les principaux résultats

Aucune étude n’indiquait de bénéfice de la vitamine C en tant que traitement de l'asthme. Cependant, à ce stade, il n'est pas possible d'établir de conclusions claires sur la base de ces études. Cette revue conclut qu'il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves actuellement disponibles pour évaluer l'utilisation de la vitamine C en tant que traitement de l'asthme. Des recherches supplémentaires plus larges et bien planifiées sont nécessaires pour fournir des conseils plus clairs. Certaines données indiquaient que la vitamine C a été utile en tant que traitement de la dyspnée provoquée par l'exercice en termes de symptômes et de facilité à respirer. Toutefois, étant donné que ces résultats ont été fournis par de très petites études, ils ne fournissent pas de réponses complètes pour orienter le traitement.

Qualité des preuves

La manière dont les patients étaient assignés à recevoir de la vitamine C ou non n'était pas clairement décrite dans 10 des 11 études et nous avons considéré ceci de façon approfondie dans la revue en termes de notre niveau d'incertitude dans l'interprétation des résultats. Du fait de cette prise en compte et de l'imprécision des résultats, nous avons jugé que les estimations de l'utilité de la vitamine C en tant que traitement pour l’asthme étaient d'une qualité faible à modérée.

De plus, pour la dyspnée provoquée par l'exercice, les trois études fournissant des données pour la revue étaient de petite taille et nous sommes conscients de la nécessité à être très prudents pour tirer des conclusions concernant les résultats.

Ce résumé simplifié est à jour en décembre 2012.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�