Breastfeeding for oral health in preschool children

  • Protocol
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Amit Arora,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Sydney, Population Oral Health, Westmead, NSW, Australia
    2. Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia
    3. Sydney and Sydney South West Local Health District, Sydney, Australia
    • Amit Arora, Population Oral Health, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Sydney, 1 Mons Road, Westmead, NSW, 2145, Australia. amit.arora@sydney.edu.au.

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  • Jann P Foster,

    1. University of Western Sydney, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    2. University of Sydney, Central Clinical School, Discipline of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Neonatology, Sydney Medical School/Sydney Nursing School, Sydney, NSW, Australia
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  • Donna Gillies,

    1. Western Sydney and Nepean Blue Mountains Local Health Districts - Mental Health, Parramatta, NSW, Australia
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  • Annette J Moxey,

    1. Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Research Centre for Gender, Health & Ageing, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia
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  • Gwen Moody,

    1. Westmead Hospital, CMC Postnatal Service and Infant Care, Wentworthville, NSW, Australia
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  • Bradley Curtis

    1. Eli Lily and Company, Carmel, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
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Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

Primary

  •  To compare the rates of dental caries in children who were bottle fed as infants to children who were breastfed up to six months, between 6 and 12 months, or longer

Secondary

  • To compare the rates of dental caries in children who were: demand breastfed, non-demand breastfed

  • To compare the rates of dental caries in children who were: breastfed via direct nursing, breastfed via a bottle, bottle fed with infant formula

  • To compare the rates of dental caries in children who were: exclusively breastfed, partially breastfed, exclusively bottle fed with infant formula

  • To compare the rates of dental caries in children who were: breastfed during day and night time, breastfed during the day only

This review examines the hypotheses that breastfed children would have lower rates of dental caries than bottle fed infants.