Intervention Review

Subcutaneous closure versus no subcutaneous closure after non-caesarean surgical procedures

  1. Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy1,*,
  2. Clare D Toon2,
  3. Brian R Davidson1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Wounds Group

Published Online: 21 JAN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 29 AUG 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010425.pub2


How to Cite

Gurusamy KS, Toon CD, Davidson BR. Subcutaneous closure versus no subcutaneous closure after non-caesarean surgical procedures. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD010425. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010425.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Department of Surgery, London, UK

  2. 2

    West Sussex County Council, Public Health, Chichester, West Sussex, UK

*Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy, Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Royal Free Hospital, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 2PF, UK. kurinchi2k@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 21 JAN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Most surgical procedures involve a cut in the skin that allows the surgeon to gain access to the surgical site. Most surgical wounds are closed fully at the end of the procedure, and this review focuses on these. The human body has multiple layers of tissues, and the skin is the outermost of these layers. The loose connective tissue just beneath the skin is called subcutaneous tissue, and this generally contains fat. There is uncertainty about closure of subcutaneous tissue after surgery: some surgeons advocate closure of subcutaneous tissue, as they consider this closes dead space and leads to a decrease in wound complications; others consider closure of subcutaneous tissue to be an unnecessary step that increases operating time and involves the use of additional suture material without offering any benefit.

Objectives

To compare the benefits (such as decreased wound-related complications) and consequences (such as increased operating time) of subcutaneous closure compared with no subcutaneous closure in participants undergoing non-caesarean surgical procedures.

Search methods

In August 2013 we searched the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 29 August, 2013); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 7); Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to August Week 3 2013); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations August 28, 2013); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 2013 Week 34); and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 23 August 2013). We did not restrict studies with respect to language, date of publication or study setting.

Selection criteria

We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing subcutaneous closure with no subcutaneous closure irrespective of the nature of the suture material(s) or whether continuous or interrupted sutures were used. We included all RCTs in the analysis, regardless of language, publication status, publication year, or sample size.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently identified the trials and extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for comparing binary (dichotomous) outcomes between the groups and calculated the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI for continuous outcomes. We performed meta-analysis using the fixed-effect model and random-effects model. We performed intention-to-treat analysis whenever possible.

Main results

Eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Six of the trials provided data for this review and all of these were at high risk of bias. Six trials randomised a total of 815 participants to subcutaneous closure (410 participants) or no subcutaneous closure (405 participants). Overall, 7.7% of participants (63/815 of participants) developed superficial surgical site infections and there was no clear evidence of a difference between the two intervention groups (RR 0.84; 95% CI 0.53 to 1.33; very low quality evidence). Only two trials reported superficial wound dehiscence, with 7.9% (17/215) of participants developing the problem. It is not clear whether the lack of reporting of this outcome in other trials was because it did not occur, or was not measured. There was no clear evidence of a between-group difference in the proportion of participants who developed superficial wound dehiscence in the trials that reported this outcome (RR 0.56; 95% CI 0.22 to 1.41; very low quality evidence). Only one trial reported deep wound dehiscence, which occurred in 8.3% (5/60) of participants. There was no clear evidence of a difference in the proportion of participants who developed deep wound dehiscence between the two groups (RR 0.25; 95% CI 0.03 to 2.11; very low quality evidence). Three trials reported the length of hospital stay and found no significant difference between groups (MD 0.10 days; 95% CI -0.45 to 0.64; very low quality evidence). We do not know whether this review reveals a lack of effect or lack of evidence of effect. The confidence intervals for these outcomes were wide, and significant benefits or harms from subcutaneous closure cannot be ruled out. In addition, none of the trials assessed the impact of subcutaneous closure on quality of life, long-term patient outcomes (the follow-up period in the trials varied between one week and two months after surgery) or financial implications to the healthcare provider.

Authors' conclusions

There is currently evidence of very low quality which is insufficient to support or refute subcutaneous closure after non-caesarean operations. The use of subcutaneous closure has the potential to affect patient outcomes and utilisation of healthcare resources. Further well-designed trials at low risk of bias are necessary.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Stitching versus no stitching of the tissue beneath the skin (subcutaneous tissue) for non-childbirth surgery

Surgeons cut the skin in most surgical operations. Most surgical wounds are sewn up at the end of the procedure. The skin is the outermost of many layers of tissue in the human body, with subcutaneous tissue just beneath. Stitching (suturing) subcutaneous tissue after surgery is controversial. Some surgeons recommend it, claiming this decreases wound complications, while others think it is unnecessary and may increase wound complications. We investigated whether subcutaneous tissue should be sutured after non-childbirth surgery by searching the medical literature thoroughly (up to August 2013) for studies that compared subcutaneous suturing against no subcutaneous suturing. We included only randomised controlled trials - which provide the best information - reported in any language, published in any year, and with any number of participants. Two review authors independently identified trials and extracted information.

We identified six randomised controlled trials that reported one or more of the outcomes we thought were important. There may have been flaws in trial conduct that could produce incorrect results. The six trials that provided data for this review included 815 participants (410 participants had subcutaneous closure of incisions and 405 participants did not). In the trials that reported the outcomes, overall 7% of participants developed superficial wound infection, 8% of participants developed superficial separation of wounds, and 8% of participants developed deeper separation of layers in both the groups but there was no clear evidence of a difference in incidence between the subcutaneous closure group and the no subcutaneous closure group. There was no clear evidence of a difference in the length of hospital stay between the groups. We do not know whether these results indicate that there is really no difference between subcutaneous closure and no subcutaneous closure, or that there are problems with study design that make it difficult to identify true differences between the two techniques. So significant benefits or harms of subcutaneous closure cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, no trial assessed the impact of subcutaneous closure on quality of life, long-term patient outcomes (trial follow-up periods varied between one week and two months after surgery) or financial implications to healthcare providers. There is currently no evidence to support or condemn subcutaneous closure after non-childbirth surgery. Further well-designed trials are necessary.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Fermeture sous-cutanée par rapport à l'absence de fermeture sous-cutanée suite à une procédure chirurgicale autre que la césarienne

Contexte

La plupart des procédures chirurgicales impliquent une incision dans la peau qui permet au chirurgien d'accéder au site chirurgical. La plupart des plaies chirurgicales sont refermées entièrement à la fin de la procédure et cette revue se concentre sur ces procédures. Le corps humain possède plusieurs couches de tissus et la peau est la couche la plus supérieure. Le tissu conjonctif lâche situé juste au-dessous de la peau est connu sous le nom de tissu sous-cutané et il contient généralement de la matière grasse. Il existe une incertitude quant à la fermeture du tissu sous-cutané après l'opération : certains chirurgiens préconisent la fermeture du tissu sous-cutané, comme ils considèrent que cela referme l’espace mort et conduit à une diminution des complications; d'autres considèrent que la fermeture du tissu sous-cutané est une étape inutile qui augmente la durée de l'opération et implique l'utilisation de matériaux de suture supplémentaires sans offrir aucun bénéfice.

Objectifs

Comparer les bénéfices (tels qu'une réduction de complications de la plaie) et les conséquences (telles qu’une augmentation de la durée de l'opération) de la fermeture sous-cutanée par rapport à l'absence de fermeture sous-cutanée chez des participants subissant des procédures chirurgicales autres que la césarienne.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

En août 2013, nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes : le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les plaies et contusions (recherche effectuée le 29 août 2013) ; le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2013, numéro 7) ; Ovid MEDLINE (de 1946 à la 3ème semaine d'août 2013) ; Ovid MEDLINE (les citations en cours et non-indexées, 28 août 2013) ; Ovid EMBASE (de 1974 à la 34ème semaine de 2013) et EBSCO CINAHL (de 1982 au 23 août 2013). Aucune restriction n’a été appliquée concernant la langue, la date de publication ou le contexte de l'étude.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons uniquement inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant la fermeture sous-cutanée à l'absence de fermeture sous-cutanée, indépendamment de la nature du matériel (ou des matériaux) de suture ou si les sutures continues ou discontinues étaient utilisées. Nous avons inclus tous les ECR dans l'analyse, indépendamment de la langue, du statut de publication, de l’année de publication ou de la taille des échantillons.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment identifié les essais et extrait les données. Nous avons calculé le risque relatif (RR) avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% pour la comparaison des critères de jugement binaires (dichotomiques) entre les groupes et calculé la différence moyenne (DM) avec un IC à 95% pour les résultats continus. Nous avons effectué une méta-analyse en utilisant un modèle à effets fixes et un modèle à effets aléatoires. Nous avons effectué une analyse en intention de traiter lorsque cela était possible.

Résultats Principaux

Huit ECR remplissaient les critères d'inclusion. Six des essais ont fourni des données pour cette revue et tous étaient à risque de biais élevé. Six essais ont randomisé un total de 815 participants pour la fermeture sous-cutanée (410 participants) ou l'absence de fermeture sous-cutanée (405 participants). Dans l'ensemble, 7,7% des participants (63/815 participants) ont développé des infections superficielles du site opératoire et il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'une différence entre les deux groupes d'intervention (RR 0,84 ; IC à 95% 0,53 à 1,33; preuves de très faible qualité). Seuls deux essais rapportaient la déhiscence de la plaie superficielle, avec 7,9% (17/215) des participants développant le problème. Il n'est pas clair si le manque de notification de ce critère de jugement dans d'autres essais était dû au fait que le problème ne s’était pas produit ou n'avait pas été mesuré. Il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'une différence entre les groupes dans la proportion de participants ayant développé une déhiscence superficielle de la plaie dans les essais qui rapportaient ce critère de jugement (RR 0,56 ; IC à 95 % 0,22 à 1,41 ; preuves de très faible qualité). Un seul essai rapportait une déhiscence profonde des plaies qui était survenue chez 8,3% (5/60) des participants. Il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'une différence dans la proportion de participants ayant développé une déhiscence profonde des plaies entre les deux groupes (RR 0,25 ; IC à 95% 0,03 à 2,11; preuves de qualité très médiocre). Trois essais rapportaient la durée du séjour à l'hôpital et n'ont trouvé aucune différence significative entre les groupes (DM 0,10 jours ; IC à 95% -0,45 à 0,64 ; preuves de très faible qualité). Nous ne savons pas si cette revue révèle une absence d'effet ou un manque de preuves de l'effet. Les intervalles de confiance pour ces critères de jugement étaient larges et les effets significatifs bénéfiques ou délétères de la fermeture sous-cutanée ne peuvent pas être exclus. De plus, aucun de ces essais n’évaluait l'impact de la fermeture sous-cutanée sur la qualité de vie, les résultats des patients à long terme (la période de suivi dans les essais variait entre une semaine et deux mois après l'opération) ou les implications financières pour les donneurs de soins.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il existe actuellement des preuves de très faible qualité qui sont insuffisantes pour soutenir ou réfuter la fermeture sous-cutanée après une opération autre que la césarienne. L'utilisation de la fermeture sous-cutanée peut affecter les résultats des patients et l'utilisation des ressources médicales. D'autres essais bien conçus à faible risque de biais sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Fermeture sous-cutanée par rapport à l'absence de fermeture sous-cutanée suite à une procédure chirurgicale autre que la césarienne

La suture par rapport à l'absence de suture du tissu sous la peau (tissu sous-cutané) pour la chirurgie autre que la césarienne

Les chirurgiens incisent la peau dans la plupart des opérations chirurgicales. La plupart des plaies chirurgicales sont recousues à la fin de la procédure. La peau est la couche de tissu la plus extérieure de nombreuses couches de tissu dans le corps humain, avec un tissu sous-cutané juste au-dessous. Suturer le tissu sous-cutané après la chirurgie est controversé. Certains chirurgiens le recommandent, affirmant que cela réduit les complications des plaies, alors que d'autres estiment que cela est inutile et peut accroître les complications des plaies. Nous avons tenté de déterminer si un tissu sous-cutané devrait être suturé après une chirurgie autre que la césarienne par une recherche exhaustive dans la littérature médicale (jusqu'en août 2013) pour les études qui comparaient la suture sous-cutanée à une absence de suture sous-cutanée. Nous avons uniquement inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés, qui fournissent les meilleures informations – sans restriction de langue, d’années de publication ou du nombre de participants. Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment identifié les essais et extrait les informations.

Nous avons identifié six essais contrôlés randomisés qui ont rapporté un ou plusieurs critères de jugement que nous avons considéré être importants. Le déroulement des essais peut avoir certaines imperfections qui ont pu produire des résultats incorrects. Les six essais qui ont fourni des données pour cette revue incluaient 815 participants (410 participants recevaient une fermeture sous-cutanée des incisions et 405 participants n’en recevaient pas). Dans les essais qui avaient rendu compte de critères de jugement, globalement 7% des participants développaient une infection superficielle de la plaie, 8% des participants développaient une séparation superficielle de la plaie et 8 % des participants développaient une séparation plus profonde de couches, ceci dans les deux groupes, mais il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'une différence d'incidence entre le groupe de fermeture sous-cutanée et le groupe sans fermeture sous-cutanée. Il n'y avait aucune preuve probante d'une différence dans la durée d'hospitalisation entre les groupes. Nous ne savons pas si ces résultats indiquent qu'il n’existe réellement aucune différence entre la fermeture sous-cutanée et l'absence de fermeture sous-cutanée, ou que des problèmes de plan d’étude rendent difficiles à identifier une réelle différence entre les deux techniques. Des effets bénéfiques ou délétères significatifs de fermeture sous-cutanée ne peuvent donc pas être exclus. De plus, aucun essai n'a évalué l'impact de la fermeture sous-cutanée sur la qualité de vie, les résultats des patients à long terme (les périodes de suivi des essais variaient entre une semaine et deux mois après l'opération) ou les implications financières pour les prestataires de santé. Il n'existe actuellement aucune preuve permettant d'étayer ou de réfuter la fermeture sous-cutanée après une chirurgie autre que la césarienne. D'autres essais bien conçus sont nécessaires.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th June, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé