Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Antibiotic therapy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in non surgical wounds

  1. Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy1,*,
  2. Rahul Koti1,
  3. Clare D Toon2,
  4. Peter Wilson3,
  5. Brian R Davidson1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Wounds Group

Published Online: 18 NOV 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 13 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010427.pub2


How to Cite

Gurusamy KS, Koti R, Toon CD, Wilson P, Davidson BR. Antibiotic therapy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in non surgical wounds. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD010427. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010427.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Department of Surgery, London, UK

  2. 2

    West Sussex County Council, Public Health, Chichester, West Sussex, UK

  3. 3

    University College London Hospitals, Department of Microbiology & Virology, London, UK

*Kurinchi Selvan Gurusamy, Department of Surgery, Royal Free Campus, UCL Medical School, Royal Free Hospital,, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 2PF, UK. kurinchi2k@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 18 NOV 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Non surgical wounds include chronic ulcers (pressure or decubitus ulcers, venous ulcers, diabetic ulcers, ischaemic ulcers), burns and traumatic wounds. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonisation (i.e. presence of MRSA in the absence of clinical features of infection such as redness or pus discharge) or infection in chronic ulcers varies between 7% and 30%. MRSA colonisation or infection of non surgical wounds can result in MRSA bacteraemia (infection of the blood) which is associated with a 30-day mortality of about 28% to 38% and a one-year mortality of about 55%. People with non surgical wounds colonised or infected with MRSA may be reservoirs of MRSA, so it is important to treat them, however, we do not know the optimal antibiotic regimen to use in these cases.

Objectives

To compare the benefits (such as decreased mortality and improved quality of life) and harms (such as adverse events related to antibiotic use) of all antibiotic treatments in people with non surgical wounds with established colonisation or infection caused by MRSA.

Search methods

We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 13 March 2013); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (2013, Issue 2); NHS Economic Evaluation Database (2013, Issue 2); Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to February Week 4 2013); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, March 12, 2013); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 2013 Week 10); EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 8 March 2013).

Selection criteria

We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotic treatment with no antibiotic treatment or with another antibiotic regimen for the treatment of MRSA-infected non surgical wounds. We included all relevant RCTs in the analysis, irrespective of language, publication status, publication year, or sample size.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently identified the trials, and extracted data from the trial reports. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for comparing the binary outcomes between the groups and planned to calculate the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI for comparing the continuous outcomes. We planned to perform the meta-analysis using both fixed-effect and random-effects models. We performed intention-to-treat analysis whenever possible.

Main results

We identified three trials that met the inclusion criteria for this review. In these, a total of 47 people with MRSA-positive diabetic foot infections were randomised to six different antibiotic regimens. While these trials included 925 people with multiple pathogens, they reported the information on outcomes for people with MRSA infections separately (MRSA prevalence: 5.1%). The only outcome reported for people with MRSA infection in these trials was the eradication of MRSA. The three trials did not report the review's primary outcomes (death and quality of life) and secondary outcomes (length of hospital stay, use of healthcare resources and time to complete wound healing). Two trials reported serious adverse events in people with infection due to any type of bacteria (i.e. not just MRSA infections), so the proportion of patients with serious adverse events was not available for MRSA-infected wounds. Overall, MRSA was eradicated in 31/47 (66%) of the people included in the three trials, but there were no significant differences in the proportion of people in whom MRSA was eradicated in any of the comparisons, as shown below.

1. Daptomycin compared with vancomycin or semisynthetic penicillin: RR of MRSA eradication 1.13; 95% CI 0.56 to 2.25 (14 people).
2. Ertapenem compared with piperacillin/tazobactam: RR of MRSA eradication 0.71; 95% CI 0.06 to 9.10 (10 people).
3. Moxifloxacin compared with piperacillin/tazobactam followed by amoxycillin/clavulanate: RR of MRSA eradication 0.87; 95% CI 0.56 to 1.36 (23 people).

Authors' conclusions

We found no trials comparing the use of antibiotics with no antibiotic for treating MRSA-colonised non-surgical wounds and therefore can draw no conclusions for this population. In the trials that compared different antibiotics for treating MRSA-infected non surgical wounds, there was no evidence that any one antibiotic was better than the others. Further well-designed RCTs are necessary.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antibiotic therapy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-infected or colonised non surgical wounds

Non surgical wounds include chronic skin ulcers (such as pressure sores or diabetic ulcers), burns and traumatic wounds. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be present in 7% to 30% of such wounds, and the MRSA may spread into the bloodstream, causing a life-threatening illness. A proportion of the wounds in which MRSA was present show signs of infection such as redness, pain, and pus discharge. The presence of MRSA without infection is called colonisation. It is not clear whether antibiotics should be used in MRSA colonised non-surgical wounds. The antibiotic that has to be used in MRSA-infected wounds is also not clear. We tried to find this out by performing a thorough search of the medical literature for studies that compared different antibiotic treatments for MRSA-infected or MRSA-colonised non surgical wounds. We included only randomised controlled trials, as, if they are conducted properly, they provide the best information. We included all relevant randomised controlled trials irrespective of the language in which the study was reported, the year of publication, and the number of people included in them. Two review authors independently identified the trials and extracted the relevant information in order to decrease the chance of an error occurring during this process.

We identified three trials that provided some information on this topic. A total of 47 people with MRSA-infected diabetic foot infections were randomised to six different antibiotic treatments (choice of treatment determined by a method similar to coin tossing). The only outcome reported was the eradication of MRSA. The trials reported none of the other outcomes that are important for patients and healthcare funders, such as death, quality of life, length of hospital stay, use of healthcare resources and time to complete wound healing. Each trial compared different antibiotics, and in each comparison there was no difference in the effectiveness of the antibiotics in eradicating MRSA. The three trials were very small and had a number of design faults, so it is still not possible to say which antibiotic is the most effective in eradicating MRSA from non-surgical wounds. Because there were no trials at all comparing the use of antibiotics with no antibiotic we do not know whether using antibiotics at all makes a difference for people with MRSA-colonised non-surgical wounds. Further well-designed randomised controlled trials are necessary to determine the best treatment for non surgical wounds containing or infected with MRSA.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'antibiothérapie pour le traitement du staphylocoque aureus résistant à la méthicilline (SARM) pour les plaies non-chirurgicales

Contexte

Les plaies non-chirurgicales comprennent les ulcères chroniques (escarres de pression ou de décubitus, les ulcères veineux, les ulcères diabétiques, les ulcères ischémiques), les brûlures et les plaies traumatiques. La prévalence de la colonisation du staphylocoque aureus résistant à la méthicilline (SARM) (présence du SARM en l'absence de caractéristiques cliniques de l'infection, telles que des rougeurs ou un écoulement de pus) ou l’infection des ulcères chroniques varie entre 7% et 30%. La colonisation ou l’infection du SARM dans les plaies non chirurgicales peut entraîner une bactériémie du SARM (infection du sang) qui est associée à une mortalité à 30 jours d'environ 28% à 38% et à une mortalité à un an d’environ 55%. Les plaies non-chirurgicales colonisées ou infectées par le SARM peuvent devenir un réservoir pour le SARM, il est donc important de les traiter, cependant et dans ce cas, nous ne connaissons pas le traitement antibiotique optimal à utiliser.

Objectifs

Comparer les bénéfices (tels qu'une réduction de la mortalité et une meilleure qualité de vie) et les inconvénients (tels que les effets indésirables liés à l'utilisation d'antibiotiques) de tous les traitements antibiotiques chez les patients souffrant de plaies non-chirurgicales présentant une colonisation ou une infection causée par le SARM.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes : le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les plaies et contusions (recherche effectuée le 13 mars 2013); le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (numéro 2); la base de données des extraits des revues sur les effets (2013, numéro 2); la base de données d’évaluation économique du NHS (2013, numéro 2); Ovid MEDLINE (de 1946 à la 4ème semaine de février 2013); Ovid MEDLINE (en cours de processus; autres citations non-indexées, 12 mars 2013); OvidEMBASE (de 1974 à la semaine 10 de 2013); EBSCO CINAHL (de 1982 au 8 mars 2013).

Critères de sélection

Nous avons uniquement inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant le traitement antibiotique à l'absence de traitement antibiotique ou à un autre schéma posologique d'antibiotiques pour le traitement des plaies non-chirurgicales infectées par le SMAR. Nous avons inclus tous les ECR pertinents dans l'analyse, sans restriction de langue, de statut de publication, d’année de publication ou de taille des échantillons.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont identifié les essais et extrait les données des rapports d'essais. Nous avons calculé le risque relatif (RR) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95% pour comparer les résultats binaires entre les groupes et avions prévu de calculer la différence moyenne (DM) avec IC à 95% pour comparer les résultats continus. Nous avions prévu de procéder à la méta-analyse à l'aide de modèles à effets fixes et aléatoires. Nous avons effectué une analyse en intention de traiter lorsque cela était possible.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons identifié trois essais qui répondaient aux critères d'inclusion pour cette revue. Dans ces essais, 47 personnes souffrant d'infection du pied diabétique et infectés par le SARM ont été randomisés pour six différents traitements antibiotiques. Alors que ces essais incluaient 925 patients atteints de plusieurs agents pathogènes, ils ont rapporté séparément les critères de jugement chez les patients présentant des infections par le SARM (prévalence du SARM : 5,1%). Le seul critère de jugement rapporté dans ces essais chez les patients atteints d'infection par le SARM était l'éradication du SARM. Les trois essais n'ont rendu compte ni des critères de jugement principaux de la revue (mortalité et qualité de vie), ni des critères de jugement secondaires (durée d'hospitalisation, utilisation des ressources de santé et délai avant la cicatrisation complète des plaies). Deux essais rapportaient des effets indésirables graves chez les patients atteints de l'infection en raison de tout type de bactérie (pas uniquement des infections par le SARM), de sorte que la proportion de patients souffrant d’effets indésirables graves n'était pas disponible pour les plaies infectées par le SARM. Dans l'ensemble, le SARM était éradiqué chez 31/47 (66%) des patients inclus dans les trois essais, mais il n'y avait aucune différence significative dans la proportion de patients dont le SARM était éradiqué, ceci dans aucune des comparaisons comme indiquées ci-dessous.

1. La daptomycine par rapport à la vancomycine ou à la pénicilline semi-synthétique: RR de l’éradication du SARM de 1,13; IC à 95% de 0,56 à 2,25 (14 participants).
2. L’ertapénème par rapport à la combinaison pipéracilline/tazobactam: RR de l’éradication du SARM 0,71; IC à 95% de 0,06 à 9,10 (10 participants).
3. La moxifloxacine par rapport au chlorhydrate suivi d'une combinaison pipéracilline/tazobactam suivi d’amoxicilline/clavulanate: RR de l’éradication du SARM de 0,87; IC à 95% de 0,56 à 1,36 (23 personnes).

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous n'avons trouvé aucun essai comparant l'utilisation d'antibiotiques à l'absence d'antibiotique pour le traitement des plaies non-chirurgicales colonisées par le SARM. Par conséquent, nous ne pouvons émettre de conclusion pour cette population. Dans les essais qui comparaient différents antibiotiques pour le traitement le traitement des plaies non-chirurgicales infectées par le SARM, il n'y avait pas de preuve indiquant qu'un antibiotique était plus efficace qu’un autre. D’autres ECR bien conçus sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'antibiothérapie pour le traitement du staphylocoque aureus résistant à la méthicilline (SARM) pour les plaies non-chirurgicales

L'antibiothérapie pour le traitement du staphylocoque aureus résistant à la méthicilline (SARM) pour les plaies non-chirurgicales infectées ou colonisées

Les plaies non-chirurgicales comprennent les ulcères cutanés chroniques (tels que les escarres ou les ulcères diabétiques), les brûlures et les plaies traumatiques. Le staphylocoque aureus résistant à la méthicilline (SARM) peut être présent chez 7% à 30% de ces plaies et peut se propager dans le courant sanguin, entraînant une maladie menaçant le pronostic vital. Une proportion des plaies dans lesquelles le SARM était présent présentait des signes d'infection, tels que de la rougeur, de la douleur et un écoulement de pus. La présence de SARM sans infection est connue sous le nom de colonisation. Il n'est pas clair si les antibiotiques devraient être utilisés pour les plaies non-chirurgicales lors de SARM colonisé. L'antibiotique qui doit être utilisé dans les plaies infectées de SARM n’est également pas clair. Nous avons essayé d’y répondre en réalisant une recherche exhaustive dans la littérature médicale des études ayant comparé différents traitements antibiotiques pour les plaies non-chirurgicales infectées ou colonisées par le SARM. Nous avons uniquement inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés, car s’ils sont menés correctement, ils fournissent les meilleures informations. Nous avons inclus tous les essais contrôlés randomisés pertinents, sans restriction de langue, d'année de publication et du nombre de patients inclus. Deux auteurs de la revue ont identifié les essais et extrait les informations pertinentes afin de réduire le risque d'erreur survenant au cours de ce processus.

Nous avons identifié trois essais qui ont fourni des informations sur ce sujet. Un total de 47 patients souffrant d'infection du pied diabétique et infecté par le SARM a été randomisé pour six différents traitements antibiotiques (choix du traitement déterminé par une méthode similaire tiré à pile ou face). Le seul critère de jugement rapporté était l'éradication du SARM. Les essais n’ont rapporté aucun des autres critères de jugement qui sont importants pour les patients et les bailleurs de fonds en soin de santé, tels que les décès, la qualité de vie, la durée du séjour à l'hôpital, l'utilisation des ressources de santé et le temps de cicatrisation complète des plaies. Chaque essai a comparé différents antibiotiques, et dans chaque comparaison, il n'y avait aucune différence dans l'efficacité des antibiotiques pour l'éradication du SARM. Les trois essais étaient de très petite taille et présentaient un certain nombre de défauts de conception, il n'est donc pas encore possible de déterminer quel antibiotique est le plus efficace pour éradiquer le SARM des plaies non-chirurgicales. Du fait qu’aucun essai ne comparait l'utilisation d'antibiotiques à l'absence d'antibiotique, nous ne savons pas si l'utilisation d'antibiotiques apporte une différence chez les patients souffrant de plaies non-chirurgicales colonisées par le SARM. D’autres essais contrôlés randomisés bien conçus sont nécessaires pour déterminer le meilleur traitement pour les plaies non-chirurgicales contenant ou infectées par le SARM.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st November, 2013
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé