Intervention Review

Exenterative surgery for recurrent gynaecological malignancies

  1. Christine Ang1,*,
  2. Andrew Bryant2,
  3. Desmond PJ Barton3,
  4. Christophe Pomel4,
  5. Raj Naik1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group

Published Online: 4 FEB 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 26 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010449.pub2

How to Cite

Ang C, Bryant A, Barton DPJ, Pomel C, Naik R. Exenterative surgery for recurrent gynaecological malignancies. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD010449. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010449.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Northern Gynaecological Oncology Centre, Gateshead, UK

  2. 2

    Newcastle University, Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

  3. 3

    Royal Marsden Hospital, Division of Gynaecological Oncology, London, UK

  4. 4

    Jean Perrin Comprehensive Cancer Centre of Auvergne, Surgical Oncology, Clermont-Ferrand, France

*Christine Ang, Northern Gynaecological Oncology Centre, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Sheriff Hill, Gateshead, NE9 6SX, UK. c.ang@which.net. christine.ang@ghnt.nhs.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 4 FEB 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary

Background

Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Gynaecological cancers (i.e. cancers affecting the ovaries, uterus, cervix, vulva and vagina) are among the most common cancers in women. Unfortunately, given the nature of the disease, cancer can recur or progress in some patients. Although the management of early-stage cancers is relatively straightforward, with lower associated morbidity and mortality, the surgical management of advanced and recurrent cancers (including persistent or progressive cancers) is significantly more complicated, often requiring very extensive procedures. Pelvic exenterative surgery involves removal of some or all of the pelvic organs. Exenterative surgery for persistent or recurrent cancer after initial treatment is difficult and is usually associated with significant perioperative morbidity and mortality. However, it provides women with a chance of cure that otherwise may not be possible. In carefully selected patients, it may also have a place in palliation of symptoms. The biology of recurrent ovarian cancer differs from that of other gynaecological cancers; it is often responsive to chemotherapy and is not included in this review.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of exenterative surgery versus other treatment modalities for women with recurrent gynaecological cancer, excluding recurrent ovarian cancer (this is covered in a separate review).

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to February 2013. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of clinical guidelines and review articles and contacted experts in the field.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or non-randomised studies with concurrent comparison groups that included multivariate analyses of exenterative surgery versus medical management in women with recurrent gynaecological malignancies.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed whether potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria. No studies were found; therefore no data were analysed.

Main results

The search strategy identified 1311 unique references, of which seven were retrieved in full, as they appeared to be potentially relevant on the basis of title and abstract. However, all were excluded, as they did not meet the inclusion criteria of the review.

Authors' conclusions

We found no evidence to inform decisions about exenterative surgery for women with recurrent cervical, endometrial, vaginal or vulvar malignancies. Ideally, a large RCT or, at the very least, well-designed non-randomised studies that use multivariate analysis to adjust for baseline imbalances are needed to compare exenterative surgery versus medical management, including palliative care.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary

Comparison of exenterative surgery versus medical management for women with recurrent gynaecological malignancies

Background

Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Gynaecological cancers (i.e. cancers affecting the ovaries, uterus, cervix, vulva and vagina) are among the most common cancers in women, with a higher incidence in developing countries. Globally, a woman's risk of developing cancer of the cervix, ovaries or uterus by the age of 65 is 2.2%; cancers of the vulva and vagina are less common. The biology of recurrent ovarian cancer differs from that of other gynaecological cancers; it is often responsive to chemotherapy and is not included in this review.

Review question

Unfortunately, in some women with gynaecological cancer, the disease will return (recur) or progress after initial treatment. Cancer recurrence is defined as the return of cancer after treatment and after a period during which the cancer is undetectable. Although the surgical management of early cancers is relatively straightforward, with lower associated morbidity and mortality, the surgical management of advanced and recurrent cancer is significantly more complicated, often requiring very extensive operations. Pelvic exenterative surgery involves removal of some or all of the pelvic organs, including lower bowel (rectum with or without the sigmoid colon and sometimes the anal canal), bladder, reproductive organs (including womb, fallopian tubes, ovaries, vagina and vulva), pelvic peritoneum (the membrane that lines the pelvis and pelvic organs) and sometimes the perineum (external area around the vagina and anus), with reconstruction. The intent of exenterative surgery should be resection of all tumour with clear histological margins with the aim of cure. It is radical, often mutilating, surgery that is associated with significant postoperative side effects (morbidity) and risk of death (mortality), and it is a major undertaking for both patient and surgeon. However, it may be the only potentially curative treatment option for women with recurrent cancer. 

Quality of the evidence

Although two review authors independently checked 1311 articles identified by searching, we found no relevant studies that were suitable for inclusion in the review. Therefore, no evidence is currently available from which to determine whether exenterative surgery is better than, equivalent to or worse than non-surgical treatment in terms of prolonged survival, treatment-related complications and impact on quality of life. This review highlights the need for good-quality studies comparing exenterative surgery versus non-surgical treatment in women with recurrent gynaecological cancer.