Intervention Review

Pelvic floor muscle training added to another active treatment versus the same active treatment alone for urinary incontinence in women

  1. Reuben Olugbenga Ayeleke1,
  2. E. Jean C Hay-Smith2,*,
  3. Muhammad Imran Omar1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Incontinence Group

Published Online: 20 NOV 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 28 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010551.pub2


How to Cite

Ayeleke RO, Hay-Smith EJC, Omar MI. Pelvic floor muscle training added to another active treatment versus the same active treatment alone for urinary incontinence in women. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD010551. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010551.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Aberdeen, Academic Urology Unit, Aberdeen, UK

  2. 2

    University of Otago, Rehabilitation Teaching and Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Wellington, New Zealand

*E. Jean C Hay-Smith, Rehabilitation Teaching and Research Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand. jean.hay-smith@otago.ac.nz.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 20 NOV 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is a first-line conservative treatment for urinary incontinence in women. Other active treatments include: physical therapies (e.g. vaginal cones); behavioural therapies (e.g. bladder training); electrical or magnetic stimulation; mechanical devices (e.g. continence pessaries); drug therapies (e.g. anticholinergics (solifenacin, oxybutynin, etc.) and duloxetine); and surgical interventions including sling procedures and colposuspension. This systematic review evaluated the effects of adding PFMT to any other active treatment for urinary incontinence in women

Objectives

To compare the effects of pelvic floor muscle training combined with another active treatment versus the same active treatment alone in the management of women with urinary incontinence.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register, which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, MEDLINE in process, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings (searched 28 February 2013), EMBASE (January 1947 to 2013 Week 9), CINAHL (January 1982 to 5 March 2013), ClinicalTrials.gov (searched 30 May 2013), WHO ICTRP (searched 3 June 2013) and the reference lists of relevant articles.

Selection criteria

We included randomised or quasi-randomised trials with two or more arms in women with clinical or urodynamic evidence of stress urinary incontinence, urgency urinary incontinence or mixed urinary incontinence. One arm of the trial included PFMT added to another active treatment; the other arm included the same active treatment alone.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed trials for eligibility and methodological quality and resolved any disagreement by discussion or consultation with a third party. We extracted and processed data in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Other potential sources of bias we incorporated into the 'Risk of bias' tables were ethical approval, conflict of interest and funding source.

Main results

Eleven trials met the eligibility criteria for inclusion, comprising women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) or mixed urinary incontinence (MUI), and they compared PFMT added to another active treatment (494 women) with the same active treatment alone (490 women). The pre-specified comparisons were reported by single trials except electrical stimulation which was reported by two trials. However, the two trials reporting electrical stimulation could not be pooled as one of the trials did not report any relevant data. We considered the included trials to be at unclear risk of bias for most of the domains, predominantly due to the lack of adequate information in a number of trials. This affected our rating of the quality of evidence. 

The majority of the trials did not report the primary outcomes specified in the review (cure/improvement, quality of life) or measured the outcomes in different ways. Effect estimates from small, single trials across a number of comparisons were indeterminate for key outcomes relating to symptoms and we rated the quality of evidence, using the GRADE approach, as either low or very low. There was moderate-quality evidence from a single trial investigating women with SUI, UUI or MUI that a higher proportion of women who received a combination of PFMT and heat and steam generating sheet reported cure compared to those who received the sheet alone: 19/37 (51%) versus 8/37 (22%) with a risk ratio (RR) of 2.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19 to 4.73). More women reported cure or improvement of incontinence in another trial comparing PFMT added to vaginal cones to vaginal cones alone: 14/15 (93%) versus 14/19 (75%), but this was not statistically significant (RR 1.27, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.71). We judged the quality of the evidence to be very low. Only one trial evaluating PFMT when added to drug therapy provided information about adverse events (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.60; very low-quality evidence).

With regard to condition-specific quality of life, there were no statistically significant differences between women (with SUI, UUI or MUI) who received PFMT added to bladder training and those who received bladder training alone at three months after treatment either on the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-Revised scale (mean difference (MD) -5.90, 95% CI -35.53 to 23.73) or on the Urogenital Distress Inventory scale (MD -18.90, 95% CI -37.92 to 0.12). A similar pattern of results was observed between women with SUI who received PFMT plus either a continence pessary or duloxetine and those who received the continence pessary or duloxetine alone. In all these comparisons, the quality of the evidence for the reported critical outcomes ranged from moderate to very low.

Authors' conclusions

This systematic review found insufficient evidence to state whether or not there were additional effects of adding PFMT to other active treatment when compared with the same active treatment alone for urinary incontinence (SUI, UUI or MUI) in women. These results should be interpreted with caution as most of the comparisons were investigated in small, single trials. None of the trials in this review were large enough to provide reliable evidence. Also, none of the included trials reported data on adverse events associated with the PFMT regimen, thereby making it very difficult to evaluate the safety of PFMT.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Pelvic floor muscle training added to another active treatment versus the same active treatment alone for urinary incontinence in women

Involuntary leakage of urine (urinary incontinence) affects women of all ages, particularly older women who live in residential care such as nursing homes. Some women leak urine during exercise or when they cough or sneeze (stress urinary incontinence) and this may occur as a result of weakness of the pelvic floor muscles such as damage during childbirth. Other women leak urine before going to the toilet when there is a sudden and compelling need to pass urine (urgency urinary incontinence) and this may be caused by involuntary contraction of the bladder muscle. Mixed urinary incontinence is the combination of both stress and urgency urinary incontinence. Pelvic floor muscle training is a supervised treatment and it involves muscle-clenching exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. It is a common treatment used by women to stop urine leakage. Other treatments are also available which can either be used alone or in combination with pelvic floor muscle training.

In this review, the combination of pelvic floor muscle training with another active treatment was compared with the same active treatment alone for the treatment of all types of urine leakage. There was not enough evidence say whether or not the addition of pelvic floor muscle training to another active treatment results in more benefits when compared to the same active treatment alone. There was also insufficient evidence to evaluate the adverse events associated with the addition of PFMT to other active treatment.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Entraînement des muscles du plancher pelvien ajouté à un autre traitement actif par rapport au même traitement actif seul pour l'incontinence urinaire chez la femme

Contexte

L’entraînement des muscles du plancher pelvien (EMPP) est un traitement conservateur de première ligne dans l'incontinence urinaire chez la femme. D'autres traitements actifs inclus : les thérapies physiques (telles que les cônes vaginaux), les thérapies comportementales (telles que la rééducation de la vessie), les stimulations électriques ou magnétiques, les dispositifs mécaniques (tels que les pessaires de continence), les traitements médicamenteux (tels que les anticholinergiques (la solifénacine, l'oxybutynine, etc.) et la duloxétine) et les interventions chirurgicales, y compris les procédures de fronde et la colposuspension. Cette revue systématique a évalué les effets de l'ajout de l’EMPP à tout autre traitement actif pour l'incontinence urinaire chez la femme

Objectifs

Comparer les effets de l'entraînement des muscles du plancher pelvien combinée à un autre traitement actif par rapport au même traitement actif seul dans la prise en charge des femmes souffrant d'incontinence urinaire.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur l'incontinence, qui contient des essais identifiés dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, processus en cours de MEDLINE et des recherches manuelles dans des journaux et actes de conférence (recherche du 28 février 2013), EMBASE (de janvier 1947 à la semaine 9 de 2013), CINAHL (de janvier 1982 au 5 mars 2013), ClinicalTrials.gov (recherche effectuée le 30 mai 2013), WHO ICTRP (recherche effectuée le 3 juin 2013) et les listes bibliographiques des articles pertinents.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais randomisés ou quasi-randomisés avec deux ou plusieurs groupes chez les femmes avec des preuves cliniques ou urodynamiques d'incontinence urinaire liée au stress, d'incontinence urinaire d'urgence ou d'incontinence urinaire mixte. Un groupe de l'essai inclus l’EMPP ajouté à un autre traitement actif; l'autre groupe inclus le même traitement actif seul.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont évalué l'éligibilité et la qualité méthodologique des essais et ont résolu les désaccords par discussion ou consultation avec un tiers. Nous avons extrait et traité les données en conformité avec le guide d’examen systématique des interventions Cochrane. D'autres sources potentielles de biais que nous avons inclus dans l'évaluation du «risque de biais» étaient l'approbation éthique, le conflit d'intérêt et la source de financement.

Résultats Principaux

Onze essais remplissaient les critères d'éligibilité à l'inclusion, comprenant les femmes souffrant d'incontinence urinaire liée au stress (IUS), d'incontinence urinaire d’urgence (IUI) ou d'incontinence urinaire mixte (IUM) et ils comparaient l’EMPP ajouté à un autre traitement actif (494 femmes) avec le même traitement actif seul (490 femmes). Les comparaisons préalablement spécifiées ont été signalées par des essais uniques à l'exception de la stimulation électrique qui était rapportée dans deux essais. Cependant, les deux essais rendant compte de la stimulation électrique n'ont pas pu être combinés, l'un des essais n'ayant pas rapporté de données pertinentes. Les essais inclus étaient à risque de biais incertain pour la plupart des domaines, principalement en raison du manque d'information adéquate dans un certain nombre d'essais. Ce qui a affecté notre évaluation de la qualité des preuves. 

La majorité des essais ne rapportaient pas les principaux critères de jugement spécifiés dans la revue (guérison/amélioration, qualité de vie) ou ils mesuraient les critères de jugement de différentes manières. Les effets estimés, provenant d'essais uniques de petite taille à travers un certain nombre de comparaisons, n’ont pas été déterminants pour les critères de jugement principaux concernant les symptômes et nous avons noté la qualité des preuves, en utilisant l'approche GRADE, comme faible ou très faible. Il y avait des preuves de qualité moyenne issues d'un seul essai étudiant les femmes souffrant d'IUS, d’IUI, ou d’IUM, montrant qu' une proportion plus importante de femmes ayant reçu une combinaison d’EMPP et de fiches générant de la chaleur et de la vapeur rapportaient une guérison par rapport à celles qui recevaient les fiches seules : 19/37 (51%) versus 8/37 (22%) avec un risque relatif (RR) de 2,38, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% de 1,19 à 4,73). Davantage de femmes avaient rendu compte de guérison ou d'amélioration de l'incontinence dans un autre essai comparant l’EMPP utilisé en complément avec les cônes vaginaux avec les cônes vaginaux seuls : 14/15 (93%) versus 14/19 (75%), mais cela n'était pas statistiquement significatif (RR 1,27, IC à 95% de 0,94 à 1,71). Nous avons estimé que la qualité des preuves était très faible. Seul un essai évaluant l’EMPP ajouté à un traitement médicamenteux a fourni des informations concernant les effets indésirables (RR de 0,84, IC à 95% de 0,45 à 1,60; preuves de très faible qualité).

En ce qui concerne les conditions spécifiques de la qualité de vie, il n'y avait aucune différence statistiquement significative entre les femmes (avec l'IUS, l’IUI, ou l’IUM) ayant suivi un EMPP en complément de la rééducation de la vessie et celles ayant reçu la rééducation vésicale seule, ceci trois mois après le traitement, soit sur l’échelle révisée du questionnaire sur l’impact de l'incontinence (différence moyenne (DM) de -5,90, IC à 95% -de 35,53 à 23,73), soit sur l’échelle de l’inventaire sur la détresse urogénitale (DM -18.90, IC à 95% - de 37,92 à 0,12). Un résultat similaire était observé entre les femmes souffrant d'IUS et ayant suivi un EMPP associé au pessaire de continence ou à la duloxétine et celles ayant reçu uniquement le pessaire de continence ou la duloxétine. Dans l'ensemble de ces comparaisons, la qualité des preuves pour les critères de jugement variait de modérée à très faible.

Conclusions des auteurs

Cette revue systématique n'a pas trouvé suffisamment de preuves pour affirmer si oui ou non il y avait des effets en ajoutant l’EMPP à un autre traitement actif par rapport au même traitement actif seul pour l'incontinence urinaire (IUS, IUI, ou IUM) chez les femmes. Ces résultats doivent être interprétés avec prudence car la plupart des comparaisons ont été étudiées dans des essais uniques de petite taille. Aucun des essais dans cette revue n’était de taille suffisante pour fournir des preuves fiables. Par ailleurs, aucun des essais inclus n’a rapporté de données sur les effets indésirables associés à l’EMPP, ce qui rend la sécurité de l’EMPP très difficile à évaluer.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Entraînement des muscles du plancher pelvien ajouté à un autre traitement actif par rapport au même traitement actif seul pour l'incontinence urinaire chez la femme

Entraînement des muscles du plancher pelvien ajouté à un autre traitement actif par rapport au même traitement actif seul pour l'incontinence urinaire chez la femme

Les fuites involontaires d'urine (incontinence urinaire) affectent les femmes de tout âge, en particulier chez les femmes plus âgées vivant dans des institutions spécialisées telles que des maisons de retraite médicalisées. Certaines femmes souffrent d'incontinence urinaire pendant l'exercice ou lorsqu' elles toussent ou éternuent (l'incontinence urinaire liée au stress) et cela peut survenir en raison de la faiblesse des muscles du plancher pelvien, telle que des lésions pendant l'accouchement. D'autres femmes souffrent d'incontinence urinaire avant de se rendre aux toilettes, lorsqu'elles ont un besoin soudain d'uriner (incontinence urinaire d'urgence) et cela peut être causé par une contraction involontaire des muscles de la vessie. L'incontinence urinaire mixte est la combinaison des deux, l'incontinence urinaire liée au stress et d'urgence. L’entraînement des muscles du plancher pelvien (EMPP) est un traitement supervisé qui implique des exercices de contraction musculaire pour renforcer les muscles pelviens. Ce traitement est couramment utilisé chez les femmes pour arrêter les fuites urinaires. D'autres traitements sont également disponibles et peuvent être utilisés seuls ou en combinaison avec un entraînement des muscles pelviens.

Dans cette revue, la combinaison d'entraînement des muscles du plancher pelvien avec un autre traitement actif a été comparée au même traitement actif seul pour le traitement de tous les types de fuites urinaires. Il n'y avait pas suffisamment de preuves pour déterminer si oui ou non l'ajout d'entraînement des muscles du plancher pelvien à un autre traitement actif apportait plus de bénéfices par rapport au même traitement actif seul. Les preuves étaient également insuffisantes pour comparer les effets indésirables associés à l'ajout de la formation PFMT par rapport à un autre traitement actif.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st November, 2013
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé