Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Behavioral interventions for improving condom use for dual protection

  1. Laureen M Lopez1,*,
  2. Conrad Otterness2,
  3. Mario Chen3,
  4. Markus Steiner1,
  5. Maria F Gallo4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Fertility Regulation Group

Published Online: 26 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 2 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010662.pub2


How to Cite

Lopez LM, Otterness C, Chen M, Steiner M, Gallo MF. Behavioral interventions for improving condom use for dual protection. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD010662. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010662.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    FHI 360, Clinical Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA

  2. 2

    Global Health Access Program, Mae Sot, Tak, Thailand

  3. 3

    FHI 360, Division of Biostatistics, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA

  4. 4

    The Ohio State University, Division of Epidemiology, Columbus, Ohio, USA

*Laureen M Lopez, Clinical Sciences, FHI 360, P.O. Box 13950, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA. llopez@fhi360.org.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 26 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Unprotected sex is a major risk factor for disease, disability, and mortality in many areas of the world due to the prevalence and incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STI) including HIV. The male condom is one of the oldest contraceptive methods and the earliest method for preventing the spread of HIV. When used correctly and consistently, condoms can provide dual protection, i.e., against both pregnancy and HIV/STI.

Objectives

We examined comparative studies of behavioral interventions for improving condom use. We were interested in identifying interventions associated with effective condom use as measured with biological assessments, which can provide objective evidence of protection.

Search methods

Through September 2013, we searched computerized databases for comparative studies of behavioral interventions for improving condom use: MEDLINE, POPLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE, LILACS, OpenGrey, COPAC, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP. We wrote to investigators for missing data.

Selection criteria

Studies could be either randomized or nonrandomized. They examined a behavioral intervention for improving condom use. The comparison could be another behavioral intervention, usual care, or no intervention. The experimental intervention had an educational or counseling component to encourage or improve condom use. It addressed preventing pregnancy as well as the transmission of HIV/STI. The focus could be on male or female condoms and targeted to individuals, couples, or communities. Potential participants included heterosexual women and heterosexual men.

Studies had to provide data from test results or records on a biological outcome: pregnancy, HIV/STI, or presence of semen as assessed with a biological marker, e.g., prostate-specific antigen. We did not include self-reported data on protected or unprotected sex, due to the limitations of recall and social desirability bias. Outcomes were measured at least three months after the behavioral intervention started.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors evaluated abstracts for eligibility and extracted data from included studies. For the dichotomous outcomes, the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (OR) with 95% CI was calculated using a fixed-effect model. Cluster randomized trials used various methods of accounting for the clustering, such as multilevel modeling. Most reports did not provide information to calculate the effective sample size. Therefore, we presented the results as reported by the investigators. No meta-analysis was conducted due to differences in interventions and outcome measures.

Main results

Seven studies met our eligibility criteria. All were randomized controlled trials; six assigned clusters and one randomized individuals. Sample sizes for the cluster-randomized trials ranged from 2157 to 15,614; the number of clusters ranged from 18 to 70. Four trials took place in African countries, two in the USA, and one in England. Three were based mainly in schools, two were in community settings, one took place during military training, and one was clinic-based.

Five studies provided data on pregnancy, either from pregnancy tests or national records of abortions and live births. Four trials assessed the incidence or prevalence of HIV and HSV-2. Three trials examined other STI. The trials showed or reported no significant difference between study groups for pregnancy or HIV, but favorable effects were evident for some STI. Two showed a lower incidence of HSV-2 for the behavioral-intervention group compared to the usual-care group, with reported adjusted rate ratios (ARR) of 0.65 (95% CI 0.43 to 0.97) and 0.67 (95% CI 0.47 to 0.97), while HIV did not differ significantly. One also reported lower syphilis incidence and gonorrhea prevalence for the behavioral intervention plus STI management compared to the usual-care group. The reported ARR were 0.58 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.96) and 0.28 (95% CI 0.11 to 0.70), respectively. Another study reported a negative effect on gonorrhea for young women in the intervention group versus the control group (ARR 1.93; 95% CI 1.01 to 3.71). The difference occurred among those with only one year of the intervention.

Authors' conclusions

We found few studies and little clinical evidence of effectiveness for interventions promoting condom use for dual protection. We did not find favorable results for pregnancy or HIV, and only found some for other STI. The overall quality of evidence was moderate to low; losses to follow up were high. Effective interventions for improving condom use are needed to prevent pregnancy and HIV/STI transmission. Interventions should be feasible for resource-limited settings and tested using valid and reliable outcome measures.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Programs for preventing pregnancy and disease through better condom use

Unprotected sex can result in disease and death in many areas of the world, due to sexually transmitted infections (STI) including HIV. The male condom is one of the oldest birth control methods and the earliest method that works to prevent HIV. When used correctly, condoms can provide dual protection against pregnancy and HIV/STI. We examined behavioral programs to improve condom use.

Through September 2013, we did computer searches for studies of programs to improve condom use. We wrote to researchers for missing data. The studies could have various designs. The education program addressed preventing pregnancy and HIV/STI. The intervention was compared with a different program, usual care, or no intervention. The studies had a clinical outcome such as pregnancy, HIV, or STI tests. We did not use self-reports of condom use.

We found seven randomized trials. Six assigned groups (clusters) and one randomized individuals. Four trials took place in African countries, two in the USA, and one in England. The studies were based in schools, community settings, a clinic, and a military training setting.

Five trials examined pregnancy, four studied HIV and HSV-2 (herpes), and three assessed other STI. We found no major differences between study groups for pregnancy or HIV. Some results were seen for STI outcomes. Two studies showed fewer HSV-2 cases with the behavioral program compared to the control group. One also reported fewer cases of syphilis and gonorrhea with the behavioral program plus STI management. Another study reported a higher gonorrhea rate for the intervention group. The researchers believed the result was due to a subgroup that did not have the full program.

We found little clinical effect of improving condom use. The studies provided moderate to low quality information. Losses to follow up were high. We need good programs on condom use to prevent pregnancy and HIV/STI. Programs should be useful for settings with few resources. Interventions should be tested with valid outcome measures.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions comportementales destinées à améliorer l'utilisation de préservatifs pour une double protection

Contexte

Les rapports sexuels non protégés sont un facteur de risque majeur de maladies, invalidité et mortalité dans de nombreuses régions du monde en raison de la prévalence et l'incidence des maladies sexuellement transmissibles (MST), y compris le VIH. Le préservatif masculin est l'une des plus anciennes méthodes contraceptives et la méthode la plus ancienne pour prévenir la propagation du VIH. Dans le cas d'un usage correct, de manière constante, les préservatifs peuvent fournir une protection mixte, c’est à dire à la fois des grossesses et de VIH/MST.

Objectifs

Nous avons examiné les études comparatives des interventions comportementales pour améliorer l'utilisation de préservatifs. Nous étions intéressés par l'identification des interventions efficaces associées à l'utilisation de préservatifs mesurée par des évaluations biologiques, qui peuvent fournir des preuves objectives de protection.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Jusqu' à septembre 2013, nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données informatisées pour trouver des études comparatives des interventions comportementales pour améliorer l'utilisation de préservatifs: MEDLINE, POPLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE, LILACS, OpenGrey, COPAC, ClinicalTrials. gov et ICTRP. Nous avons écrit aux chercheurs pour obtenir des données manquantes.

Critères de sélection

Les études pouvaient être des essais randomisés ou non. Il s’agissait d’évaluer une intervention comportementale visant à améliorer l'utilisation de préservatifs. La comparaison pouvait être avec autre intervention comportementale, les soins habituels ou à l'absence d’intervention. Le groupe expérimental d’intervention avait une composante de conseil éducatif ou d’encouragement pour améliorer l'utilisation de préservatifs. Les études portaient sur la prévention des grossesses aussi bien que la transmission du VIH/MST. L'objectif pouvait être focalisé sur les préservatifs masculins ou féminins ou ciblés les individus, les couples, ou les communautés. Des participants potentiels étaient des femmes et des hommes hétérosexuels.

Les études devaient fournir les données de résultats d'examens ou des rapports sur un critère de jugement biologique: grossesse, VIH/MST, ou présence de sperme évaluée avec un marqueur biologique comme l’antigène prostatique spécifique. Nous n'avons pas inclus les données fournies par les intéressés concernant la protection lors des rapports, compte tenu des limitations de rappel et de biais souhaitées. Les critères de jugement étaient mesurés au moins trois mois après le début de l'intervention comportementale.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué l'éligibilité des résumés de manière indépendante et extrait les données issues des études incluses. Pour les résultats dichotomiques, le rapport de cotes de Mantel-Haenszel (RC) avec IC à 95% a été calculé en utilisant un modèle à effets fixes. Des essais randomisés en grappes utilisaient différentes méthodes de calcul pour les groupes d'individus come la modélisation à plusieurs niveaux. La plupart des rapports n'ont pas fourni d'informations pour calculer l'efficacité de la taille des grappes. Par conséquent, nous avons présenté les résultats rapportés par les investigateurs. Aucune méta-analyse n'a été effectuée en raison des différences dans les interventions et les mesures de résultats.

Résultats Principaux

Sept études remplissaient nos critères d'éligibilité. Toutes étaient des essais contrôlés randomisés; six assignaient des grappes et un des individus. Les tailles des partitions de donnés dans les essais randomisés allaient de 2 157 à 15,614; le nombre de grappes allait de 18 à 70. Quatre essais ont été réalisés dans des pays africains, deux aux États-Unis, et un en Angleterre. Trois étaient faits principalement dans des écoles, deux étaient en milieu communautaire, un se déroulait au cours d’une formation militaire et un dans une clinique.

Cinq études ont fourni des données sur la grossesse, soit à partir de tests de grossesse ou de registres nationaux d'avortements et de naissances vivantes. Quatre essais ont évalué l'incidence ou la prévalence du VIH et de HSV-2. Trois essais ont examiné les autres MST. Les essais n’ont montré ou rapporté aucune différence significative entre les groupes d'étude pour la grossesse ou le VIH, mais des effets favorables ont été mis en évidence pour certaines MST. Deux ont montré une incidence plus faible en HSV-2 pour le groupe d’intervention comportementale par rapport au groupe de soins habituels, avec un rapport d'effets absolus (RAR) de 0,65(IC à 95%, de 0,43 à 0,97) et 0,67 (IC à 95% 0,47 à 0,97), tandis que le VIH n'était pas significativement différent. Un essai a également rapporté une plus faible incidence de syphilis et de prévalence de gonorrhée pour le groupe d'intervention comportementale plus de la prise en charge des MST par rapport au groupe de soins habituels. Des RAR rapportés étaient 0,58 (IC à 95%, entre 0,35 et 0,96) et 0,28 (IC à 95%, de 0,11 à 0,70), respectivement. Une autre étude rapportait un effet négatif concernant la gonorrhée des jeunes femmes dans le groupe d'intervention versus le groupe témoin (RAR 1,93; IC de à 95% 1,01 à 3,71). La différence était observée parmi ces patientes avec seulement un an de l'intervention.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous avons trouvé peu d'études et peu de preuves d'efficacité clinique pour des interventions visant à promouvoir l'utilisation de préservatifs pour une double protection. Nous n'avons pas trouvé de résultats favorables pour la grossesse ou le VIH, et seulement quelques uns pour les autres MST. La qualité globale des preuves était de faible à modérée; les pertes de suivi étaient élevés. Des interventions efficaces pour améliorer l'utilisation de préservatifs sont nécessaires pour prévenir la grossesse et la transmission du VIH/MST. Ces interventions devraient être possibles pour les pays à ressources limitées et testées à l'aide de mesures de résultats valides et fiables.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions comportementales destinées à améliorer l'utilisation de préservatifs pour une double protection

Des programmes de contraception et de prévention de maladies au moyen d'une meilleure utilisation des préservatifs

Des rapports sexuels non protégés peuvent entraîner des maladies et décès en nombreuses régions du monde, en raison de maladies sexuellement transmissibles (MST), y compris le VIH. Le préservatif masculin est l'une des plus anciennes des méthodes de contraception et le premier moyen de prévention utilisé efficacement dans la prévention du VIH. En cas d'utilisation correcte, l’usage de préservatifs peut fournir une protection contre grossesse et VIH/MST. Nous avons examiné les programmes comportementaux visant à améliorer l'utilisation de préservatifs.

Jusqu' à septembre 2013, nous avons effectué des recherches informatisées pour trouver des études de programmes d’amélioration de l'utilisation de préservatifs. Nous avons écrit aux chercheurs pour obtenir des données manquantes. Les études pourraient avoir divers types de planification. Le programme de formation portait sur la prévention de la grossesse et du VIH/MST. L'intervention était comparée à un programme différent, aux soins habituels ou à l'absence d'intervention. Les études présentaient des critères de jugement clinique tels que la grossesse, le VIH, ou des tests des IST. Nous n'avons pas utilisé les auto-évaluations concernant l'utilisation du préservatif.

Nous avons trouvé sept essais randomisés. Six assignaient de petits groupes et un des individus. Quatre essais ont été réalisés dans des pays africains, deux aux États-Unis et un au Royaume Uni. Les études étaient faites dans des écoles, des milieux communautaires, une clinique, et une dans un contexte de formation militaire.

Cinq essais examinaient la grossesse, quatre avaient étudié le VIH et HSV-2 (herpès), et trois évaluaient les autres MST. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune différence majeure entre les groupes d'étude pour la grossesse ou le VIH. Certains résultats ont été observés pour les résultats des MST. Deux études ont montré une diminution des cas avec le programme comportemental par rapport au groupe témoin. Un essai a également rapporté moins de cas de syphilis et de gonorrhée avec le programme comportemental plus la prise en charge des MST. Une autre étude a rapporté un taux plus élevés de gonorrhée pour le groupe d'intervention. Les chercheurs pensent que le résultat était du à un sous-groupe qui n'avait pas eu le programme complet.

Nous avons trouvé très peu d'effet clinique d'amélioration pour l'usage de préservatifs. Les études ont fourni des informations de qualité faible à modérée. Les pertes de suivi étaient élevées. Nous avons besoin de programmes de bonne qualité sur l'utilisation de préservatifs pour la prévention des grossesses et VIH/MST. Les programmes devraient être utiles dans des conditions avec peu de ressources. Des interventions doivent être testées avec des mesures de résultats valides.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 9th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�