Pre-emptive correction for haemodialysis arteriovenous access stenosis

  • Protocol
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Pietro Ravani,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Calgary, Department of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    • Pietro Ravani, Department of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403 29th St NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 2T9, Canada. pravani@ucalgary.ca.

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  • Matthew T James,

    1. University of Calgary, Department of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Jennifer M MacRae,

    1. University of Calgary, Department of Medicine, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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  • Suetonia C Palmer,

    1. University of Otago Christchurch, Department of Medicine, Christchurch, New Zealand
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  • Robert R Quinn,

    1. University of Calgary, Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Calgary, AB, Canada
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  • Matthew J Oliver,

    1. University of Toronto, Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada
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  • Giovanni FM Strippoli

    1. The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Cochrane Renal Group, Centre for Kidney Research, Westmead, NSW, Australia
    2. University of Bari, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, Bari, Italy
    3. Mario Negri Sud Consortium, Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Epidemiology, Santa Maria Imbaro, Italy
    4. The University of Sydney, Sydney School of Public Health, Sydney, Australia
    5. Diaverum, Medical-Scientific Office, Lund, Sweden
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Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

  1. To evaluate whether pre-emptive correction of an AV access stenosis improves clinically relevant outcomes: 

    1. Vascular access outcomes: suitability for haemodialysis, risk of thrombosis, and overall patency rates and access survival (access loss)

    2. Patient-centred outcomes: hospitalisation rates, need for diagnostic or intervention procedures to maintain access patency; all-cause mortality, cause-specific mortality (cardiovascular or infection-related), fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction or stroke); and surrogate outcomes (measures of heart function and structure, of access flow, and of haemodialysis adequacy)

  2. To evaluate whether the effects of pre-emptive correction of an AV access stenosis differ by access type (fistula versus graft); and

  3. To evaluate whether other factors (dialysis vintage, access location, configuration or materials, algorithm for referral for intervention, intervention strategies (surgical versus radiological or other), or study design explain the heterogeneity that might exist in effect estimates.

  1. Vascular access outcomes: suitability for haemodialysis, risk of thrombosis, and overall patency rates and access survival (access loss)

  2. Patient-centred outcomes: hospitalisation rates, need for diagnostic or intervention procedures to maintain access patency; all-cause mortality, cause-specific mortality (cardiovascular or infection-related), fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction or stroke); and surrogate outcomes (measures of heart function and structure, of access flow, and of haemodialysis adequacy)

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