Surgical treatment of stage IA2 cervical cancer

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors


Abstract

Background

Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women up to 65 years of age and is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological cancers worldwide. Women with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IA2 cervical cancer have measured stromal invasion (when the cancer breaks through the basement membrane of the epithelium) of greater than 3 mm and no greater than 5 mm in depth with a horizontal surface extension of no more than 7 mm. For stage IA2 disease, radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy or radiotherapy is the standard treatment. In order to avoid complications of more radical surgical methods, less invasive options, such as simple hysterectomy, simple trachelectomy or conisation, with or without pelvic lymphadenectomy, may be feasible for stage IA2 disease, considering the relative low risk of local or distant metastatic disease. The evidence for less radical tumour excision and for the role of systematic lymphadenectomy in stage IA2 cervical cancer is not clear.

Objectives

To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of less radical surgery in stage IA2 cervical cancer.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group trials register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to September 2013. We also searched registers of clinical trials and abstracts of scientific meetings.

Selection criteria

We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared surgical techniques in women with stage IA2 cervical cancer.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed whether potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria. We found no trials and, therefore, no data were analysed.

Main results

The search strategy identified 982 unique references, which were all excluded on the basis of title and abstract because it was clear that they did not meet the inclusion criteria. We identified one relevant large ongoing trial, so it is anticipated that we will be able to add this evidence to this review in the future.

Authors' conclusions

We found no evidence to inform decisions about different surgical techniques in women with stage IA2 cervical cancer. In the future, the results of one large ongoing RCT should allow comparison of different types of surgery.

Résumé scientifique

Traitement chirurgical du cancer cervical de stade IA2

Contexte

Le cancer cervical est le deuxième cancer le plus fréquent chez les femmes jusqu'à l'âge de 65 ans et est la cause la plus fréquente de décès par cancer gynécologique dans le monde. Chez les femmes atteintes d'un cancer cervical de stade IA2 selon la classification de la Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO), l'invasion stromale (lorsque le cancer franchit la membrane basale de l'épithélium) mesurée est supérieure à 3 mm et inférieure à 5 mm en profondeur, avec une extension horizontale en surface de 7 mm au plus. Pour la pathologie de stade IA2, l'hystérectomie radicale avec une lymphadénectomie pelvienne ou une radiothérapie est le traitement standard. Afin d'éviter les complications des méthodes chirurgicales plus radicales, les options moins invasives, telles que l'hystérectomie simple, la trachélectomie simple ou la conisation, avec ou sans lymphadénectomie pelvienne, peuvent être pratiquées dans la pathologie de stade IA2, compte tenu du risque relativement faible de maladie métastatique locale ou distante. Les preuves ne sont pas claires pour l'excision moins radicale de la tumeur et pour le rôle de la lymphadénectomie systématique dans le cancer cervical de stade IA2.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et l'innocuité de chirurgies moins radicales dans le cancer cervical de stade IA2.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre d'essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur les cancers gynécologiques, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE et EMBASE jusqu'à septembre 2013. Nous avons également consulté les registres d'essais cliniques et les résumés de réunions scientifiques.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons recherché des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) comparant des techniques chirurgicales chez les femmes atteintes d'un cancer cervical de stade IA2.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué si les études potentiellement pertinentes remplissaient les critères d'inclusion. Nous n'avons pas trouvé d'essais et, par conséquent, aucune donnée n'a été analysée.

Résultats principaux

La stratégie de recherche documentaire a identifié 982 références uniques, qui ont toutes été exclues sur la base du titre et du résumé, car il était clair qu'elles ne répondaient pas aux critères d'inclusion. Nous avons identifié un essai pertinent à grande échelle, actuellement en cours, dont les preuves pourront être ajoutées dans cette revue dans l'avenir.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve permettant d'orienter les décisions concernant les différentes techniques chirurgicales chez les femmes atteintes d'un cancer cervical de stade IA2. Dans l'avenir, les résultats d'un grand ECR en cours devraient permettre la comparaison de différents types de chirurgie.

Plain language summary

Surgical treatment of stage IA2 cervical cancer

Background

Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women up to 65 years of age and is the most frequent cause of death from gynaecological cancers worldwide. Cervical cancer is staged (classified using a universally adopted system called International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging) according to how advanced the disease is and whether the cancer has spread beyond the cervix. Stage I cervical cancer is confined to the cervix. Stage I is divided into stage IA and IB. Stage IA is the earliest stage of cervical cancer where the cancer is so small it cannot be seen with the naked eye. Stage IA is subdivided further to stages IA1 and IA2. Stage IA2 means the cancer has grown between 3 and 5 mm into the cervical tissues, but it is still less than 7 mm wide.

It is well recognised that survival rates from the disease decrease as the stage at which the diagnosis is made increases. In women with stage IA2 cervical cancer it has been reported that between 95% and 98% survived five years after diagnosis with standard surgery.

For stage IA2 disease, surgery or radiotherapy have been the treatment of choice. Standard surgery is a radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. It involves the removal of the womb, the cervix, the upper part of the vagina and the tissues around the cervix (parametrial tissue), as well as the lymph nodes (glands) in the pelvis (pelvic lymphadenectomy). Although this type of surgery has excellent results, it can result in side effects, such as organ injury (bladder, bowel, blood vessel, nerve) and long-term side effects, such as sexual or bladder dysfunction, pelvic cyst formation and lymphoedema (swelling) of the legs. One main disadvantage of radical hysterectomy is that it leaves the woman incapable of bearing children. As cervical cancer is common in women aged 25 to 35 years, this is an important consideration for many women.

The alternative surgical treatment is a radical trachelectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. Radical trachelectomy involves removing the cervix, the upper part of the vagina and the parametrial tissue and the pelvic lymph glands, but retaining the body of the womb. This treatment is well established and appears to be safe and effective in preserving fertility and has a high chance of conception. Late miscarriage and premature labour are the most serious side effects in pregnancies where the woman has had a trachelectomy.

Methods

This review aimed to assess less invasive types of surgery such as simple hysterectomy, conisation (removal of the central cervical tissue) with or without pelvic lymphadenectomy for women with stage IA2 disease. We searched the literature from 1966 to September 2013. We then checked 982 titles and abstracts, but found no relevant completed clinical trials that met the inclusion criteria only one on-going trial.

Findings

We identified one large ongoing, multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT, a study in which women are allocated at random (by chance alone) to receive one of two treatments: standard versus less radical treatment) that looked at this subject. The results of this trial will be published in the future.

Currently there is absence of evidence that any form of surgical technique is better, equal or worse in prolonging survival, improving quality of life or are associated with fewer side effects. The review highlights the need to assess, once completed, the results of the ongoing RCT in order to compare different types of surgery.

Résumé simplifié

Traitement chirurgical du cancer du col de l'utérus de stade IA2

Contexte

Le cancer du col de l'utérus est le deuxième cancer le plus fréquent chez les femmes jusqu'à l'âge de 65 ans et est la cause la plus fréquente de décès par cancer gynécologique dans le monde. Le cancer du col est catégorisé (classé à l'aide d'un système universellement adopté, la classification de la Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique ou FIGO) en fonction du degré d'avancement de la maladie et selon que le cancer s'est propagé au-delà du col de l'utérus. Le cancer du col de stade I est confiné au col de l'utérus. Le stade I se divise en stades IA et IB. Le stade IA est le premier stade du cancer du col, où le cancer est tellement petit qu'il ne peut être observé à l'œil nu. Le stade IA est encore sous-divisé en stades IA1 et IA2. Le stade IA2 signifie que le cancer a pénétré de 3 mm à 5 mm dans les tissus du col, mais sa largeur est encore de moins de 7 mm.

Il est bien établi que les taux de survie de la maladie diminuent en même temps que le stade auquel le diagnostic est établi augmente. Chez les femmes atteintes d'un cancer du col de stade IA2, il a été rapporté qu'entre 95 % et 98 % avaient survécu à cinq ans après le diagnostic avec la chirurgie standard.

Pour la maladie de stade IA2, la chirurgie ou la radiothérapie ont été le traitement de choix. La chirurgie standard est une hystérectomie radicale avec une lymphadénectomie pelvienne bilatérale. Elle implique l'ablation de l'utérus, du col de l'utérus, de la partie supérieure du vagin et des tissus situés autour du col de l'utérus (tissu paramétrial), ainsi que des ganglions lymphatiques (glandes) dans le bassin (lymphadénectomie pelvienne). Bien que ce type de chirurgie ait d'excellents résultats, elle peut provoquer des effets secondaires, tels que des lésions d'organes (vessie, intestin, vaisseau sanguin, nerf) et des effets secondaires à long terme, tels qu'une dysfonction sexuelle ou de la vessie, la formation de kystes pelviens et un lymphœdème (gonflement) des jambes. Un inconvénient majeur de hystérectomie radicale est que la femme n'est plus en mesure après de porter des enfants. Le cancer cervical étant courant chez les femmes de 25 à 35 ans, il s'agit d'une considération importante pour de nombreuses femmes.

Le traitement chirurgical alternatif est une trachélectomie radicale avec une lymphadénectomie pelvienne bilatérale. La trachélectomie radicale consiste à enlever le col de l'utérus, la partie supérieure du vagin et le tissu paramétrial ainsi que les ganglions lymphatiques pelviens, mais en gardant le corps de l'utérus. Ce traitement est bien établi et semble être sûr et efficace pour préserver la fertilité, avec de grandes chances de conception. Une fausse couche tardive et un travail prématuré sont les plus graves effets secondaires dans les grossesses où la femme a subi une trachélectomie.

Méthodes

Cette revue visait à évaluer des types moins invasifs de chirurgie, tels que l'hystérectomie simple ou la conisation (ablation du tissu central du col de l'utérus) avec ou sans lymphadénectomie pelvienne chez des femmes atteintes de maladie de stade IA2. Nous avons effectué des recherches dans la littérature de 1966 à septembre 2013. Nous avons ensuite vérifié 982 titres et résumés, mais n'avons trouvé aucun essai clinique pertinent achevé remplissant les critères d'inclusion, seulement un essai en cours.

Résultats

Nous avons identifié un grand essai contrôlé randomisé multicentrique en cours (ECR, une étude dans laquelle les femmes sont assignées aléatoirement (uniquement par hasard) à recevoir un des deux traitements : traitement standard ou moins radical) qui examinait ce sujet. Les résultats de cet essai seront publiés dans l'avenir.

Il n'existe actuellement pas de preuves indiquant qu'un type de technique chirurgicale est plus efficace, égal ou moins efficace qu'un autre pour prolonger la survie ou améliorer la qualité de vie, ou est associé à moins d'effets secondaires. La revue met en évidence la nécessité d'évaluer, une fois achevé, les résultats de l'ECR en cours afin de comparer différents types de chirurgie.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 31st July, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé