Intervention Protocol

Portion, package or tableware size for changing selection and consumption of food, alcohol and tobacco

  1. Gareth J Hollands1,*,
  2. Ian Shemilt1,
  3. Theresa M Marteau1,
  4. Susan A Jebb2,
  5. Hannah B Lewis3,
  6. Yinghui Wei4,
  7. Julian PT Higgins5,
  8. David Ogilvie6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Public Health Group

Published Online: 1 APR 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 28 FEB 2014

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011045

How to Cite

Hollands GJ, Shemilt I, Marteau TM, Jebb SA, Lewis HB, Wei Y, Higgins JPT, Ogilvie D. Portion, package or tableware size for changing selection and consumption of food, alcohol and tobacco (Protocol). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD011045. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD011045.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Cambridge, Behaviour and Health Research Unit, Cambridge, UK

  2. 2

    University of Oxford, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK

  3. 3

    MRC Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge, UK

  4. 4

    University of Plymouth, School of Computing and Mathematics, Plymouth, UK

  5. 5

    University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol, UK

  6. 6

    University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, MRC Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, UK

*Gareth J Hollands, Behaviour and Health Research Unit, University of Cambridge, Forvie Site, Robinson Way, Cambridge, CB2 0SR, UK. gareth.hollands@medschl.cam.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 1 APR 2014

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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract

This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:

  1. To assess the effects of interventions that involve manipulation of and comparison of different sizes or sets of physical dimensions of a portion, package, individual unit or item of tableware on unregulated (ad libitum) selection or consumption of food, alcohol or tobacco products in adults and children.
  2. To assess the extent to which the effects of such interventions may be modified by:

a) study-level characteristics, such as target product type (food, alcohol, tobacco) and whether the target of the manipulation is a portion, package, individual unit or item of tableware;

b) intervention characteristics, such as magnitude of the difference in size; and

c) participant characteristics, such as age, gender and socioeconomic status.