Targeted mass media interventions promoting healthy behaviours to reduce risk of non-communicable diseases in adult, ethnic minorities

  • New
  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Annhild Mosdøl,

    Corresponding author
    1. Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Oslo, Norway
    • Annhild Mosdøl, Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO BOX 4404 Nydalen, Oslo, Norway. annhild.mosdol@fhi.no.

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ingeborg B Lidal,

    1. Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Oslo, Norway
    2. Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital, TRS National Resource Centre for Rare Disorders, Nesoddtangen, Norway
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gyri H Straumann,

    1. Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Oslo, Norway
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Gunn E Vist

    1. Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Prevention, Health Promotion and Organisation Unit, Oslo, Norway
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

Physical activity, a balanced diet, avoidance of tobacco exposure, and limited alcohol consumption may reduce morbidity and mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Mass media interventions are commonly used to encourage healthier behaviours in population groups. It is unclear whether targeted mass media interventions for ethnic minority groups are more or less effective in changing behaviours than those developed for the general population.

Objectives

To determine the effects of mass media interventions targeting adult ethnic minorities with messages about physical activity, dietary patterns, tobacco use or alcohol consumption to reduce the risk of NCDs.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ERIC, SweMed+, and ISI Web of Science until August 2016. We also searched for grey literature in OpenGrey, Grey Literature Report, Eldis, and two relevant websites until October 2016. The searches were not restricted by language.

Selection criteria

We searched for individual and cluster-randomised controlled trials, controlled before-and-after studies (CBA) and interrupted time series studies (ITS). Relevant interventions promoted healthier behaviours related to physical activity, dietary patterns, tobacco use or alcohol consumption; were disseminated via mass media channels; and targeted ethnic minority groups. The population of interest comprised adults (≥ 18 years) from ethnic minority groups in the focal countries. Primary outcomes included indicators of behavioural change, self-reported behavioural change and knowledge and attitudes towards change. Secondary outcomes were the use of health promotion services and costs related to the project.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently reviewed the references to identify studies for inclusion. We extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in all included studies. We did not pool the results due to heterogeneity in comparisons made, outcomes, and study designs. We describe the results narratively and present them in 'Summary of findings' tables. We judged the quality of the evidence using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) methodology.

Main results

Six studies met the inclusion criteria, including three RCTs, two cluster-RCTs and one ITS. All were conducted in the USA and comprised targeted mass media interventions for people of African descent (four studies), Spanish-language dominant Latino immigrants (one study), and Chinese immigrants (one study). The two latter studies offered the intervention in the participants’ first language (Spanish, Cantonese, or Mandarin). Three interventions targeted towards women only, one pregnant women specifically. We judged all studies as being at unclear risk of bias in at least one domain and three studies as being at high risk of bias in at least one domain.

We categorised the findings into three comparisons. The first comparison examined mass media interventions targeted at ethnic minorities versus an equivalent mass media intervention intended for the general population. The one study in this category (255 participants of African decent) found little or no difference in effect on self-reported behavioural change for smoking and only small differences in attitudes to change between participants who were given a culturally specific smoking cessation booklet versus a booklet intended for the general population. We are uncertain about the effect estimates, as assessed by the GRADE methodology (very low quality evidence of effect). No study provided data for indicators of behavioural change or adverse effects.

The second comparison assessed targeted mass media interventions versus no intervention. One study (154 participants of African decent) reported effects for our primary outcomes. Participants in the intervention group had access to 12 one-hour live programmes on cable TV and received print material over three months regarding nutrition and physical activity to improve health and weight control. Change in body mass index (BMI) was comparable between groups 12 months after the baseline (low quality evidence). Scores on a food habits (fat behaviours) and total leisure activity scores changed favourably for the intervention group (very low quality evidence). Two other studies exposed entire populations in geographical areas to radio advertisements targeted towards African American communities. Authors presented effects on two of our secondary outcomes, use of health promotion services and project costs. The campaign message was to call smoking quit lines. The outcome was the number of calls received. After one year, one study reported 18 calls per estimated 10,000 targeted smokers from the intervention communities (estimated target population 310,500 persons), compared to 0.2 calls per estimated 10,000 targeted smokers from the control communities (estimated target population 331,400 persons) (moderate quality evidence). The ITS study also reported an increase in the number of calls from the target population during campaigns (low quality evidence). The proportion of African American callers increased in both studies (low to very low quality evidence). No study provided data on knowledge and attitudes for change and adverse effects. Information on costs were sparse.

The third comparison assessed targeted mass media interventions versus a mass media intervention plus personalised content. Findings are based on three studies (1361 participants). Participants in these comparison groups received personal feedback. Two of the studies recorded weight changes over time. Neither found significant differences between the groups (low quality evidence). Evidence on behavioural changes, and knowledge and attitudes typically found some effects in favour of receiving personalised content or no significant differences between groups (very low quality evidence). No study provided data on adverse effects. Information on costs were sparse.

Authors' conclusions

The available evidence is inadequate for understanding whether mass media interventions targeted toward ethnic minority populations are more effective in changing health behaviours than mass media interventions intended for the population at large. When compared to no intervention, a targeted mass media intervention may increase the number of calls to smoking quit line, but the effect on health behaviours is unclear. These studies could not distinguish the impact of different components, for instance the effect of hearing a message regarding behavioural change, the cultural adaptation to the ethnic minority group, or increase reach to the target group through more appropriate mass media channels. New studies should explore targeted interventions for ethnic minorities with a first language other than the dominant language in their resident country, as well as directly compare targeted versus general population mass media interventions.

Résumé scientifique

Les interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse pour la promotion de comportements sains permettant de réduire le risque de maladies non-transmissibles chez les adultes appartenant à des minorités ethniques

Contexte

L'activité physique, un régime alimentaire équilibré, l'évitement de l'exposition au tabac, et une consommation d'alcool modérée peuvent réduire la morbidité et la mortalité des maladies non-transmissibles (MNTs). Les interventions dans les médias de masse sont couramment utilisées pour encourager une amélioration des comportements de santé dans certaines populations. Il est difficile de savoir si les interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse à l'attention des groupes ethniques minoritaires sont plus ou moins efficaces pour modifier les comportements que les interventions développées pour la population générale.

Objectifs

Déterminer les effets des interventions dans les médias de masse ciblant les adultes appartenant à des minorités ethniques et offrant des messages sur l'activité physique, les habitudes alimentaires, la consommation de tabac ou la consommation d'alcool pour réduire le risque de MNT.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ERIC, SweMed + et ISI Web of Science jusqu'à août 2016. Nous avons également recherché la littérature grise sur OpenGrey, Grey Literature Report, Eldis, et deux sites Web pertinents jusqu'en octobre 2016. Les recherches n'étaient pas limitées par la langue.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons recherché des essais contrôlés randomisés en grappes et individuels, des études contrôlées avant-après (CAA) et des séries temporelles interrompues (STI). Les interventions pertinentes encourageaient de meilleures comportements de santé liés à l'activité physique, aux habitudes alimentaires, à la consommation de tabac ou à la consommation d'alcool ; étaient disséminées via les médias de masse ; et ciblaient des groupes ethniques minoritaires. La population d'intérêt comprenait des adultes (≥ 18 ans) appartenant à des groupes ethniques minoritaires dans les pays principaux. Les principaux critères de jugement incluaient des indicateurs de changement comportemental, le changement de comportement auto-rapporté, les connaissances et les attitudes envers le changement. Les critères de jugement secondaires étaient l'utilisation des services de promotion de la santé et les coûts liés au projet.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment examiné les références afin d'identifier les études à inclure. Nous avons extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais dans les études incluses. Nous n'avons pas regroupé les résultats en raison de l'hétérogénéité des comparaisons, des critères de jugement et des plans d'étude. Nous avons décrit les résultats de manière narrative et nous les présentons dans des tableaux « Résumé des résultats ». Nous avons estimé la qualité des preuves en utilisant l'approche GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation).

Résultats principaux

Six études remplissaient les critères d'inclusion, dont trois ECR, deux ECR en grappes et une STI. Toutes ont été réalisées aux États-Unis et portaient sur des interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse pour les personnes d'origine africaine (quatre études), les immigrés latino parlant principalement l'espagnol (une étude), et les immigrés chinois (une étude). Les deux dernières études offraient l'intervention aux participants dans leur première langue (en espagnol, cantonais, ou en mandarin). Trois interventions ciblaient uniquement des femmes, dont une visait spécifiquement les femmes enceintes. Nous avons jugé toutes les études comme étant à risque incertain de biais dans au moins un domaine et trois études comme étant à risque élevé de biais dans au moins un domaine.

Nous avons classé les résultats en trois comparaisons. La première comparaison a examiné les interventions dans les médias de masse ciblant les minorités ethniques par rapport à une intervention prévue pour la population générale. La seule étude dans cette catégorie (incluant 255 participants d'origine africaine) n'a trouvé que peu ou pas de différence en termes d'effet sur le changement de comportement auto-rapporté pour le tabagisme et seulement de légères différences dans les attitudes face au changement entre les participants qui avaient reçu une brochure culturellement spécifique sur le sevrage tabagique par rapport à une brochure prévue pour la population générale. Nous sommes incertains par rapport aux estimations de l'effet, comme l'indique notre évaluation GRADE (preuves de très faible qualité de l'effet). Aucune étude n'a fourni de données pour les indicateurs du changement comportemental ou des effets indésirables.

La seconde comparaison évaluait les interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse par rapport à l'absence d'intervention. Une étude (154 participants d'origine africaine) a rapporté des effets pour nos principaux critères de jugement. Les participants dans le groupe d'intervention avaient accès à 12 émissions en direct à la télévision d'une durée d'une heure et avaient reçu des brochures durant trois mois concernant la nutrition et l'activité physique pour améliorer la santé et le contrôle du poids. Les changements de l'indice de masse corporelle (IMC) étaient comparables entre les groupes 12 mois après le commencement (preuves de faible qualité). Les scores quant aux habitudes alimentaires (les comportements favorisant la prise de poids) et le total des scores des activités de loisir ont changé et étaient en faveur du groupe d'intervention (preuves de très faible qualité). Deux autres études ont exposé des populations entières dans certaines zones géographiques à des publicités à la radio ciblant les communautés afro-américaines. Deux auteurs ont présenté des effets sur deux de nos critères de jugements secondaires, l'utilisation des services et les coûts des projets de promotion de la santé. Le message clé de la campagne était d'appeler les lignes téléphoniques d'aide pour arrêter de fumer. Le critère de jugement était le nombre d'appels reçu. Après un an, une étude a rapporté 18 appels pour environ 10 000 fumeurs ciblés à partir de la population cible (la population ciblée était estimée à 310 500 personnes), par rapport à 0,2 appels pour environ 10 000 fumeurs ciblés dans les communautés témoins (la population ciblée était estimée à 331 400 personnes) (preuves de qualité modérée). L'étude en STI a également rapporté une augmentation du nombre d'appels de la part de la population cible pendant les campagnes (preuves de faible qualité). La proportion d'appelants afro-américains a augmenté dans les deux études (preuves de qualité faible à très faible). Aucune étude n'a fourni de données sur les connaissances et les attitudes pour le changement et les effets indésirables. Les informations sur les coûts étaient rares.

La troisième comparaison a évalué des interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse par rapport à des interventions dans les médias de masse avec du contenu personnalisé. Les résultats sont basés sur trois études (1361 participants). Les participants dans ces groupes de comparaison recevaient un retour personnalisé. Deux des études ont enregistré les changements de poids au fil du temps. Aucune n'a trouvé de différence significative entre les groupes (preuves de faible qualité). Les données sur les changements comportementaux et les attitudes et connaissances ont généralement montré des effets en faveur du contenu personnalisé ou aucune différence significative entre les groupes (preuves de très faible qualité). Aucune étude n'a fourni de données sur les effets indésirables. Les informations sur les coûts étaient rares.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves disponibles sont insuffisantes pour établir si les interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse destinées à des populations ethniques minoritaires sont plus efficaces pour modifier les comportements de santé que les interventions s'appuyant sur les médias de masse et prévues pour la population générale. Par rapport à l'absence d'intervention, une intervention ciblée dans les médias de masse peut augmenter le nombre d'appels à la centrale téléphonique d'aide pour arrêter de fumer, mais l'effet sur les comportements de santé n'est pas clair. Ces études n'ont pas pu distinguer l'impact des différents composants, par exemple l'effet d'entendre un message concernant le changement de comportement, l'adaptation culturelle pour la minorité ethnique, ou l'augmentation de la portée vers le groupe cible au travers de médias de masse plus appropriés. De nouvelles études devraient étudier les interventions ciblées pour les minorités ethniques dont la première langue est différente de celle dominant dans leur pays de résidence, ainsi que comparer directement les interventions ciblées par rapport à des interventions destinées à la population générale.

Notes de traduction

Traduction réalisée par Martin Vuillème et révisée par Cochrane France

Plain language summary

Targeted mass media interventions to encourage healthier behaviours in adult, ethnic minorities

Background and review question

Health authorities and non-governmental organisations often use mass media interventions (e.g. leaflets, radio and TV advertisements, posters and social media) to encourage healthier behaviours related to physical activity, dietary patterns, tobacco use or alcohol consumption, among others. In this review, we consider the effects of mass media interventions targeted towards ethnic minorities. A targeted intervention is designed for and considers the characteristics of a specific group, ideally providing ethnic minority groups equal opportunities and resources to access information, life skills, and opportunities to make healthier choices. However, we do not know whether targeted mass media strategies are more effective in reaching and influencing ethnic minorities than mass media strategies developed for the general population.

Study characteristics

We found six studies, all from the USA, four of which targeted African Americans and two which targeted Latino or Chinese immigrants. Of the studies, four were experimental (1693 volunteers) and two reported the results of large, targeted campaigns run in whole communities and cities. The evidence is current to August 2016.

Key results

The available evidence is insufficient to conclude whether targeted mass media interventions for ethnic minority groups are more, less or equally effective in changing health behaviours than general mass media interventions. Only one study compared participants' smoking habits and intentions to quit following the receipt of either a culturally adapted smoking advice booklet or a booklet developed for the general population. They found little or no differences in smoking behaviours between the groups.

When compared to no mass media intervention, a targeted mass media intervention may increase the number of calls to smoking quit lines, but the effect on health behaviours is unclear. This conclusion is based on findings from three studies. One study gave participants access to a series of 12 live shows on cable TV with information on how to maintain a healthy weight through diet and physical activity. Compared to women who did not watch the shows, participants reported slightly increased physical activity and some positive changes to their dietary patterns; however, their body weight was no different over time. Two other studies were large-scale targeted campaigns in which smokers were encouraged to call a quit line for smoking cessation advice. The number of telephone calls from the target population increased considerably during the campaign.

This review also compared targeted mass media interventions versus mass media interventions with added personal interactions. These findings, based on three studies, were inconclusive.

None of the studies reported whether the interventions could have had any adverse effects, such as possible stigmatisation or increased resistance to messages.

Further studies directly comparing targeted mass media interventions with general mass media interventions would be useful. Few studies have investigated the effects of targeted mass media interventions for ethnic minority groups who primarily speak a non-dominant language.

Quality of the evidence

Our confidence in the evidence of effect on all main outcomes is low to very low. This means that the true effect may be different or substantially different from the results presented in this review. We have moderate confidence in the estimated increase in the number of calls to smoking quit lines.

Résumé simplifié

Les interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse visant à encourager des comportements plus sains chez les adultes appartenant à des minorités ethniques

Contexte et question de la revue

Les autorités sanitaires et les organisations non-gouvernementales utilisent souvent les médias de masse (par ex. des brochures, publicités à la radio et à la télévision, des posters et les réseaux sociaux) pour encourager des comportements de santé relatifs à l'activité physique, aux habitudes alimentaires et à la consommation de tabac ou d'alcool, notamment. Dans cette revue, nous nous sommes intéressés aux effets des interventions dans les médias de masse ciblant les minorités ethniques. Une intervention ciblée est conçue pour un groupe spécifique et prend en compte ses caractéristiques, idéalement en offrant aux minorités ethniques des opportunités semblables d'avoir accès aux ressources, aux informations, aux compétences, et aux opportunités afin de prendre des décisions plus saines. Cependant, nous ne savons pas si les stratégies ciblées sont plus efficaces pour atteindre et influencer les minorités ethniques que celles développées pour la population générale.

Caractéristiques de l'étude

Nous avons trouvé six études, toutes réalisés aux États-Unis, dont quatre ciblaient les personnes afro-américaines et deux ciblaient les immigrés latinos ou chinois. Parmi ces études, quatre étaient expérimentales (1693 volontaires) et deux essais ont rapporté les résultats de campagnes ciblées de grande taille effectuées dans des communautés tout entières et dans des villes. Les preuves sont à jour jusqu'à août 2016.

Résultats principaux

Les preuves disponibles sont insuffisantes pour déterminer si les interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse, destinées aux groupes ethniques minoritaires sont plus, moins ou tout autant efficaces pour modifier les comportements de santé que les interventions générales réalisées dans les médias de masse. Seule une étude a comparé les habitudes tabagiques des participants et leur intention d'arrêter de fumer suite à l'offre d'une brochure culturellement adaptée de conseils sur le tabagisme ou d'une brochure développée pour la population générale. Les chercheurs n'ont trouvé que très peu ou pas de différences dans les comportements tabagiques entre les groupes.

Par rapport à l'absence d'intervention, une intervention ciblée dans les médias de masse pourrait augmenter le nombre d'appels vers les centres téléphoniques d'aide aux personnes souhaitant arrêter de fumer, mais l'effet sur les comportements de santé n'est pas clair. Cette conclusion est basée sur les résultats de trois études. Dans une étude les participants avaient accès à une série de 12 émissions en direct à la télévision offrant des informations sur la manière de maintenir un poids sain au travers de l'alimentation et de l'activité physique. Par rapport aux femmes n'ayant pas regardé les émissions, les participants rapportaient une légère augmentation de leur activité physique et quelques changements positifs au niveau de leurs habitudes alimentaires ; toutefois, leur poids n'a pas changé au fil du temps. Dans deux autres études à large échelle portant sur des campagnes ciblées, les fumeurs étaient encouragés à téléphoner à une ligne téléphonique d'aide aux personnes souhaitant arrêter de fumer. Le nombre d'appels téléphoniques de la population cible a considérablement augmenté au cours de la campagne.

Cette revue comparait également les interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse à des interventions avec ajout d'interactions personnelles. Ces résultats, sur la base de trois études, n'étaient pas concluants.

Aucune des études n'a rapporté si les interventions pouvaient avoir eu des effets indésirables, tels qu'une éventuelle stigmatisation ou une résistance accrue aux messages.

D'autres études comparant directement des interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse avec des interventions générales seraient utiles. Peu d'études ont évalué les effets des interventions ciblées dans les médias de masse pour les groupes ethniques minoritaires parlant principalement une langue non dominante.

Qualité des preuves

Notre confiance dans les preuves quant aux effets pour tous les principaux critères de jugement est faible à très faible. Cela signifie que le véritable effet pourrait être différent voire même considérablement différent par rapport aux résultats présentés dans cette revue. Nous avons une confiance modérée dans l'estimation de l'augmentation du nombre d'appels aux centres d'aides pour arrêter de fumer.

Notes de traduction

Traduction réalisée par Martin Vuillème et révisée par Cochrane France