Functional magnetic resonance imaging in spontaneous attacks of SUNCT: Short-lasting neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing

Authors

  • A. May,

    1. University Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
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  • A. Bahra,

    1. University Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
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  • C. Büchel,

    1. Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
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  • R. Turner,

    1. Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
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  • P. J. Goadsby

    Corresponding author
    1. University Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK
    • Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK
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Abstract

A 71-year-old woman presented with a short history of episodes of severe left-sided orbital and temporal pain in paroxysms lasting 60 to 90 seconds, and accompanied by ipsilateral lacrimation of the eye, rhinorrhea, and conjunctival injection. Results of clinical examination and structural imaging were normal and a clinical diagnosis of SUNCT (short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform pains with conjunctival injection and tearing) was made. The patient had a BOLD contrast–magnetic resonance imaging study in which significant activation was seen in the region of the ipsilateral hypothalamic gray, comparing the pain to pain-free state. The region of activation was the same in this patient as has been reported in acute attacks of cluster headache.

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