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Geophysical Research Letters

Earthquake magnitude scaling using seismogeodetic data

Authors

  • Brendan W. Crowell,

    Corresponding author
    1. Now at Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA
    2. Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, La Jolla, California, USA
    • Corresponding author: B. W. Crowell, Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Johnson Hall Rm-070, Box 351310, 4000 15th Avenue NE, Seattle, WA 98195-1310, USA. (crowellb@uw.edu)

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  • Diego Melgar,

    1. Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, La Jolla, California, USA
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  • Yehuda Bock,

    1. Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, La Jolla, California, USA
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  • Jennifer S. Haase,

    1. Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, La Jolla, California, USA
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  • Jianghui Geng

    1. Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, La Jolla, California, USA
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Abstract

[1] The combination of GPS and strong-motion data to estimate seismogeodetic waveforms creates a data set that is sensitive to the entire spectrum of ground displacement and the full extent of coseismic slip. In this study we derive earthquake magnitude scaling relationships using seismogeodetic observations of either P wave amplitude or peak ground displacements from five earthquakes in Japan and California ranging in magnitude from 5.3 to 9.0. The addition of the low-frequency component allows rapid distinction of earthquake size for large magnitude events with high precision, unlike accelerometer data that saturate for earthquakes greater than M 7 to 8, and is available well before the coseismic displacements are emplaced. These results, though based on a limited seismogeodetic data set, support earlier studies that propose it may be possible to estimate the final magnitude of an earthquake well before the rupture is complete.

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