Basin-Wide Oceanographic Array Bridges the South Atlantic

Authors

  • I. J. Ansorge,

    1. Department of Oceanography and Marine Research Institute, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, South Africa
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  • M. O. Baringer,

    1. Physical Oceanography Division, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Miami, Fla.
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  • E. J. D. Campos,

    1. Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • S. Dong,

    1. Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, Miami, Fla.
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  • R. A. Fine,

    1. Physical Oceanography Division, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Miami, Fla.
    2. Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Fla.
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  • S. L. Garzoli,

    1. Physical Oceanography Division, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Miami, Fla.
    2. Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, Miami, Fla.
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  • G. Goni,

    1. Physical Oceanography Division, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Miami, Fla.
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  • C. S. Meinen,

    1. Physical Oceanography Division, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Miami, Fla.
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  • R. C. Perez,

    1. Physical Oceanography Division, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Miami, Fla.
    2. Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, Miami, Fla.
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  • A. R. Piola,

    1. Departamento de Oceanografía, Servicio de Hidrografía Naval, Buenos Aires, Argentina
    2. Departamento de Ciencias de la Atmósfera y los Océanos, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
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  • M. J. Roberts,

    1. Oceans and Coasts Research, Department of Environmental Affairs, Roggebaai, South Africa
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  • S. Speich,

    1. Laboratoire de Physique des Océans, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale Brest, France
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  • J. Sprintall,

    1. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla
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  • T. Terre,

    1. Laboratoire de Physique des Océans, Ifremer,Plouzané, France
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  • M. A. Van den Berg

    1. Oceans and Coasts Research, Department of Environmental Affairs, Roggebaai, South Africa
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Abstract

The meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is a global system of surface, intermediate, and deep ocean currents. The MOC connects the surface layer of the ocean and the atmosphere with the huge reservoir of the deep sea and is the primary mechanism for transporting heat, freshwater, and carbon between ocean basins. Climate models show that past changes in the strength of the MOC were linked to historical climate variations. Further research suggests that the MOC will continue to modulate climate change scenarios on time scales ranging from decades to centuries [Latif et al., 2006].

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