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Electrodynamics, Classical

  1. J. D. Jackson

Published Online: 15 APR 2003

DOI: 10.1002/3527600434.eap109

Encyclopedia of Applied Physics

Encyclopedia of Applied Physics

How to Cite

Jackson, J. D. 2003. Electrodynamics, Classical. Encyclopedia of Applied Physics. .

Author Information

  1. University of California at Berkeley, Department of Physics, Berkeley, California, U.S.A.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 APR 2003
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Figure 1. (a) Closed circuit in Faraday's law. The closed path C(t) changes in time Δt to C(t + Δt). The surface spanning C(t + Δt), with directed area element nda, can be taken as that spanning C(t), minus the “sides” defined by the directed area elements dl × vΔt around the path. (b) A long conducting right circular cylinder of radius a rotates about its axis at constant angular frequency ω in a uniform magnetic field B parallel to the axis.

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Figure 2. Schematic diagram of boundary surface (heavy line) between different media. The boundary is assumed to carry idealized surface charge and current densities, σ and K. The volume V is a pillbox with its plane surfaces parallel to the interface. The normal n to the planes points from medium 1 to medium 2. The rectangular contour C, half in one medium and half in the other, is oriented so that the normal t to its spanning surface is tangent to the interface. [From Jackson (1975), reproduced by permission of John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]

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Figure 3. Real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant ε(ω) as functions of frequency ω in the neighborhood of two resonances. [From Jackson (1975), reproduced by permission of John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]

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Figure 4. Some capacitance geometries: parallel plates (upper left), coaxial cylinders (upper right), parallel circular wires (lower left), and closed conducting surface S, with inscribed (S<) and circumscribed (S>) surfaces (lower right).

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Figure 5. Some inductance geometries: parallel circular wire transmission line (upper left), coaxial cylinder transmission line (upper right), circular loop of wire (lower left), circular toroid of rectangular cross section (lower right).

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Figure 6. Schematic diagrams of arbitrary, two-terminal, linear, passive electromagnetic systems. The surface S completely surrounds the system; only the input terminals protrude. At the terminals, the input current and voltage are Ii and Vi, with the input impedance defined through Vi = ZIi. The upper diagram pertains to low frequencies, the lower, with its coaxial feed, to high frequencies where radiation resistance may enter. [From Jackson (1975), reproduced by permission of John Wiley & Sons, Inc.]