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Antibody Molecules, Genetic Engineering of


  1. Manuel L. Penichet,
  2. Sherie L. Morrison

Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

DOI: 10.1002/3527600906.mcb.200200007

Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine

Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine

How to Cite

Penichet, M. L. and Morrison, S. L. 2006. Antibody Molecules, Genetic Engineering of. Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine. .

Author Information

  1. University of California, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (5 OCT 2015)


Antibodies have long been appreciated for their exquisite specificity. With the development of the hybridoma technology, it was possible to produce rodent (mouse or rat) monoclonal antibodies that are the product of a single clone of antibody-producing cells and have only one antigen-binding specificity. Advances in genetic engineering and expression systems have been applied to overcome problems of immunogenicity of rodent-produced antibodies and to improve their ability to trigger human immune effector mechanisms. The production of chimeric, humanized, and totally human antibodies as well as antibodies with novel structures and functional properties has resulted in improved monoclonal antibodies. As a consequence, recombinant antibody-based therapies are now used to treat a variety of diverse conditions that include infectious diseases, inflammatory disorders, and cancer. This article summarizes and compares different strategies for developing recombinant antibodies and their derivatives.


  • Antibody/Antigen;
  • Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC);
  • Bacteriophage;
  • Complement;
  • Constant Region;
  • Fab;
  • Fc;
  • Fv/scFv;
  • Hybridoma;
  • Variable Region