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Anthrax ( Bacillus anthracis ), Molecular Biology of

Molecular Biology of Specific Diseases

  1. Kathryn B. Garber

Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

DOI: 10.1002/3527600906.mcb.200300095

Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine

Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine

How to Cite

Garber, K. B. 2006. Anthrax ( Bacillus anthracis ), Molecular Biology of. Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine. .

Author Information

  1. Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Human Genetics, Atlanta, GA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

Abstract

Bacillus anthracis , the causative agent of anthrax, has been a subject of research for over 150 years, beginning with the work of Rayer and Davaine who found “small filiform bodies” in the blood of anthrax-infected sheep and, from this finding, coined the term bacteria. Several years later, Koch proved conclusively that B. anthracis was the causative agent of anthrax, providing the first demonstration that a disease was caused by a specific bacterium. He later developed the first live attenuated bacterial vaccine with a heat-attenuated strain of B. anthracis . Despite its illustrious beginnings as a subject of research, an understanding of the molecular biology of B. anthracis has lagged behind that of some other bacteria. Bacillus anthracis has recently come back into focus as a target of research with the goal of being able to readily detect this bacterium in environmental samples and to understand its pathogenesis and evolution better.

Keywords:

  • Spore;
  • Phagosome;
  • Endocytosis;
  • Transposon;
  • Virulence Factor;
  • Regulon