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Methanogens and the Archaebacteria, Molecular Biology of

Molecular Biology of Specific Organisms

  1. Madeline E. Rasche1,
  2. James G. Ferry2

Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

DOI: 10.1002/3527600906.mcb.200400019

Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine

Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine

How to Cite

Rasche, M. E. and Ferry, J. G. 2006. Methanogens and the Archaebacteria, Molecular Biology of. Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine. .

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA

  2. 2

    The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16801, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

Abstract

Although members of the domain Archaea are prokaryotic in cell structure, 16S rRNA sequencing reveals that they form a phylogenetically coherent group, which is separate from both Bacteria (Eubacteria, domain Bacteria) and eucaryotes (Eucarya, domain Eucarya). The Archaea are further distinguished by the ether-lipid composition of cytoplasmic membranes and cell wall components not found in either the Bacteria or Eucarya domains. Like in Bacteria, transcription and translation in Archaea take place in the same cellular compartment. Unlike Bacteria, Archaea possess a complex DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and genes with promoter elements similar to the TATA box of eucaryotes. Archaea produce and utilize homologs to eukaryotic transcription-initiation factors, which are not found in the Bacteria domain. The methane-producing Archaea (methanoarchaea) are the most diverse and extensively studied group of the Archaea. The strictly anaerobic methanoarchaea are terminal organisms in the anaerobic phase of the global carbon cycle.

Keywords:

  • Domain;
  • Domain Archaea (Formerly Archaebacteria);
  • Domain Bacteria (Formerly Eubacteria);
  • Domain Eucarya;
  • Prokaryote