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Nucleic Acid Hybrids, Formation and Structure of

Nucleic Acids

  1. James G. Wetmur

Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

DOI: 10.1002/3527600906.mcb.200400045

Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine

Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine

How to Cite

Wetmur, J. G. 2006. Nucleic Acid Hybrids, Formation and Structure of. Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine. .

Author Information

  1. Department of Microbiology, New York, NY, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

Abstract

Hybridization is the formation of partially or completely double-stranded (duplex) nucleic acid (DNA:DNA, DNA:RNA, or RNA:RNA) by sequence-specific interaction of two complementary single-stranded nucleic acids. Reassociation or renaturation are often used to describe hybridization between completely complementary DNA or RNA strands. Solution hybridization is an integral part of the polymerase chain reaction. Hybridization is often carried out using a labeled probe in an attempt to detect the existence and quantity of complementary sequence in a complex nucleic acid mixture. The target is often immobilized, as in Southern and other blotting techniques. This chapter deals with the physical chemical aspects of hybridization, in particular, thermodynamics and kinetics. Melting temperatures, hybridization rates, and dissociation rates and temperatures are interrelated. Details are provided for calculation of these useful properties and examples of calculations are provided.

Keywords:

  • Blot;
  • Dissociation Temperature;
  • Hybrid;
  • Melting Temperature;
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR);
  • Strand Separation Temperature