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Intracellular Fatty Acid Binding Proteins and Fatty Acid Transport

Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids

  1. Judith Storch1,
  2. Lindsay McDermott2

Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

DOI: 10.1002/3527600906.mcb.200400153

Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine

Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine

How to Cite

Storch, J. and McDermott, L. 2006. Intracellular Fatty Acid Binding Proteins and Fatty Acid Transport. Reviews in Cell Biology and Molecular Medicine. .

Author Information

  1. 1

    Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ

  2. 2

    University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 15 SEP 2006

Abstract

Long-chain fatty acids (FA) are required by cells as membrane phospholipid constituents, metabolic substrates, precursors for signaling molecules, and mediators of gene expression. They are in constant flux and need to enter and leave cells rapidly and, presumably, in a regulated manner. The relatively low aqueous solubility of fatty acids would strongly suggest that specific and efficient mechanisms must exist for their intracellular transport. High levels of fatty acid–binding proteins (FABPs) are found within cells, and, although it has been shown that these proteins noncovalently bind fatty acids with high affinity, their true in vivo functions have remained elusive. This chapter focuses on recent findings assessing the transport function of FABPs, and on data supporting putative mechanisms by which FABPs may be involved in cellular FA uptake, efflux, and intracellular transport.

Keywords:

  • Cell Transfections;
  • Fatty Acids;
  • Knockout Mouse;
  • Lipid-binding Proteins;
  • Lipid Transport