Characterization and Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Copper Obtained by Powder Metallurgy

  1. Prof. Dr. Michael Zehetbauer3 and
  2. Prof. Ruslan Z. Valiev4
  1. C. Langlois1,
  2. M.J. Hÿtch1,
  3. P. Langlois2,
  4. S. Lartigue1 and
  5. Y. Champion1

Published Online: 28 JAN 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527602461.ch10b

Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation

Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation

How to Cite

Langlois, C., Hÿtch, M.J., Langlois, P., Lartigue, S. and Champion, Y. (2004) Characterization and Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Copper Obtained by Powder Metallurgy, in Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation (eds M. Zehetbauer and R. Z. Valiev), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527602461.ch10b

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Institut für Materialphysik, Universität Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Wien, Austria

  2. 4

    Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, 12 K. Marks Str., Ufa, 450 000, Russia

Author Information

  1. 1

    Centre d'Etudes de Chimie Métallurgique CECM-CNRS, Vitry-sur-Seine, France

  2. 2

    Laboratoire d'Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Hautes Pressions LIMHP-CNRS, Villetaneuse, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JAN 2005
  2. Published Print: 25 FEB 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527306596

Online ISBN: 9783527602469

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Keywords:

  • powder metallurgy;
  • nanostructured materials;
  • mechanical properties;
  • nanocrystalline copper;
  • cold isostatic compaction;
  • sintering;
  • differential room temperature extrusion;
  • nanocrystalline powders

Summary

Nanostructured materials are of considerable interest from a fundamental viewpoint but also due to their high potential for applications in new technologies. For metals, progress in both strength and ductility are opening new perspectives for specific applications. However, the properties of these materials are strongly related to their microstructure and hence on the synthesis route chosen for fabrication. The wide variety of results obtained for the mechanical properties of nanomaterials is typical of this problem [1]. Hence, a careful characterization of the material is necessary to understand the behaviour and to identify the structural parameters controlling the properties. This paper presents the microstructure obtained for each processing step of bulk nanocrystalline copper after cold isostatic compaction, sintering and differential room temperature extrusion of nanocrystalline powders.