Processing and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Aluminum Obtained by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP)

  1. Prof. Dr. Michael Zehetbauer2 and
  2. Prof. Ruslan Z. Valiev3
  1. S. Billard,
  2. G. Dirras,
  3. J.P. Fondere and
  4. B. Bacroix

Published Online: 28 JAN 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527602461.ch10e

Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation

Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation

How to Cite

Billard, S., Dirras, G., Fondere, J.P. and Bacroix, B. (2004) Processing and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Aluminum Obtained by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), in Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation (eds M. Zehetbauer and R. Z. Valiev), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527602461.ch10e

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Institut für Materialphysik, Universität Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Wien, Austria

  2. 3

    Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, 12 K. Marks Str., Ufa, 450 000, Russia

Author Information

  1. Laboratoire des Propriétés Mécaniques et Thermodynamiques des Matériaux (LPMTM) CNRS, Institut Galilée, Université Paris 13, Villetaneuse, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JAN 2005
  2. Published Print: 25 FEB 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527306596

Online ISBN: 9783527602469

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Keywords:

  • nanocrystalline aluminum;
  • hot isostatic pressing (HIP);
  • processing;
  • characterization;
  • nanometric metallic powders

Summary

Nanocrystalline materials are the object of an increasing attention since the first works of Gleiter [1]. This class of materials offers a range of very promising mechanical properties, mostly because of the important reduction in the grain size. Due to the difficulties in obtaining reasonable amounts of material, studies devoted to measuring the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials other than by microhardness tests are scarce [2–4]. It appears then that the optimization of the methods for processing fully dense nanocrystalline materials is a crucial step for understanding their latent properties. Nevertheless, in spite of the variety of techniques to produce these materials in sufficient quantities (see for example [4–7] for nanocrystalline aluminum), the HIP process [8] is an interesting method to obtain large bulk and fully dense material from nanometric metallic powders.