Microstructural Evolution during Severe Deformation in Austenitic Stainless Steel with Second Phase Particles

  1. Prof. Dr. Michael Zehetbauer2 and
  2. Prof. Ruslan Z. Valiev3
  1. H. Miura,
  2. H. Hamaji and
  3. T. Sakai

Published Online: 28 JAN 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527602461.ch6i

Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation

Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation

How to Cite

Miura, H., Hamaji, H. and Sakai, T. (2004) Microstructural Evolution during Severe Deformation in Austenitic Stainless Steel with Second Phase Particles, in Nanomaterials by Severe Plastic Deformation (eds M. Zehetbauer and R. Z. Valiev), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527602461.ch6i

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Institut für Materialphysik, Universität Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Wien, Austria

  2. 3

    Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, 12 K. Marks Str., Ufa, 450 000, Russia

Author Information

  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering and Intelligent Systems, University of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JAN 2005
  2. Published Print: 25 FEB 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527306596

Online ISBN: 9783527602469

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • microstructural evolution;
  • severe deformation;
  • austenitic stainless steel;
  • second phase particles;
  • ultra-fine grain evolution;
  • electron microscopy

Summary

The effect of large amount of dispersed particles on ultra-fine grain (UFG) evolution by severe large deformation was investigated. For that purpose, austenitic stainless steels containing about 1 vol.% of second phase particles, which radii ranging from 10 to 140 nm, were multi-axially compressed to a strain of ϵ = 6 at maximum at 873 K. Microstructures of dislocation walls, sub-boundaries and grain boundaries were gradually developed as strain increased. UFG evolution, ranging up to 0.2 µm uniformly took place at ϵ = 6. UFGs evolved both in austenitic stainless steels with particles and without particles. The feature of grain boundaries or dislocation walls in the stainless steel with higher density of particles, however, were not so sharp nor highly contrasted compared with those of particle-free austenitic stainless steel. Recovery process seemed very important for UFG evolution in materials with dispersed fine particles.