Chapter 14. Quantum Computation Using Quantum Dot Spins and Microcavities

  1. Prof. Dr. Samuel L. Braunstein3,
  2. Dr. Hoi-Kwong Lo4 and
  3. Pieter Kok Assistant Editor3
  1. A. Imamoḡlu1,2

Published Online: 28 JAN 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527603182.ch14

Scalable Quantum Computers: Paving the Way to Realization

Scalable Quantum Computers: Paving the Way to Realization

How to Cite

Imamoḡlu, A. (2000) Quantum Computation Using Quantum Dot Spins and Microcavities, in Scalable Quantum Computers: Paving the Way to Realization (eds S. L. Braunstein, H.-K. Lo and P. Kok), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527603182.ch14

Editor Information

  1. 3

    University of Wales, Bangor, UK

  2. 4

    MagiQ Technologies, Inc., New York, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JAN 2005
  2. Published Print: 20 DEC 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527403219

Online ISBN: 9783527603183

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Keywords:

  • quantum computation;
  • quantum computing;
  • quantum dot spins;
  • microcavity

Summary

The coherence times of conduction-band electronic spins are typically several orders of magnitude longer than other relevant timescales. A solid-state quantum computer based on localized electron spins as qubits is therefore of potential interest. Here, a scheme that realizes controlled interactions between two distant quantum dot spins is reviewed. The effective long-range interaction is mediated by the vacuum field of a high finesse microcavity. By using spin-flip Raman transitions induced by classical laser fields and the cavity-mode, parallel controlled-not operations and arbitrary single qubit rotations can be realized.

PACS: 03.67.Lx, 42.50.Dv, 03.65.Bz