Chapter 6. Quantum Computation with Trapped Ions, Atoms and Light

  1. Prof. Dr. Samuel L. Braunstein2,
  2. Dr. Hoi-Kwong Lo3 and
  3. Pieter Kok Assistant Editor2
  1. A. M. Steane and
  2. D. M. Lucas

Published Online: 28 JAN 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527603182.ch6

Scalable Quantum Computers: Paving the Way to Realization

Scalable Quantum Computers: Paving the Way to Realization

How to Cite

Steane, A. M. and Lucas, D. M. (2000) Quantum Computation with Trapped Ions, Atoms and Light, in Scalable Quantum Computers: Paving the Way to Realization (eds S. L. Braunstein, H.-K. Lo and P. Kok), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527603182.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 2

    University of Wales, Bangor, UK

  2. 3

    MagiQ Technologies, Inc., New York, USA

Author Information

  1. Centre for Quantum Computation, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, England

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JAN 2005
  2. Published Print: 20 DEC 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527403219

Online ISBN: 9783527603183

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Keywords:

  • quantum computation;
  • quantum computing;
  • trapped ions;
  • atoms;
  • light

Summary

We first consider the basic requirements for a quantum computer, arguing for the attractiveness of nuclear spins as information-bearing entities, and light for the coupling which allows quantum gates. We then survey the strengths of and immediate prospects for quantum information processing in ion traps. We discuss decoherence and gate rates in ion traps, comparing methods based on the vibrational motion with a method based on exchange of photons in cavity QED. We then sketch the main features of a quantum computer designed to allow an algorithm needing 106 Toffoli gates on 100 logical qubits. We find that around 200 ion traps linked by optical fibres and high-finesse cavities could perform such an algorithm in a week to a month, using components at or near current levels of technology.