Chapter 9. NMR Quantum Computation: A Critical Evaluation

  1. Prof. Dr. Samuel L. Braunstein3,
  2. Dr. Hoi-Kwong Lo4 and
  3. Pieter Kok Assistant Editor3
  1. J. A. Jones1,2

Published Online: 28 JAN 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527603182.ch9

Scalable Quantum Computers: Paving the Way to Realization

Scalable Quantum Computers: Paving the Way to Realization

How to Cite

Jones, J. A. (2005) NMR Quantum Computation: A Critical Evaluation, in Scalable Quantum Computers: Paving the Way to Realization (eds S. L. Braunstein, H.-K. Lo and P. Kok), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527603182.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 3

    University of Wales, Bangor, UK

  2. 4

    MagiQ Technologies, Inc., New York, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Centre for Quantum Computation, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, UK

  2. 2

    Oxford Centre for Molecular Sciences, New Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX 1 3QT, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JAN 2005
  2. Published Print: 20 DEC 2000

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527403219

Online ISBN: 9783527603183

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Keywords:

  • NMR quantum computation;
  • quantum computing;
  • evaluation

Summary

Liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have produced some spectacular successes in the construction of small quantum computers, and NMR is currently by far the leading technology for quantum computation. There are, however, a number of significant problems with any attempt to scale up the technology to produce computers of any useful size. While it is probable that some of these will be successfully sidestepped during the next few years, it is unlikely that they will all be solved; thus current liquid state NMR techniques are unlikely to provide a viable technology for practical quantum computation.