134. Thermal Spraying of Magnesium Alloys for Corrosion and Wear Protection

  1. Prof. Dr. K. U. Kainer
  1. Erich Lugscheider1,
  2. Maria Parco1,*,
  3. Prof. Dr. K. U. Kainer4 and
  4. N. Hort2

Published Online: 22 APR 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527603565.ch134

Magnesium: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference Magnesium Alloys and Their Applications

Magnesium: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference Magnesium Alloys and Their Applications

How to Cite

Lugscheider, E., Parco, M., Kainer, K. U. and Hort, N. (2003) Thermal Spraying of Magnesium Alloys for Corrosion and Wear Protection, in Magnesium: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference Magnesium Alloys and Their Applications (ed K. U. Kainer), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527603565.ch134

Editor Information

  1. GKSS-Forschungszentrum, Institut für Werkstoffforschung, Max-Planck-Straße, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany

Author Information

  1. 1

    Materials Science Institute, Aachen University of technology, Aachen, Germany

  2. 2

    GKSS-Research Centre Geesthacht GmbH, Geesthacht, Germany

  3. 4

    GKSS-Forschungszentrum, Institut für Werkstoffforschung, Max-Planck-Straße, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany

*Tel.: +49-241-16602-27; fax: +49-241-16602-17

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 APR 2005
  2. Published Print: 27 NOV 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527309757

Online ISBN: 9783527603565

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Keywords:

  • magnesium;
  • wear;
  • corrosion;
  • thermal spraying

Summary

The extreme lightweight of magnesium alloys makes them attractive for all parts that are moved or lifted during their manufacture and application. However, the employment of magnesium alloys in light components subjected to abrasive/erosive conditions or corrosive medium demands in many cases a surface protection of the part. New magnesium alloys have been developed to meet the need of many structural applications, especially with regard to the corrosion resistance. Fibre and particle reinforcement techniques have been used for improving properties such as wear resistance.

In this study, magnesium alloys were coated using electric arc and high velocity-oxy fuel spraying processes to achieve the surface protection. Two commercial relevant cast alloys, AZ91 und AM50, were employed as substrates. The wear resistance of the coated specimens was investigated using ball-on-disc tests. Since arc spray coatings usually contain open porosity, the effectiveness of two different sealers was investigated in order to improve the corrosion resistance of the coated specimen. The corrosion resistance was investigated using a salt immersion test (3% NaCl).

Due to the high oxygen affinity of magnesium, the substrate surface oxidises very fast in an air atmosphere. Within a few minutes, a hydroxyl film is usually formed on the surface. This film can significantly lower the adhesion of thermal spray coatings to the substrate. To achieve a satisfactory bonding strength, measures such as preheating of the substrate and post-heat-treating of the sprayed specimens were investigated. The results were statistically analysed and correlated for quantitative evaluation of the influence of the two selected measures on the coating adhesion, namely pre-heating and post-heat-treatment, and additionally of the coating and substrate material.