142. Friction Welding of Magnesium: Microstructural Characterization

  1. Prof. Dr. K. U. Kainer
  1. A.L. Bowles1,
  2. N. Hort1,
  3. A. Meyer1,
  4. J. F. dos Santos1 and
  5. Prof. Dr. K. U. Kainer2

Published Online: 22 APR 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527603565.ch142

Magnesium: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference Magnesium Alloys and Their Applications

Magnesium: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference Magnesium Alloys and Their Applications

How to Cite

Bowles, A.L., Hort, N., Meyer, A., dos Santos, J. F. and Kainer, K. U. (2003) Friction Welding of Magnesium: Microstructural Characterization, in Magnesium: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference Magnesium Alloys and Their Applications (ed K. U. Kainer), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527603565.ch142

Editor Information

  1. GKSS-Forschungszentrum, Institut für Werkstoffforschung, Max-Planck-Straße, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany

Author Information

  1. 1

    GKSS Forschungszentrum GmbH, Geesthacht, Germany

  2. 2

    GKSS-Forschungszentrum, Institut für Werkstoffforschung, Max-Planck-Straße, 21502 Geesthacht, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 APR 2005
  2. Published Print: 27 NOV 2003

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527309757

Online ISBN: 9783527603565

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Keywords:

  • friction welding of magnesium;
  • microstructural characterization

Summary

AZ91 is used extensively in automotive applications, however its use is limited by a low property profile at moderate temperatures (>120 ° C). To improve the property profile and therefore the number of applications for AZ91, there are three main possibilities: alloy development, addition of reinforcements (MMC's) or local materials engineering. While alloy development has led to a number of new alloys based on AZ91 which can be manufactured by high pressure die casting, the development of AZ91 based metal matrix composites has not been completely successful when compared to other matrix alloys, and local materials engineering is a relatively unexplored area of magnesium research. In this instance friction welding has been adopted for the manufacture of components with locally improved properties by joining studs of creep resistant magnesium alloy AE42 to base magnesium alloy AZ91. With this technique, high integrity studs with superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures can be joined to cast components for an overall improvement in the properties at a lower cost than manufacturing the entire component from the creep resistant alloy.

The paper presents initial results from the microstructural investigations of friction welded joints between AZ91 base material and AE42 alloy inserts.