Chapter 19. Manipulation of Centrosomes and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton during Infection by Intracellular Pathogens

  1. Prof. Dr. Erich A. Nigg
  1. Niki Scaplehorn and
  2. Michael Way

Published Online: 17 JUN 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527603808.ch19

Centrosomes in Development and Disease

Centrosomes in Development and Disease

How to Cite

Scaplehorn, N. and Way, M. (2004) Manipulation of Centrosomes and the Microtubule Cytoskeleton during Infection by Intracellular Pathogens, in Centrosomes in Development and Disease (ed E. A. Nigg), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527603808.ch19

Editor Information

  1. Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Department of Cell Biology, Am Klopferspitz 18a, 82152 Martinsried, Germany

Author Information

  1. Cell Motility Group, Cancer Research UK, Lincoln's Inn Fields Laboratories, 44 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PX, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 17 JUN 2005
  2. Published Print: 27 JUL 2004

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527309801

Online ISBN: 9783527603800

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Keywords:

  • centrosomes in development;
  • centrosomes in disease;
  • microtubule cytoskeleton;
  • infection;
  • intracellular pathogens;
  • viral infection;
  • motor proteins;
  • herpes simplex virus;
  • poliovirus;
  • retroviruses;
  • cytoplasmic assembly;
  • vaccinia virus;
  • African swine fever virus;
  • microtubule network;
  • centrosomal damage;
  • centrosome duplication cycle;
  • spindle checkpoints;
  • paramyxoviral syncytia;
  • human immunodeficiency virus;
  • DNA damage checkpoint;
  • DNA tumor viruses;
  • retinoblastoma;
  • Ran GTPase;
  • human T-cell leukemia virus-1;
  • bacterial manipulation of the centrosome;
  • bacterial manipulation of the microtubules

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Microtubule-directed Movement of Viruses and Membrane Compartments during Viral Infection

    • Targeting the Nucleus using Motor-proteins and the Microtubule Network: Herpes Simplex Virus, Poliovirus and Retroviruses

    • Hijacking Motor Proteins to Promote Cytoplasmic Assembly and Spread: Vaccinia Virus and African Swine Fever Virus

    • Conclusion

  • Virus-mediated Damage to the Centrosome and Microtubule Network

    • Viral Disruption of Microtubule Organization

    • Virus-mediated Centrosomal Damage

    • Summary

  • Viral Disruption of the Centrosome Duplication Cycle and Spindle Checkpoints

    • Early Studies on Centrosome Number: Paramyxoviral Syncytia

    • Multiple Centrosomes: Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the DNA Damage Checkpoint

    • Multiple Centrosomes: DNA Tumor Viruses, Retinoblastoma and Ran GTPase

    • Targeting the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint: Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus-1

    • Summary

  • Bacterial Manipulation of the Centrosome and Microtubules

    • Bacterial Manipulation of the Microtubule Network

    • Interactions between Bacteria and the Centrosome

    • Summary

  • Conclusion

  • Acknowledgments

  • References