Non-Destructive Imaging Techniques for Damage Evaluation of Smart Materials

  1. Dr. P. J. Winkler
  1. Gerhard Mook,
  2. Juergen Pohl,
  3. Fritz Michel,
  4. Thomas Benziger and
  5. Andreas Hilbig

Published Online: 23 DEC 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527606025.ch31

Materials for Transportation Technology, Volume 1

Materials for Transportation Technology, Volume 1

How to Cite

Mook, G., Pohl, J., Michel, F., Benziger, T. and Hilbig, A. (2000) Non-Destructive Imaging Techniques for Damage Evaluation of Smart Materials, in Materials for Transportation Technology, Volume 1 (ed P. J. Winkler), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527606025.ch31

Editor Information

  1. DaimlerChrysler AG, Forschung und Technologie, Postfach 800 465, 81663 München, Germany; Tel.: 089–607 22393; Fax: 089–607 28627

Author Information

  1. University of Magdeburg, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 DEC 2005
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2000

Book Series:

  1. EUROMAT 99

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527301249

Online ISBN: 9783527606023

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • transportation technology;
  • materials;
  • aerospace applications;
  • smart materials;
  • damage evaluation of smart materials;
  • non-destructive imaging techniques

Summary

Smart materials based on carbon fiber-reinforced plastics with integrated piezoceramic sensors and actuators are expected to be a favorite composite for vibration damping and noise reduction [11]. A figure presents the material system. Significant differences between mechanical and thermal properties of the ceramic patches and the matrix demand sophisticated manufacturing techniques. Various damage mechanisms may reduce or even destroy the sensing and actuating capabilities of the piezoceramic material. To improve the performance and to predict the reliable life-time of adaptive structures it is necessary to analyze and describe quantitatively the damage process as a complex microscale interaction between the embedded patches and the host structure. Non-destructive imaging techniques contribute to create a suitable damage tolerance concept.