Macroscopic and Mesoscopic Models for Fracture in Sheet Metal Forming

  1. Prof. Yves Bréchet
  1. Helmut Gese and
  2. Harry Dell

Published Online: 19 DEC 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527606157.ch25

Microstructures, Mechanical Properties and Processes - Computer Simulation and Modelling, Volume 3

Microstructures, Mechanical Properties and Processes - Computer Simulation and Modelling, Volume 3

How to Cite

Gese, H. and Dell, H. (2000) Macroscopic and Mesoscopic Models for Fracture in Sheet Metal Forming, in Microstructures, Mechanical Properties and Processes - Computer Simulation and Modelling, Volume 3 (ed Y. Bréchet), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527606157.ch25

Editor Information

  1. Institut Nat. Polytechnique de Grenoble, L.T.P.-C.M. ENSEEG, BP75, Domaine Universitaires, 38402 Saint Martin D'Hères Cedex, France; Tel.: 0033–76–82 6610; Fax: 0033–76–82 6644

Author Information

  1. MATFEM Partnerschaft Dr. Gese & Oberhofer, München, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 DEC 2005
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2000

Book Series:

  1. EUROMAT 99

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527301225

Online ISBN: 9783527606153

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Keywords:

  • microstructures;
  • computer simulation;
  • mechanical properties;
  • fracture in sheet metal forming;
  • macroscopic and mesoscopic models

Summary

Numerical simulation of sheet metal forming is already a standard development tool in industry. However there are still limitations in adequate criteria for sheet metal fracture. In practice only the initial forming limit curve (FLC) of a material is used for interpretation of simulation results. The experimental effort to build up a FLC is very high and its application is limited to linear strain paths (this limitation is mostly violated in real industrial drawing operations). The FLC is a criterion for the onset of local necking. It does not predict cases of ductile fracture without necking. From this view one can derive that there is a need for refined and more effective criteria. The paper discusses the application of known macroscopic and mesoscopic models for instability and fracture in sheet metal forming and presents a new algorithm for the evaluation of localized necking for complex forming history.