DEM Simulation of Particle Packing Behavior in Colloidal Forming Processes

  1. Prof. Yves Bréchet
  1. Takashi Iwai,
  2. Chu-Wan Hong and
  3. Peter Greil

Published Online: 19 DEC 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527606157.ch9

Microstructures, Mechanical Properties and Processes - Computer Simulation and Modelling, Volume 3

Microstructures, Mechanical Properties and Processes - Computer Simulation and Modelling, Volume 3

How to Cite

Iwai, T., Hong, C.-W. and Greil, P. (2000) DEM Simulation of Particle Packing Behavior in Colloidal Forming Processes, in Microstructures, Mechanical Properties and Processes - Computer Simulation and Modelling, Volume 3 (ed Y. Bréchet), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527606157.ch9

Editor Information

  1. Institut Nat. Polytechnique de Grenoble, L.T.P.-C.M. ENSEEG, BP75, Domaine Universitaires, 38402 Saint Martin D'Hères Cedex, France; Tel.: 0033–76–82 6610; Fax: 0033–76–82 6644

Author Information

  1. University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Materials Science, Martensstr. 5, D-91058 Erlangen, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 DEC 2005
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2000

Book Series:

  1. EUROMAT 99

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527301225

Online ISBN: 9783527606153

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Keywords:

  • microstructures;
  • computer simulation;
  • discrete element method (DEM);
  • particle packing behavior;
  • colloidal forming processes

Summary

In this paper, we focus on the microscopic numerical analysis of colloidal forming processes. Our method is based on the discrete element method (DEM). The DEM has been developed originally to solve the time-dependent contact problems of soil and rock mechanics by Cundall. It deals with numerous spherical or disk particle elements, and regards the material of interests as an assembly of elements. The particle packing behavior in colloidal suspensions can be realized easily by the DEM modeling since a powder suspension can be handled as an assembly of independent powders flowing in the medium. The movement of each powder particle is traced according to Newton's law, so that DEM provides capability to evaluate the particle packing behavior directly. Through numerical simulations under various process conditions, relative packing densities and surface roughness are measured as quantitative evaluation.