Carbon Fibre Reinforced Copper Matrix Composites: Production Routes and Functional Properties

  1. B. Jouffrey
  1. W. Buchgraber1,
  2. G. Korb1,
  3. T. Schubert2 and
  4. B. Kempf3

Published Online: 9 MAY 2006

DOI: 10.1002/3527606165.ch22

Microstructural Investigation and Analysis, Volume 4

Microstructural Investigation and Analysis, Volume 4

How to Cite

Buchgraber, W., Korb, G., Schubert, T. and Kempf, B. (2000) Carbon Fibre Reinforced Copper Matrix Composites: Production Routes and Functional Properties, in Microstructural Investigation and Analysis, Volume 4 (ed B. Jouffrey), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527606165.ch22

Author Information

  1. 1

    Austrian Research Centers, Seibersdorf, Austria

  2. 2

    Fraunhofer-Inst. f. Fertigungstechnik u. Ang. Materialforschung, Dresden, Germany

  3. 3

    Degussa-Hüls, D-63403 Hanau, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 MAY 2006
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2000

Book Series:

  1. EUROMAT 99

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527301218

Online ISBN: 9783527606160

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Keywords:

  • microstructural investigation;
  • metal matrix composites;
  • carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites;
  • production routes;
  • functional properties

Summary

Carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites possess tailorable coefficients of thermal expansion and high thermal conductivities. These properties are very interesting for applications as heat sink material. It is a competitive material which is able to overcome some of the disadvantages (high density, bad machinability) of e.g. Copper-Molybdenum, Copper-Invar or Aluminium-Silicon Carbide. Several production routes of carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites are presented. This paper pays special attention to short carbon fibre reinforced copper matrix composites produced via hot pressing. There are two possibilities: Hot pressing of carbon fibre/copper powder mixtures or hot pressing of copper coated carbon fibres. Different carbon fibres (PAN-type, PITCH-type) will be discussed. PITCH-type fibres are better for the foreseen applications because of their higher thermal conductivity. Finally joinability and thermal cycling behaviour are discussed.