Advances in High Resolution Elemental Analysis Using Image-Spectroscopy

  1. Prof. T. W. Clyne and
  2. F. Simancik
  1. M. Weyland,
  2. P. J Thomas and
  3. P. A Midgley

Published Online: 21 DEC 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527606203.ch29

Metal Matrix Composites and Metallic Foams, Volume 5

Metal Matrix Composites and Metallic Foams, Volume 5

How to Cite

Weyland, M., Thomas, P. J. and Midgley, P. A. (2000) Advances in High Resolution Elemental Analysis Using Image-Spectroscopy, in Metal Matrix Composites and Metallic Foams, Volume 5 (eds T. W. Clyne and F. Simancik), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527606203.ch29

Editor Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge University, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, U.K.

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 DEC 2005
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2000

Book Series:

  1. EUROMAT 99

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527301263

Online ISBN: 9783527606207

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Keywords:

  • high resolution elemental analysis;
  • image spectroscopy

Summary

Conventionally EFTEM elemental maps are calculated from two or three images acquired before and after an ionisation edge, methods known as ‘jump-ratio’ or ‘three-window’ mapping respectively. As computers that can manipulate large data sets have become widespread it has become feasible to acquire a series of images over a large energy loss range hence over many spectral features. This technique is known as ‘image-spectroscopy’ and is analogous with spectrum-imaging in the STEM. The increase in spectral information offers distinct advantages over traditional methods. In this work a case study will be presented on an extensively sensitised 316 stainless steel to demonstrate the advantages of such an approach for materials science applications.