Effect of Complex Strain Paths on Hot Deformation of Aluminium Alloys

  1. Prof. T. W. Clyne and
  2. F. Simancik
  1. Bruce Davenport1 and
  2. Sybrand van der Zwaag1,2

Published Online: 21 DEC 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527606203.ch30

Metal Matrix Composites and Metallic Foams, Volume 5

Metal Matrix Composites and Metallic Foams, Volume 5

How to Cite

Davenport, B. and van der Zwaag, S. (2000) Effect of Complex Strain Paths on Hot Deformation of Aluminium Alloys, in Metal Matrix Composites and Metallic Foams, Volume 5 (eds T. W. Clyne and F. Simancik), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527606203.ch30

Editor Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge University, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, U.K.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Netherlands Institute for Metals Research, Delft, The Netherlands

  2. 2

    Laboratory for Materials Science, Delft Univeristy of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 DEC 2005
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2000

Book Series:

  1. EUROMAT 99

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527301263

Online ISBN: 9783527606207

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Keywords:

  • aluminium alloys;
  • hot deformation;
  • effect of complex strain paths

Summary

Currently, there is interest in modeling the development of microstructure in aluminium alloys during forming processes, both to predict the forces required to perform a given operation and to predict the final product properties. While much can be achieved with Finite Element techniques, good material models are still required. During rolling, the material experiences shear stresses in the near surface region because of friction between the roll and the stock. These shears are superimposed on the compressive strain also imposed by the rolls. Most models for microstructural evolution during deformation account for this complexity by reducing it to an equivalent total plastic strain. The aim of this project is to study the significance of the “strain path” in the near surface region. This is being carried out via thermomechanical testing on a combined axial-torsional (CAT) deformation machine. Early results from such mixed mode tests are presented and discussed.