Gas Permeability, Porosity and Carbonation of Modern Conservation Lime Mortar Mix

  1. Prof. F. H. Wittmann
  1. Jan Válek,
  2. John Hughes and
  3. Peter Bartos

Published Online: 23 DEC 2005

DOI: 10.1002/3527606211.ch30

Materials for Buildings and Structures, Volume 6

Materials for Buildings and Structures, Volume 6

How to Cite

Válek, J., Hughes, J. and Bartos, P. (2000) Gas Permeability, Porosity and Carbonation of Modern Conservation Lime Mortar Mix, in Materials for Buildings and Structures, Volume 6 (ed F. H. Wittmann), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527606211.ch30

Editor Information

  1. ETH Zürich, Institut für Baustoffe, Werkstoffchemie und Korrosion, ETH Hönggerberg, HIF E12, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland

Author Information

  1. Advanced Concrete and Masonry Centre, University of Paisley, Scotland, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 DEC 2005
  2. Published Print: 20 APR 2000

Book Series:

  1. EUROMAT 99

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527301256

Online ISBN: 9783527606214

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Keywords:

  • lime mortar mix;
  • gas permeability;
  • porosity;
  • carbonation

Summary

The paper attempts to connect practical problems arising from the use of lime mortars in conservation and the latest scientific research in transport phenomena and durability of porous materials. It identifies specific requirements and current issues, which need to be clarified from conservation practice. It also examines the scope of the problems by carrying out simple experiments on lime mortar specimens. Characteristics like gas permeability, porosity and gain of weight were determined after six months of curing. These characteristics were related to the carbonation process. Two hypotheses are suggested. First, the gas permeability of lime mortars is influenced more by surface finish than the amount of water added to the mix. Second, the carbonation process of lime mortars depends on the surface gas permeability rather than the internal gas permeability. The surface permeability is possibly the rate-determining factor.