Phenomenon of Precipitation of Metal Being Electrodeposited, Occurring via Formation of an Undercooled Liquid Metal Phase and its Subsequent Solidification. Part 1. Experimental Detection and Theoretical Grounding

  1. Prof. J. V. Wood2,
  2. Prof. Dr. L. Schultz3 and
  3. Prof. Dr. D. M. Herlach4
  1. Oleg B. Girin

Published Online: 25 APR 2006

DOI: 10.1002/3527607277.ch30

Materials Development and Processing - Bulk Amorphous Materials, Undercooling and Powder Metallurgy, Volume 8

Materials Development and Processing - Bulk Amorphous Materials, Undercooling and Powder Metallurgy, Volume 8

How to Cite

Girin, O. B. (2000) Phenomenon of Precipitation of Metal Being Electrodeposited, Occurring via Formation of an Undercooled Liquid Metal Phase and its Subsequent Solidification. Part 1. Experimental Detection and Theoretical Grounding, in Materials Development and Processing - Bulk Amorphous Materials, Undercooling and Powder Metallurgy, Volume 8 (eds J. V. Wood, L. Schultz and D. M. Herlach), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527607277.ch30

Editor Information

  1. 2

    University of Nottingham, Division of Materials, Nottingham NG7 2RD, United Kingdom

  2. 3

    Institut für Festkorper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V., Postfach 270016, 01171 Dresden, Germany

  3. 4

    Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Linder Hohe, 51170 Köln, Germany

Author Information

  1. Ukrainian State University of Chemical Engineering, Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 APR 2006
  2. Published Print: 27 JUN 2000

Book Series:

  1. EUROMAT 99

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527301935

Online ISBN: 9783527607273

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Keywords:

  • undercooled liquid metal phase;
  • precipitation of metal;
  • electrodeposition;
  • solidification;
  • experimental detection

Summary

Previous work revealed that the mosaic block size D in non-oriented grains of electrodeposited metals displayed periodicity with respect to metal nuclear charge z [1-5]. These findings gave an insight into relations between structure and melting point T for electrodeposited metals. A comparison between the D-z and T-z relationships suggested that the structural condition of an electrodeposited metal might be related to its melting point. Namely, the higher the T value, the greater the number of defects found in the structure [1,2].

Contemplation of these findings suggested an assumption that a metal might go through a liquid-state stage in the course of its electrodeposition. A test of this hypothesis lead to a discovery of a previously unknown phenomenon whose essence is that a metal being electrodeposited on a solid cathode in an aqueous environment will form a supercooled liquid metal phase which subsequently solidifies at the electrodeposition temperature, said phenomenon resulting from extremely rapid, explosion-like precipitation of the metal via a chain reaction of electrochemical formation of atoms followed by transition of their liquid clusters to a more stable amorphous or crystalline state, and manifesting itself in regular changes in substructure, granular structure, texture, structural condition and surface morphology of the metal as the supercooling during its electrodeposition becomes deeper.