Liquid Phase Sintered SiC with SiO2 Additive

  1. Prof. Dr. G. Müller
  1. Haihui Ye1,2,
  2. Georg Rixecker1,2 and
  3. Fritz Aldinger1,2

Published Online: 27 APR 2006

DOI: 10.1002/3527607293.ch29

Ceramics - Processing, Reliability, Tribology and Wear, Volume 12

Ceramics - Processing, Reliability, Tribology and Wear, Volume 12

How to Cite

Ye, H., Rixecker, G. and Aldinger, F. (2000) Liquid Phase Sintered SiC with SiO2 Additive, in Ceramics - Processing, Reliability, Tribology and Wear, Volume 12 (ed G. Müller), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, FRG. doi: 10.1002/3527607293.ch29

Editor Information

  1. Fraunhofer-Institut für Silicatforschung, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg, Germany

Author Information

  1. 1

    Max-Planck-Institut für Metallforschung, Universität Stuttgart, Pulvermetallurgisches Laboratorium, Heisenbergstrasse 5, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany

  2. 2

    Institut für Nichtmetallische Anorganische Materialien, Universität Stuttgart, Pulvermetallurgisches Laboratorium, Heisenbergstrasse 5, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 APR 2006
  2. Published Print: 27 JUN 2000

Book Series:

  1. EUROMAT 99

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9783527301942

Online ISBN: 9783527607297

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • ceramics;
  • liquid phase sintered SiC;
  • SiO2 additive

Summary

SiC liquid phase sintered with using SiO2 as the only sintering additive was studied as a model system. The mixture of SiC and SiO2 was supposed to form a liquid phase at low temperature and thereby promote the densification with the precondition that the decomposition reaction between SiC and SiO2 (SiC + 2SiO2 [RIGHTWARDS ARROW] 3SiO + CO) could be restricted by using CO gas as sintering atmosphere. The motivation for studying this special system despite its limited thermodynamic stability comes from the theoretical work by D. R. Clarke [1] on the equilibrium thickness of intergranular glass phases in ceramic materials. His calculations showed that only in the pure system SiC/SiO2, the siliceous intergranular phase will be unstable because the relatively large van der Waals attractive force between SiC grains outweighs the repulsive structural disjoining pressure of the silica glass phase, causing its equilibrium thickness to become zero. Therefore, the residue of the glass phase, which is necessary in the process of liquid phase sintering, would move to the triple junctions at the end of sintering. The experimental microstructures were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). More detailed investigations will be performed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM).